Crisis In Southern Indiana Highlights Importance Of Needle Exchanges

Officials are now calling the HIV outbreak in southern Indiana an epidemic. [WDRB]

Are you excited for the beginning of the Kentucky Derby Festival? Get ready. It’s almost here. [C-J/AKN]

The area’s first organized walk to end discrimination and bullying took place Wednesday evening at Louisville’s Big Four Bridge. [WHAS11]

Members of the NAACP in Lexington are raising questions about how Fayette County Public Schools distributes money to individual schools and about the district’s minority hiring rates. [H-L]

Sounds like these kids need to be in charge of UofL’s actual finances. Maybe they could stop the unbelievable swindling of tens of millions of dollars right under Jim Ramsey’s knowing nose. Some business students from the University of Louisville are participating next month in the national level of a global financial analysis competition. [WLKY]

Gary Fury was working at a Simonton Windows factory in West Virginia in July 2012 when a large two-window unit slipped to the floor. [ProPublica]

It’s not the picture of Louisville many people want to see – garbage and litter lining the interstates and expressways into town. [WAVE3]

Kentucky is apparently the 8th-worst state for retirement. Which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. [Bankrate]

Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District Board has voted to change the way the agency disposes of surplus property. The board voted unanimously to adopt the modifications to MSD’s policies on Monday. [WFPL]

The Early Childhood Profiles, produced by the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics (KCEWS), are compiled to help community leaders, Community Early Childhood Councils and school districts with data to assist in developing local strategies for helping every child in their community arrive at kindergarten ready to do kindergarten work. [Click the Clicky]

A $30 million upscale student housing complex is slated to open by fall 2016 at the northwest corner of South Floyd Street and East Brandeis Avenue near the University of Louisville. [Business First]

Donors are still being sought, but statewide, community foundations have reached the halfway point in a funding drive to match a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant worth up to $66 million. [News & Tribune]

Ford Motor Co said on Wednesday it is recalling more than 220,000 vehicles in North America for potential issues with door handles, vacuum pump relays and sensors. [Reuters]

Watch Greg Pretend He Didn’t Want To Run

Another day, another pedestrian death. Doesn’t matter who is at fault – the victim or the driver – this city is riddled with pedestrian deaths. [WDRB]

Shots rang out early Tuesday morning in the Beecher Terrace housing project, leaving in their wake the city’s 21st homicide victim of 2015. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer claims he has no intention to try running for U.S. Senate again in 2016. But he absolutely wanted to. He still doesn’t comprehend that he’ll never win statewide office. Ever. And if anyone had enough money, he wouldn’t currently be mayor. [WHAS11]

When I first heard that Alan Stein had agreed to chair the Fayette County Public Schools’ redistricting committee, I thought: Has he lost his mind? [Tom Eblen]

For this year’s 60th Celebration of the Kentucky Derby Festival, KDF has teamed up with the Kentucky Lottery to name someone the 2015 Festival Fanatic. [WLKY]

Darren Wilson, the former police officer who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, in August, will not face federal civil rights charges in connection with Brown’s death, Justice Department officials said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

A fight among teenagers Monday led to gunfire in the Shawnee neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Here’s Greg Stumbo using Legislative Research Commission staffers to write a column about how he believes he’s a pension genius who saved the pension system. Sadly, everyone old enough to legally think on their own knows all hell is breaking loose on that front. [Floyd County Times]

A voluntary biennial survey for Kentucky teachers that’s meant to measure their opinions of schools, resources, education leadership and community support is now available to take online. [WFPL]

Over the past decade, states have slashed workers’ compensation benefits, denying injured workers help when they need it most and shifting the costs of workplace accidents to taxpayers. [ProPublica]

Is it just us or is this yet another hyped up Fischer stunt that won’t go anywhere? [Business First]

Residents of the 200 and 300 blocks of Pearl Street in downtown Jeffersonville soon will have a designated place to park. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Have So Many Murders

Internal reviews conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education at three of Jefferson County’s lowest performing schools show progress is being made towards improving achievement, but that some changes must still be made. [Toni Konz]

Does anyone really buy into this Fischer transparency schtick anymore? n the wake of criticisms that public officials were deleting electronic messages, Mayor Greg Fischer Monday said that every person serving on a board or commission will be issued an email address to conduct all official government business. [C-J/AKN]

