Hope Henderson Doesn’t Copy Secrecy

A family is trying to figure out why their dad was stabbed at a Louisville gas station. [WDRB]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

The Phoenix Hill Tavern (PHT) and Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium closed permanently on Monday, June 1. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky’s Gatton College of Business and Economics has wrapped up a 10-year, $2.5 million donation from BB&T that will result in a new program on capitalism and funding toward the college’s $65 million renovation. But Gatton officials stepped back from the more controversial aspects of the original 2004 agreement, including a requirement for an Ayn Rand reading room, named for the novelist and free market philosopher. [H-L]

A Louisville park is hosting a night of camping in June as part of a national celebration. [WLKY]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

A minister has a new plan to try to curb crime in West Louisville. [WAVE3]

It’s almost like these folks in Henderson didn’t bother talking to anyone living in the real world in Louisville. [Henderson Gleaner]

A resident must work full-time and earn at least $14.17 an hour to afford a modest two-bedroom apartment in Louisville, according to a recent study from the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [WFPL]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ford Motor Co. CEO Mark Fields said aluminum-body F-Series Super Duty Trucks will be launched next year and that the design will “wow people.” [Business First]

Parts of South Clarksville could be the next Newport, Ky., or at least a bustling addendum to the Louisville metropolitan area. [News & Tribune]

People Freaking Out Over Humana

Aaron Wheatley estimates he spends four to five days on the Ohio River each week in his hunt for big catfish. [WDRB]

The Ford Motor Co. president and CEO Mark Fields outlined a bouyant vision for the automaker’s future and Louisville’s role during a lunch speech Friday. [C-J/AKN]

A mother’s love knows no bounds. WHAS11 was given permission to listen to a voice mail from Dashieka Ross—it was sent to her 20-year-old daughter Raveen Horn. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul stood before nearly 200 fans Saturday afternoon and made clear his intentions to force the expiration of the Patriot Act when the U.S. Senate meets for a rare session Sunday. [H-L]

According to newly released police interviews, the fatal shooting of a 16-year-old Louisville girl is linked to the death of a 14-year-old boy months earlier. [WLKY]

The new 21c in Durham looks pretty great. [HuffPo]

Almost 4,000 local GE workers are entering a critical few weeks for their future. Their union is about to start negotiating a new contract, fighting for better pay and benefits as GE looks to control costs. [WAVE3]

Ford Motor Company issued two new recalls Wednesday covering nearly 445,000 vehicles after receiving numerous complaint and incident reports, including at least four accidents related to loss of power steering and high underbody temperatures. [Consumerist]

Louisville Metro Council members unanimously approved an ordinance Thursday temporarily changing a flood rule that has left a number of homeowners with flood-damaged homes they can’t repair. [WFPL]

Saturday night’s statewide Republican dinner was supposed to be about unity, and it was, in more ways than one. But none of his former opponents showed up. [Ronnie Ellis]

Shares of Humana Inc. closed Friday with a 20 percent gain after a report by The Wall Street Journal that the Louisville-based health-benefits company is considering being acquired. [Business First]

Brandon Terry reaches his hand into a brown paper bag and tosses its contents onto his coffee table — a pack of syringes, sterile cotton swabs, a ream of condoms. He also has an orange box with hazardous warning stickers on the side. [News & Tribune]

JCPS & MSD Want More Of Your Money

The Jefferson County Board of Education may need to seek a 4 percent property tax revenue increase later this summer in order to balance its $1.4 billion budget for the 2015-16 year, according to a tentative budget approved by the board on Monday night. [WDRB]

For the second year in a row, the Metropolitan Sewer District board is looking at a 5.5 percent increase in customers’ rates. [C-J/AKN]

The American Red Cross is hoping you have what it takes to be a hero. Unless you’re gay, then you’re dead to them. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools has a budget that’s four times that of the Lexington-Fayette County government. [H-L]

Louisville police are working to identify a woman whose body was pulled from the Ohio River on Tuesday. [WLKY]

North American energy ministers said on Monday they had set up a working group on climate change and energy, a partnership designed to help Canada, the United States and Mexico harmonize policies. [HuffPo]

Terror can he heard in the voices of two women who called 911 and told the operator they were being shot at after leaving a gas station. [WAVE3]

The Distillery Innovation and Excise Tax Reform Act unveiled Tuesday would drop the current tax rate for distilled spirits from $13.50 per proof gallon to $2.70 per proof gallon on the first 10,000 gallons of productions for all distillers and then $9 per proof gallon after that. [The Hill]

A new health ranking of senior citizen health in the U.S. puts Kentucky near the bottom of the list. [WFPL]

One of the most basic facts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership is also the most important: It’s huge. [NPR]

Last week, I wrote about a study that indicated that women-owned businesses in Kentucky were growing more slowly than those in other states. [Business First]

The rows and rows of homemade chocolates nestled behind glass cases at Schimpff’s Confectionery soon will double. [News & Tribune]

Morning Bourbon & Needle Fun Stuff

A death investigation began shortly after a body was found in the Ohio River Tuesday morning. [WDRB]

The relocation of hundreds of government employees out of decaying office space is beginning, with the entire move expected to be completed by mid-fall. [C-J/AKN]

Eight authors who have written books about bourbon are scheduled to open a days-long event giving participants a behind-the-scenes look at Kentucky’s bourbon industry. [WHAS11]

Of course Hal Rogers opposes needle exchanges. Until his family members figure out how to profit from them, they won’t get his support. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year. [WLKY]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Two local TV station employees suffered minor injuries as a car ran a light and slammed into their live truck, flipping it onto its side. [WAVE3]

Charter Communications announced early Tuesday that it will acquire Time Warner Cable — a little over a month after a proposed deal between Comcast and Time Warner was killed by regulators. [The Hill]

