Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

You Can Feel The Derby Fest Excitement

Violent, detailed posts about a planned shooting at New Albany High School are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to a young woman’s Facebook account that’s out of her control. [WDRB]

Investigators are still days from getting a closer look inside General Electric’s Appliance Park’s Building 6, but plan to start with the massive structure’s southwest corner. [C-J/AKN]

This is the important news the folks at WHAS11 thought you needed. A British politician was caught eating a hot dog with a knife and fork. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking for a waiver to keep the test scores of some immigrant students who are not proficient in English from being counted against their schools. [H-L]

On Wednesday morning, Louisville paddles closer to the Great Steamboat Race. [WLKY]

A federal appeals court on Tuesday said Larry Flynt, the publisher of Hustler magazine, had a right to weigh in on two lawsuits challenging how Missouri conducts executions. [HuffPo]

A crowd of some 1,500 Paul supporters attended his 2016 Presidential campaign kickoff that included three of the four Republicans running to become Kentucky’s next Governor. [WAVE3]

Kentucky senator Rand Paul announced Tuesday his plans to run for president in 2016, with the libertarian becoming the second Republican to officially declare his candidacy. Here are some key facts to know about the first-term senator. [The Onion]

On the first day of its new HIV clinic, the Community Outreach Center in Austin, Ind., is quiet. [WFPL]

An interview with Sen. Rand Paul on Wednesday got testy as the libertarian-leaning Kentucky senator, fresh off launching his presidential campaign, battled suggestions he had changed his views on foreign policy. [The Hill]

Friday morning’s fire at GE’s Appliance Park has affected more than just the company, its employees and nearby residents. [Business First]

Democratic Party Chairman Tom Galligan believes the newest addition to the Clark County Sheriff’s Merit Board is problematic on a number of levels, but Sheriff Jamey Noel doesn’t see an issue. [News & Tribune]

LMPD’s WASP Problem Is Front & Center

The building formerly occupied by the restaurant Taco Punk in the NuLu neighborhood has a new owner. [WDRB]

Three teachers from duPont Manual High are challenging longtime Jefferson County Teachers Association leader Brent McKim in the union’s presidential election, saying they want to see the union push harder to fix the state’s woefully underfunded teacher pension system. [C-J/AKN]

Students at Brooklawn School will soon be getting their hands dirty all part of the learning process. [WHAS11]

Five barrels seized last week from behind a shed in Franklin County do contain Wild Turkey bourbon, according to a statement from Gruppo Campari, the distillery’s parent. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city apparently can’t get enough of this story. A 73-year-old Louisville woman was found dead in an old septic tank Tuesday night. [WLKY]

These bills, it turns out, are essentially efforts to undermine Wall Street reform and Obamacare while greenlighting pollution. [HuffPo]

Oh, looky, LMPD has begun its revisionist history tour with its religious pretty boy who fancies himself an actor. [WAVE3]

When a four-year-old comes home from Pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her “choice time” playing on the computer, what’s a parent to do? [NPR]

Louisville Gas and Electric is still on track to open the company’s natural gas-fired power plant in Louisville in May, as it retires the current Cane Run coal power plant. The new power plant won’t produce coal ash, but 60 years worth of old ash will remain on site. [WFPL]

Several battleground states are planning ballot measures that could force presidential contenders to take firm stances on marijuana legalization. [The Hill]

Clifton’s Pizza Co. has been a Louisville and Frankfort Avenue institution for more than two decades and will celebrate its 25th anniversary this weekend. [Business First]

An appeal hearing over the New Albany Police Merit Commission’s decision to fire Officer Laura Schook has been continued at her request. [News & Tribune]

Abramson Having Fun Getting Lost In Warshington

Just on the other side of Interstate 65 from the University of Louisville campus, a block that once contained an aging apartment building and unkempt rental houses is now the latest example of the student-housing arms race at U of L. [WDRB]

Ford Motor Co. announced Thursday morning that hourly workers would receive an average profit-sharing check of $6,900. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville police continue to investigate a stabbing that took place on Muhammad Ali Boulevard near 26th Street around 5:30 Saturday night. [WHAS11]

With welders on site, members of Habitat for Humanity made strides toward history for the state organization as they recently worked to convert a shipping container into a home. [H-L]

WARNING!RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Clark County officials continue to crack down on contraband through raids at the county jail. [WLKY]

Does your member of congress have policies in place protecting LGBT staffers from discrimination? [HuffPo]

Jerry Abramson says five terms as Louisville’s mayor gave him the experience to assist President Barack Obama’s administration. [WAVE3]

Kentuckians want to see their governors in the flesh and in their hometowns. And they expect him or her to be “one of us.” That’s a challenge for the stiff and stylish Louisville Democrat. [Ronnie Ellis]

As a national debate about law enforcement practices gripped the nation, formal complaints by community members against Louisville Metro Police were at a five-year low. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s fiscal 2016 budget would impose a one-time 14 percent tax on some $2 trillion of accumulated U.S. corporate profits earned abroad and set up a 19 percent tax on future foreign earnings, a White House official said on Sunday. [Reuters]

Restaurants and food establishments are graded on a number of criteria, including cleanliness, food temperatures and labeling. [Business First]

A study conducted on parking and traffic in downtown Jeffersonville shows that the 20-block area will be seriously lacking in parking spots as future development continues. [News & Tribune]

No Poverty? Thousands Can’t Pay Their LG&E Bill

Louisville Metro Council elected leadership Monday night and there’s a few familiar faces in the leadership positions. [WDRB]

The local paper finally did a story about the minimum wage increase and this is what they came up with. [C-J/AKN]

Should everyone be skeptical about the new hotel plans? [More C-J/AKN]

Mayor Rick Richards pleaded guilty to drug trafficking but says that he is still innocent. [WHAS11]

Kentucky taxpayers will fork over about $3.56 million to pay for the 2015 General Assembly, which begins at noon Tuesday. Most of the money will go for legislative compensation. [H-L]

An investigation is underway into a garage fire near the Bullitt-Jefferson County line. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell are warily looking for areas of agreement as they begin a new chapter in a relationship that is likely to remain frosty but businesslike. [HuffPo]

Monday’s cold temperatures left some parents wondering if it was too cold for students, especially bus riders, to go to school. [WAVE3]

The cost of US war-making in the 13 years since the September 11 terrorist attacks reached a whopping $1.6 trillion in 2014, according to a recent report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS). [Mother Jones]

Thousands of Jefferson County residents in jeopardy of having their heat cut off during the winter months will soon be allowed to apply for the Low-Income Heating Assistance Program. [WFPL]

Representative Phil Moffett, R-Louisville (32nd District) announced Monday his intention to file a bill for the 2015 session of Kentucky’s General Assembly that if passed would direct all counties that currently do not have an operating jail to consolidate their local jailer’s office with the county sheriff’s office. The proposal is the first bill filed by the newly elected House Republican. [Press Release]

Cunningham’s Restaurant on South Fourth Street closed Sunday night, but its owner is now saying that it’s not gone for good. [Business First]

A donation drive in December yielded much-needed supplies and even some cash for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter. [News & Tribune]