Two of Louisville’s largest employers are urging Kentucky lawmakers to reject Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s push for the state to allow a local option sales tax. [WHAS11]

A move to raise the minimum wage in Kentucky’s largest city has resulted in a lawsuit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another couple of senseless murders in Possibility City. [WLKY]

To Washington insiders he is Dr Evil: the hidden orchestrator of industry campaigns against the Humane Society, Mothers against Drunk Driving, and other seemingly uncontroversial groups. Now Richard Berman, a one-time lobbyist turned industry strategist, has zeroed in on another target: Barack Obama’s new power plant rules. [HuffPo]

What began as a call for help along Interstate 71 ended with police discovering a car crash with a man shot dead inside Wednesday. The shooting forced southbound I-71 closed near the Gene Snyder Freeway for hours impacting travel for hundreds of people. [WAVE3]

Brown-Forman is among 16 organizations across the United States recognized for climate action. [EPA]

The recent revelation that breathalyzer tests are video recorded at the Louisville jail may lead to an influx of filings to re-opened drunk driving cases in the near future. [WFPL]

Wanna dig through Churchill Downs’ quarterly and full year earnings results? [External PDF Link]

The Kentucky Derby Festival unveiled its 2015 Pegasus Pins at an event at Hard Rock Café and it doesn’t suck. [Business First]

Slick, icy roads didn’t stop New Albany residents from packing the Carnegie Center for Art & History to discuss a hot-button issue Saturday. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Harassment Scandal Still Front & Center

A mobile application concept developed by a team of eighth graders at Meyzeek Middle School has won the school $20,000, the students brand new tablets and now they’ll work with an expert to make their concept a reality. [WDRB]

At the Metropolitan Sewer District, board members and the executive director routinely use private accounts or personal smartphones to do agency business, sending emails or text messages to each other, the former chairman asserts. This is how Greg Fischer conducts business these days. He’s crapping his pants. [C-J/AKN]

We now know the theme of this year’s Thunder Over Louisville. The big reveal took place Tuesday morning with the help of six sponsors for the big day: A Boom with a View. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate said Monday he will rule this week whether the Legislative Research Commission must turn over all sexual harassment complaints involving lawmakers and staffers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Local first responders are facing a major life-and-death situation, and they’re not sure how to stop it from getting worse. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama wants to create a new government agency dedicated to keeping the nation’s food safe. [HuffPo]

A woman being booked into Louisville Metro Corrections was found to be carrying a possible explosive device. [WAVE3]

What can be proven beyond a doubt is that, even if underlying economic trends have increased inequality, Obama’s economic policies have reduced it sharply. [NY Magazine]

The plan to develop a Wal-Mart on Broadway and Dixie Highway is now heading to the Board of Zoning Adjustments—bringing the project just a couple steps away from construction. [WFPL]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is bringing in an all-star team led by Hill-veteran Antonia Ferrier. [Politico]

Following an uptick in office activity in 2014, the industrial vacancy rate in the Louisville area continued to fall in 2014 as absorption soared above 5.6 million square feet of warehouse inventory, according to a report by Louisville commercial real estate firm Commercial Kentucky Inc. [Business First]

The outlook for the May primary, and in some regards, the November general election, became clearer this week as several candidates filed in major New Albany races. [News & Tribune]

Let’s Pretend Everything Is Amazing For 2 Weeks

The secret to Derby Pie’s success: magic, obviously. Don’t even try explaining it. [WDRB]

Looky there, it’s Mitch McConnell spreading minimum wage fear. Instead of spreading racially-charged anti-Obama rhetoric (and that’s what it is— fear of a black man or a scary Muslim, at least in Kentucky), Granny Mitch ought to focus on ripping apart Alison Grimes’ lack of substance. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another pedestrian hit by a vehicle in Possibility Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

Watching Keith Runyon continue to defend the dying beast and Gannett never stops being entertaining. Blaming changing technology is just an excuse. Not adapting is the real sadness here. The book industry, much like the music industry, has evolved. Just like the news industry. This bizarre bitterness at the younger generation taking over does nothing but encourage resentment and bitterness. [HuffPo]

Thousands of runners took part in the Kentucky Derby Festival marathon and mini-marathon on Saturday. [WLKY]

We linked to this story about school segregation last week but feel the need to promote it again. Louisville gets a significant mention. [ProPublica]