The appeals period for the latest round of Louisville property tax assessments closes at the end of this month. Some appeals will be successful, but others will not. [WFPL]

Senate Republican leaders managed to scrape up enough votes just past midnight Saturday morning to put off decisive action on the NSA’s bulk collection of American phone records until next Sunday, May 31. But the hardliners — and make no mistake, they are taking an even harder and more absurd line than the NSA itself — have no endgame. [The Intercept]

Louisville leaders are encouraging foreign-born residents of Louisville to call their friends and family and tell them how much they enjoy living here. [Business First]

A Southern Indiana county at the epicenter of the worst HIV outbreak in Indiana history is seeking state permission to implement a yearlong needle exchange program. [News & Tribune]

The TV Folks Love Scaring Meemaws

Instead of scaring the absolute living shit out of the elderly people watching television, maybe start educating the community about needle exchanges? Maybe do something about educating folks on the proper way to discard used needles? [WDRB]

After working into the early hours of last Wednesday morning, paramedic Jon Tyson wheeled into his garage, plugged a large black power cord into his electric-powered Nissan Leaf and hit the sack. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe if we keep killing people we won’t have to worry about the poor or the sick. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul led a successful effort to block renewal of the Patriot Act early Saturday morning, followed by a deeply divided Senate leaving Washington without taking action on the National Security Agency’s soon-to-expire power to collect Americans’ phone records. [H-L]

The Indiana attorney general’s office says the state had to pay more than $1.4 million in fees to plaintiffs’ attorneys in its unsuccessful attempt to maintain its ban on same-sex marriages. [WLKY]

With more and more U.S. states facing public transit funding cuts despite record-breaking commuter demand, many transit systems are being forced to consider service cuts or fare hikes, both of which disproportionally impact low-income riders and neighborhoods. [HuffPo]

A family who lost their son has spent years turning their personal tragedy into a community event to spread positivity. [WAVE3]

The sleepy United States senators thought they were done voting. But then, around 1 a.m. on the Saturday before Memorial Day, Senator Rand Paul, Republican of Kentucky and presidential candidate, marched spryly to the Senate floor to let it be known that, no, he would not agree to extend the federal government’s bulk collection of phone records program. Not even for one day. [NY Times]

Louisville residents use public transportation at one of the lowest rates among the nation’s largest cities, according to new research from the University of Michigan. [WFPL]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

It’s time for a reminder about Adam Edelen and educational audits. An audit is NOT a forensic accounting investigation. It’s typically a random sampling that gets reviewed unless specific concerns are brought to light. Or, in the case of Montgomery County, not. Because specific concerns were deliberately ignored by Edelen’s team. When he says there was no fraud discovered? Remember: not a forensic accounting, not an in-depth investigation of every nook and cranny. [Business First]

Michael Crone asked who in the room knew a bully or a victim or a witness to bullying. Only a few hands raised. Crone knew better. [News & Tribune]

Glad A Local Will Be Your Governator?

Portland neighbors say they’re drowning in water bills that are twice the normal cost. The problems on one block uncovered a bigger issue for Louisville Water Company customers. [WDRB]

Which David Jones crony will get the job this time? Weeks after Superintendent Donna Hargens informed Helene Kramer that her contract was not being renewed, Jefferson County Public Schools has posted the position for its chief communications and community relations officer. [C-J/AKN]

Firefighters, police and Animal Control entered a home in the 2200 block of Beargrass Avenue just off Bardstown Road after hearing from multiple neighbors Tuesday. Neighbors were concerned after finding pet abandonment notices on the door, overgrown weeds in the yard and hearing constant barking inside the home. [WHAS11]

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five greater Clark County schools may close as part of a plan the superintendent believes will help the district. [WLKY]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

Some people are just the absolute worst. [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering what really happened to Jamie Comer in the gubernatorial primary? It’s much more simple than he would have you believe. [Page One]

Once again, Louisville has ranked poorly on the annual ranking of city park systems from a national group. [WFPL]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

Too many tables and too little kitchen space — that’s been a pain point for Big Four Burgers & Beer in Jeffersonville since it opened in December 2013. [Business First]

Samuel pointed to tattoos on his forearms and chest to count how many times he’s been incarcerated in Clark County jail. [News & Tribune]

Flood Gates Opened Against Norton

They may only stand a couple feet off the ground, have four legs and wet noses, but their lives might save the life of a veteran. [WDRB]

A man says in a lawsuit that Norton Healthcare lost a piece of his brain. [C-J/AKN]

Wondering just how terrible Donna Hargens’ communication skills are? Just check out this latest mess. A Louisville neighborhood remains shaken following a horrific accident Friday evening involving a young elementary student and her school bus. [WHAS11]

One wants to abolish the state office he is trying to win. Another started her own business at age 9. Four have state legislative experience, and two are Louisville businessmen. [H-L]

Police are investigating a fatal crash at Dr. W.J. Hodge and Magazine streets early Sunday morning. [WLKY]

If Flint, Michigan can run a pig for mayor, surely Louisville can run something similar. [HuffPo]

FEMA will soon open a second office in Jefferson County to help those recovering from spring flooding. [WAVE3]

American Pharoah is the king of the nation’s horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday. [NPR]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

For thousands of years, religious people have gathered together in houses of worship to sing songs, celebrate sacred rituals, and lift up prayers to God(s) on high. And on July 1, a new religious group in Indiana intends to do just that — but with a lot more emphasis on the “high” part. [ThinkProgress]

Expect to see Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville back in court on June 10. That’s as a long-running legal dispute between the two organizations continues to play out. [Business First]

Former Indiana state schools Superintendent Tony Bennett won’t face any criminal charges after an investigation into whether he misused state resources for his 2012 re-election campaign. [News & Tribune]

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]