Murder Is Just Way Normal Here, Right?

A Louisville murder victim was recently involved in another high profile case. [WDRB]

Hundreds of new MSD customers have been getting wastewater and drainage services without being billed for them, agency officials said Monday, creating an issue with the Louisville Water Co. that handles billing for both. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO The coroner has identified a man who was shot and killed in the 300 block of East Oak Street on Sunday, March 27. [WHAS11]

Attorney General Andy Beshear has hired another veteran of his father’s administration to replace Tim Longmeyer, the former deputy attorney general who resigned and is now facing federal bribery charges. [Press Release & H-L]

Health officials say the number of cases of whooping cough in northern Kentucky has reached record levels recently. [WLKY]

Young women of color face particularly tough barriers to success in school, work and life. Now one foundation is working with them to break them down. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. A man was shot and killed Monday afternoon in the Hallmark neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Turns out, one of the people at the center of the latest political scandal in Kentucky is knee-deep in something really exciting. Spoiler alert: it’s probably not entirely safe for work. [Page One]

Brenda and Robert Erickson filtered into City Hall last Thursday evening, a few minutes before the Louisville Metro Council began its regular meeting. [WFPL]

On November 19, 2014, the door clanged shut behind David Sesson and Bernard Simmons. Sesson put his hands through the food slot to have his handcuffs removed. Both men were in “disciplinary segregation,” a bureaucratic term for solitary confinement, at Menard Correctional Center in southern Illinois. But unlike many in solitary, Sesson and Simmons wouldn’t have a moment alone. [The Marshall Project]

Greater Louisville Inc. announced the promotion of several employees Monday. [Business First]

Animal control officers will have to wait at least two more weeks before they’re able to enforce new Jeffersonville laws on animal welfare. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Just Got Waaaaay Worse

Delores Sisson says the first jump in rent of her subsidized apartment on W. Breckinridge Street happened two years ago – rising from $358 a month in 2014 to $438 a month last year and jumping to $652 a month this year. [WDRB]

Surprise! Greg Fischer and his team are lying about something again. This time that something benefits his wealthy friends and donors but no one has the guts to call him out on it. A little more transparency — something Fischer has never taken seriously — would go a long way. [C-J/AKN]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings. Police responded to a report of a shooting in the 1700 block of Berry Boulevard around 2:30 a.m. Sunday morning. [WHAS11]

As a boxer and humanitarian, Muhammad Ali stood out. So does the bright pink home in Kentucky where he shadowboxed and played pranks on his brother. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another pedestrian killed by a train in Louisville. [WLKY]

These anti-woman efforts aren’t just taking place in Floriduh, they’re also taking places in Kentucky. And Democrats are cheering the restrictionsi along every step of the way. [HuffPo]

See? All kinds of shootings. One person was injured in a shooting on Oak Street on Sunday. [WAVE3]

Reproductive rights advocates are warning that Indiana has become one of the most dangerous states for pregnant women, thanks to the governor’s decision to approve a sweeping new anti-abortion law that combines some of the harshest attacks on reproductive rights into one piece of legislation. [ThinkProgress]

The Louisville Metro Council rejected a bid from Louisville Gas and Electric to establish a natural gas franchise agreement. [WFPL]

We’ve been leading the pack when it comes to revealing information about new scandals. Find out how to keep up. [Page One]

A developer is asking Louisville Metro government and Jefferson County Public Schools for property tax breaks worth $11.3 million over the next 20 years so it can move forward with two apartment projects planned near the intersection of Baxter Avenue and Broadway. [Business First]

A Clark County judge on Friday confirmed the appeal of a candidate challenging the outcome of the recount in the Jeffersonville City Council At-large race. [News & Tribune]

Out-Of-Control Local Media Hype

There was a definitely-not-rare shooting in Louisville yesterday and everyone at WDRB lost their damn mind. Education reporter Toni Konz was there with bells on, scaring the shit out of her teenage followers. All because it was a slow news day. [WDRB]

Congress has effectively lifted the nation’s longstanding ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs, which allow intravenous drug addicts to trade dirty syringes for clean ones in the hopes of preventing disease. [C-J/AKN]