Witnesses said a 24-year-old was speeding and driving erratically before he drove over a curb, hitting and killing a 5-year-old boy. [WAVE3]

Kentucky U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Louisville, said Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes probably should have spoken up earlier about her frustration with the Legislative Ethics Commission handling of a sexual harassment case. [CN|2]

After a series of meetings spanning nearly three months, a Jefferson County Public Schools committee tasked with reworking the district’s code of student conduct is ready to present its revisions to the Board of Education for approval. [WFPL]

Metro United Way has announced the results of its 2013 annual campaign. The organization raised about $28.1 million, down from the $28.9 million a year ago. [Business First]

Three very different Democrats with different experience levels, different skill sets and different outlooks have one thing in common — they all want to serve as Clark County Commissioner. [News & Tribune]

You’ve Probably Already Skipped Out For Thunder

JCPS officials are responding to an FBI memo sent to local law enforcement claiming a gang of middle schoolers is responsible for the downtown mob violence in late March. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville announced Thursday that it has reached its fundraising goal of $1 billion for its capital campaign, which began in 2007. [C-J/AKN]

We are just days away from the kick off of the Kentucky Derby Festival – Thunder Over Louisville. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell has spent his career being weak on health care. So where is Alison Grimes? Sitting on her hands. [Page One]

A man implicated in the Kroger shooting was offered a plea deal in robbery case, but he hasn’t taken it yet. [WLKY]

The University of Kentucky will pay about $792,000 to its men’s and women’s basketball coaches after the postseason, in which the women made it to the NCAA Sweet 16 and the men got to the NCAA title game. [H-L]

A verbal argument on a TARC bus between two passengers turned physical when one of them pulled out a knife. [WAVE3]

Just a handful of the reasons Louisville should oppose this kind of merger between Comcast and Time Warner. [HuffPo]

Does Walmart fit with the vision of west Louisville’s economic and jobs plan? Attica Scott is a bit delusional if she thinks creating jobs where there were none — in an area there there is almost no other business to compete with — just delusional. [WFPL]

A Louisville man who pleaded guilty to a deadly drunk driving accident in 2009 is facing another DUI charge. [WLEX18]

Wait for it, wait for it… yet another soon-to-be-closed joint is opening up at 4th Street Live. Workers appear to be putting the finishing touches on Tavern on Fourth, a new bar opening at the Fourth Street Live entertainment district downtown. [Business First]

Employees of Greater Clark County Schools have a little extra time to decide whether to retire this year and get severance benefits after a vote at Tuesday’s board of trustees meeting. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Is Really Hung Over This Morning

The Kentucky Derby Festival will hold its annual Republic Bank Pegasus Parade Position Draw on Tuesday, April 8. That’s today if you aren’t paying attention [WDRB]

Housing battles homelessness in Louisville. Brian Scarsbrook had been homeless for more than a year, battling drug addiction and haunted by memories of childhood neglect and abuse. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steven Conrad said there is no threat regarding the safety to people while at Thunder Over Louisville this year. [WHAS11]

One of the UK’s top doctors says an accumulating body of evidence supports a link between urban green space and benefits to human wellbeing. Royal College of Physicians president Sir Richard Thompson said plants helped reduce stress, anger and depression. [BBC]

Oh, look, even more old white people walked across the bridge and back as if that’s going to solve something. [WLKY]

Results of 2014’s sales of juveniles have a feast-or-famine feel to them heading into Keeneland’s April 2-year-olds in training one-day auction Monday. [H-L]

They claim it was beer but we’re not really sure Keystone is real beer. Traffic is flowing once again after an overturned trailer closed an interstate ramp for more than 7 1/2 hours. [WAVE3]

Who needs a good flashback to 24 years ago? Let’s dig in to Mitch McConnell’s Fancy Farm speech from then. [Page One]

The majority of Americans now live in cities, which means we have very little to do anymore with the production of our food. But there’s a reversal of that trend afoot, as more city people decide that they want to cultivate crops and raise some livestock. [NPR]

A hearing on charges that former Indiana state schools superintendent Tony Bennett used state resources in his failed 2012 re-election bid has been pushed back until August. [News & Tribune]

What do Louisville Country Club and Standard County Club have in common? Financially, not much. [Business First]

Security at this year’s Thunder Over Louisville will be boosted like never before. More than 1,100 police officers from Louisville Metro Police Department and several other agencies will be working at the aircraft and fireworks show. [WFPL]