All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]

City’s Murder Rate Creeps A Bit Higher

The City of Louisville has been dismissed from a lawsuit stemming from the mob violence on March 22, 2014, according to court documents. [WDRB]

An officer-involved shooting near Lassiter Middle School in South Louisville resulted in a fatality Wednesday evening, according to LMPD spokeswoman Carey Klain. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS wants a waiver to keep the test scores of some immigrant students who are not proficient in English from being counted against their schools. [WHAS11]

We still can’t stop laughing at how hard Sannie “Secret Sannie” Overly and the Democrats are fighting to keep their corruption secret. [H-L]

Another day, another fun shooting in Greg Fischer’s Compassionate Possibility City! [WLKY]

Global warming isn’t just affecting the weather, it’s harming Americans’ health, President Barack Obama said Tuesday as he announced steps government and businesses will take to better understand and deal with the problem. [HuffPo]

Freshman Monica Sokolik said she never felt uncomfortable with anything her Delta Zeta sisters asked of her when she pledged the sorority fall semester. But she’s grateful University of Louisville administrators are investigating claims of hazing leveled against Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, on principle. [WAVE3]

Neither Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky nor New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was invited to address the NRA’s Leadership Forum. [Politico]

On the first day of its new HIV clinic, the Community Outreach Center in Austin, Ind., is quiet. [WFPL]

Rand Paul has skipped most Homeland Security hearings since 2014, a review of videos and documents related to the hearings show. [BuzzFeed]

Marathon Petroleum Corp. recently told federal regulators that only a small amount of jet fuel has been cleaned up in Shively — nearly two months after 160 barrels of the fuel were leaked into the ground. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning Department is proposing changes to its sign ordinance to reduce visual clutter and provide consistency throughout the city. [News & Tribune]

Name Changes & Buzzwords Are The Only Thing Greg Fischer Pushes. Other Than Official Coverups, Of Course.

Louisville’s emergency alert system has a new name. It will now be called LENS, which stands for Louisville Emergency Notification System. [WDRB]

A resident who lives near General Electric Appliance Park has filed a lawsuit claiming the company was negligent in storing flammable material in its warehouse. [C-J/AKN]

Community activists in west Louisville are reacting to two new murder cases that happened during the weekend. [WHAS11]

Democrats took little time Tuesday to blast U.S. Sen. Rand Paul’s presidential ambitions. [H-L]

Thunder Over Louisville officials on Tuesday announced the lineup for this year’s air show. [WLKY]

The lawmakers behind a recent congressional amendment protecting medical marijuana operations in states where the drug is legal strongly rebuked the Department of Justice for trying to continue to crack down on some medical marijuana businesses. [HuffPo]

This happened in your city yesterday. U.S. Sen. Rand Paul announced on his website Tuesday morning that he is running for president. [WAVE3]

State Rep. Sannie Overly, a Democrat, is fighting to keep what she knows about harassment and retaliation in Frankfort a secret. [Page One]

A new partnership between the Louisville Metro Housing Authority and the Coalition for the Homeless aims to help more homeless residents find permanent housing. [WFPL]

Will you be going to Governor Bigot Beshear’s Kentucky Derby celebration in Frankfart? [Click the Clicky]

Louisville-based Humana Inc. says it expects a funding increase of about 0.8 percent for its Medicare Advantage patients in 2016. The company had been expecting a decrease of 1.25 percent. [Business First]

The relationship between Mayor Jeff Gahan’s administration and the police union appears to be strained. A police officer is under investigation for a Facebook post and questions have arisen regarding apparent attempts to cease pay for embattled officer Laura Schook. [News & Tribune]

Fischer’s Right: Clear Your Dang Sidewalks!

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office hopes the Kentucky House will soon take up a pair of bills giving the city more power to deal with vacant and abandoned properties. [WDRB]

Senate Republican leaders on Friday sent the bill to ban smoking in indoor public places to a committee chaired by an opponent of the bill. [C-J/AKN]

As the days of ice and snow slowly pass us by, Mayor Fischer asks locals to tend to their sidewalks and help out around the neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Democrats have become a confused political party with a muddled message and an inability to turn out enough of its loyal voters, a party task force charged with how to revive the embattled party said Saturday. [H-L]

Almost two years later and there are still no arrests and no suspects in the murder of Bardstown police officer Jason Ellis. [WLKY]

U.S. District Judge James Boasberg issued a preliminary injunction Friday blocking the Obama administration from detaining individuals seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border, saying the policy illegally aims to deter others from immigrating to the U.S. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was arrested after he fired a gun into a parking lot. [WAVE3]

Congressman Thomas Massie, R-Ky. 4th District, told a small audience at Ashland Community and Technical College’s Summit campus he is personally concerned with entrepreneurship. [Ashland Independent]

It’s the second week of smoking cessation classes at Family Health Centers in the Portland neighborhood. [WFPL]