The folks at WHAS11 weren’t quite as bad when it came to freaking out over the shooting. That station is no longer run by a delusional teabagger, so it’s the least hype-y station in town. [WHAS11]

A proliferation of threats at schools across the state has officials working with police to determine best responses and prevention techniques. [H-L]

WLKY was also beside itself with the shooting coverage. Just not quite as insane as WDRB. [WLKY]

The economy generated almost 300,000 jobs last year and cut the nominal unemployment rate to five percent. But family incomes for most people are still deeply depressed. [HuffPo]

Don’t worry, WAVE3 also got in on the shooting hype action. The tea people in charge there made sure they hyped it up plenty. [WAVE3]

Swedish home appliance maker Electrolux said on Monday its CEO Keith McLoughlin would retire and be replaced by senior executive Jonas Samuelson, just a month after the biggest deal in the company’s history collapsed. [Reuters]

This is what happens when people like WDRB’s education reporter hype the hell out of something, keeping people scared. Sure, she and her colleagues freak out when their actions are questioned, but they’re still to blame. CALM DOWN BEYONCE! [WFPL]

In 10 months, Americans will go to the polls to pick the next U.S. president. When they cast their ballots, those votes will likely hinge on how they feel about the issues most important to them. But what are those issues? [NPR]

A pair of creditors is looking to force the troubled Bullitt Utilities Inc. into Chapter 7 bankruptcy, claiming it is their best hope of getting paid what they’re owed. [Business First]

Indiana politics are just as dumb as Kentucky politics. The first meeting the New Albany City Council in 2016 had little drama, except for one announcement from the councilman who is beginning his fifth term. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Council’s Following Frankfort Off A Cliff

The principal at a top performing JCPS school is concerned about losing teachers. [WDRB]

In a stunning move, Democrat David Tandy said Tuesday he will not seek a fourth term and will forgo a bid to serve a second consecutive term as Metro Council president. Most political observers were the opposite of stunned. Tandy’s been attacked the past year by the Stumbo Democrats – the anti-progressives who learned how to play dirty at the hands of David Yates, Stumbo’s former deputy. On top of that, Tandy has a history of running from fights. Reference: Cordish, everything Abramson ever tried, nearly everything the corrupt Jim King pushed. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. Nothing’s new in 2016. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell says a Republican takeover of the statehouse is inevitable. He’s right. But it’ll only last a few years. [H-L]

Making an already difficult system worse. TARC will be adjusting service on seven bus routes beginning Jan. 31. Most of the service changes involve minor adjustments to pick-up times in response to traffic conditions and delays. [WLKY]

Of course Indiana bigots want to fine transgendered individuals for using the “wrong” restroom. [HuffPo]

There’s a new rally cry to help prevent juveniles from getting into trouble late at night. Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad has been asking for a curfew law that is easier for officers to enforce for nearly two years. Now, Louisville Metro Council Members are asking questions. [WAVE3]

A foreclosure case involving Land of Tomorrow Productions LLC, the company that owns the Funtown Mountain property in Cave City, is moving forward, according to action taken during Barren Circuit Court on Monday morning. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Just what Louisville needs, another Greg Fischer protege! [WFPL]

An emotional US President Barack Obama has unveiled new restrictions on gun purchases, saying the “constant excuses for inaction” have to stop. [BBC]

Just a few days before Christmas, the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development named a new leader it believes can march the county toward new heights. [Business First]

Clark County is soon to undergo an inventory and assessment of signs in the county, to comply with federal regulations. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

David James In The Hot Seat Again

This should be a ton of fun.

From Phillip Bailey:

An attorney is accusing Metro Councilman David James of violating the city’s code of ethics for showing fellow council members unreleased information on Democratic aide Elizabeth Hoffman’s arrest and incarceration.

Attorney Shannon Fauver filed the complaint, obtained by The Courier-Journal, with the Metro Ethics Commission last Tuesday. It alleges James abused his position to obtain a video and audio tapes of Hoffman’s January arrest and incarceration at Metro Corrections to influence other members.

Ruh ro?

All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]