The Obama administration says the current system promotes conflicts of interest, leads to high fees and erodes returns on investment. [NPR]

Sayreville, N.J.-based Sabert Corp. is doubling the size of its food-packaging manufacturing center in Shepherdsville with a project that got under way a few months ago. [Business First]

The appeals hearing for embattled New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook will be held March 10 and March 11 in executive sessions. [News & Tribune]

Let’s Hope For A Scandal-Free Friday, Folks

New body cameras have arrived in Jeffersonville and officials hope they will protect both police and the public. [WDRB]

Now’s your chance to tell JCPS exactly what you think. We’re linking to this old story because that front-page hype about David Jones and his wife was insane. [C-J/AKN]

While Kentucky legislators debate ways to fight the deadly spread of heroin abuse, a new poll indicates that problems with the drug continue to grow worse, particularly in the state’s metropolitan areas. [WHAS11]

The Legislative Research Commission must turn over all sexual harassment complaints involving lawmakers and staffers filed within the past five years, plus an investigative report about allegations against former state Rep. John Arnold, a judge ruled Wednesday. [H-L]

A 14-year-old special needs boy has a brand-new three-wheel bike, after his was stolen in Okolona. [WLKY]

Rand Paul on Wednesday continued to walk back his comments that parents should be allowed to choose whether to vaccinate their children, saying he holds the same position as President Barack Obama on the matter. [HuffPo]

A Franklin County judge on Wednesday agreed to add House Majority Whip Johnny Bell as a defendant in an ongoing sexual harassment lawsuit filed by a legislative staffer. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama’s pledge to reform the way U.S. spy agencies access vast amounts of metadata on Americans’ telephone calls is facing increasing obstacles, U.S. officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Wiltshire Pantry Bakery and Cafe on Barret Avenue will likely lose a few regulars this fall. About 300 city employees currently working at the Urban Government Center on Barret Avenue will relocate to the Edison Center on Seventh Street in Old Louisville. [WFPL]

The low-level radioactive waste disposal site Maxey Flats near Hillsboro is prepared to enter its final capping construction, which will be performed by Montgomery County’s Walker Co. [Ashland Independent]

Shares of Louisville-based Humana Inc. are up about 1.23 percent this afternoon, to $150 per share. That’s after the company reported higher fourth quarter revenues and profits compared to a year ago. [Business First]

It was a Louisville judge who finally made Jerry Westmoreland sober for good. Westmoreland had spent days in jail suffering from delirium tremens — better known as the DTs — when the judge sent him out of Louisville instead of back into Central State Mental Hospital. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Democrats May Just Be The Worst

By a unanimous vote, Councilman David Tandy (D-4) was elected President of the Louisville Metro Council for the remainder of 2015 during the Council’s regular meeting on Thursday night. Maybe he’ll visit Cordish again and sign a non-disclosure agreement, refusing to reveal what he discovers to the public. Or maybe he’ll use his council staff as a babysitter again. So many opportunities. [Press Release]

Students, staff and alumni at Fern Creek Traditional High School are seeking to rename the school Fern Creek High School. [WDRB]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday delivered a blow to Metropolitan Sewer District management, providing an opinion that there’s no legal reason why the agency’s board could not agree to a contract provision requested by one of its unions. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has joined in the criminal investigation into the troubled Southeast Bullitt Fire Department. [WHAS11]

Food prices across Kentucky continue to rise, increasing 1. 7 percent in the last quarter of 2014. According the Kentucky Farm Bureau Marketbasket Survey, the cost of 40 basic grocery items averaged $129.14 in the last quarter. It’s the seventh consecutive quarter of rising prices and represents an all-time high. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A doctor who practiced in Louisville and southern Indiana was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with prescribing pain medications that resulted in the deaths of five patients, health care fraud and unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances. [WLKY]

A bill that would redefine a full-time work week under the Affordable Care Act as 40 hours instead of 30 actually amounts to a break for corporations, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) argued in a hearing Thursday. [HuffPo]

The era of prohibiting alcohol sales on Sundays in Indiana might be over soon. [WAVE3]

Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow, the new state House majority whip, informed his predecessor’s staff Wednesday that they would be replaced – including Yolanda Costner, one of the women suing the legislature over allegations of sexual harassment by former Rep. John Arnold. [Ronnie Ellis]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks a Missouri nonprofit hospital to explain why it seizes the wages of thousands of its patients. [ProPublica]

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday that Louisville’s Office of Sustainability has launched a “green” infrastructure incentive program for businesses. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan has requested Time Warner Cable pursue strategies for Gigabit connections on a trial basis for some areas of New Albany. The city has been exploring a permanent Gigabit connection to provide high-speed Internet options for customers in New Albany. In a press release issued Friday, the city announced the trial areas will include downtown, the Purdue Research Park and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]