MSD & Health? In The Same Sentence?

Assistant Superintendent Amy Dennes has announced that she will retire from Jefferson County Public Schools effective Aug. 1. [WDRB]

Under proposed changes announced Wednesday by Gov. Matt Bevin, many Kentuckians covered by Medicaid would… Here’s your chance to watch poor Kentuckians suffer. As well as your chance to watch the Republican Party of Kentucky’s drunken, delusional leadership foam at the mouth about how wonderful this is. Such a shame the KDP has no guts. [C-J/AKN]

Water Step and MSD continue to spread their knowledge of healthy drinking water and education as a professor from Nairobi, Kenya is in town hoping to better his community. [WHAS11]

Two members of the former Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees are suing Gov. Matt Bevin, claiming Bevin did not have the authority to remove board chairman Thomas Elliott of Jefferson County from the panel. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Four people were shot in a Louisville apartment Tuesday night. Two died and two others are recovering. [WLKY]

Democrats literally sat down on the floor of the House chamber on Wednesday — and forced the House into a temporary recess — as part of an effort to compel Republican leadership to vote on gun control legislation. [HuffPo]

WAVE’s teabagger web guy is taking time out of his busy day of posting mugshots of brown people to bring you the important story about mulch fires. [WAVE3]

This should be filled with schadenfreude. Long-time Republican activist and public relations executive Scott Jennings will emcee this year’s Fancy Farm Picnic political speaking on Aug. 6. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Gas and Electric has chosen a solar energy company as a partner in a new effort to offer solar energy to business and industrial customers. [WFPL]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! What is white privilege – and do white Americans believe they benefit from it? [BBC]

America’s economy has been on the rebound since the Great Recession, but Uric Dufrene still spies some downward trends. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Has Absolutely Turned Out To Be Worse Than Possibility City

What the hell is wrong with people?! [WDRB]

Only half of school-based certified staff think that Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens and other Central Office administrators are providing effective leadership in support of schools, according to a district survey that was posted online Friday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some University of Louisville folks have decided to sue Matt Bevin. [WHAS11]

Income inequality in Kentucky has grown significantly since 1979 and Fayette County is among the counties with the greatest inequality, says a study released last week by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman who survived a brutal attack in Hardin County five months ago was found dead Friday at her Warren County home. [WLKY]

As President Barack Obama approaches the end of his second term, there’s been much discussion of what his legacy will be. While much of that debate focuses on his foreign policy or his sweeping domestic policies, such as the Affordable Care Act, there’s another area where the 44th president has left a significant mark: making life easier for millions of working parents. [HuffPo]

Shenitrea Vaughn, 25, was shot in her home and has been recovering in Louisville. Doctors told her she may never walk again, but she’s fighting and learning how to live again. [WAVE3]

People in Orlando have dressed as guardian angels to protect the funeral of one of the Orlando shooting victims from homophobic protesters. [BBC]

New data show that while the wealthy in Kentucky keep earning more money, the poor continue to make even less. [WFPL]

Country and bluegrass music will ring from the hills of eastern Rowan County with a concert for the late Keith Whitley on Friday, July 1, at Poppy Mountain. [The Morehead News]

Louisville Metro Government will make $128,000 in loans to 13 local “microenterprises.” [Business First]

A new hearing room located within the Clark County jail for incarcerated inmates may save time and provide more security, courts and jail officials say. [News & Tribune]

Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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All The Kudos To Greg Fischer

Louisville Metro Police are responding to a report of a shooting in the Middletown area. [WDRB]

A Louisville Metro Police officer is in stable condition after he was shot late Saturday night in the Russell neighborhood after a foot chase with a Louisville man, police said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was the most insane story of the week locally, right? [WHAS11]

The publisher and author of escort Katina Powell’s book alleging that former Louisville men’s basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers for sex parties at the Cardinals’ dormitory have countersued Louisville students, saying they attempted to “extort” a monetary settlement in their action alleging Powell and the book devalued their education. [H-L]

Metro United Way and the Center for Women and Families announced a partnership for 211 to expand its services in Louisville. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton’s first speech since she won a majority of pledged delegates in the Democratic presidential race included remarks about how abortion relates to other issues. That’s groundbreaking for a presidential candidate. [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer is calling on Louisville and southern Indiana residents to join him in marching in the Kentuckiana Pride Parade on Friday as a show of compassion and unity. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

A woman who was shot by a Jefferson County constable in a Walmart parking lot has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the county government. The county will pay $75,000 in damages to Pedro and Tammie Ortiz on behalf of Constable David Whitlock, who shot Tammie Ortiz in November 2011. That brings the cost of the shooting for Jefferson County taxpayers to six figures, since the county has already paid more than $37,000 to Whitlock’s attorneys. [WFPL]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

A Louisville-based package-design company is expanding internationally. [Business First]

In the hopes of taking advantage of expected growth, the City of Charlestown could create a redevelopment authority board that would be able to borrow money and get to work. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Returned To Murder

It was a long, tumultuous school year for hundreds of JCPS bus drivers as they dealt with disruptive and abusive student behavior, often while trying to monitor traffic signals and navigate around pedestrians and other vehicles. [WDRB]

When it comes to hospital safety, Kentucky ranks worse than most other states, and no hospital in the Louisville area earned an “A” from a nonprofit group that recently evaluated scores of health-care institutions nationwide. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The woman killed in an early morning shooting has been identified. [WHAS11]

Celebrity chef and renowned restaurateur Bobby Flay has finalized a deal with WinStar Farm to acquire a minority interest in Grade I winner and Belmont Stakes entrant Creator. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali is remembered for his influence inside and outside of the boxing ring and for standing up for his principles in the face of fierce backlash. [HuffPo]

A cop got shot and suddenly the community cared about gun violence. Never mind the hundreds of other shootings. [WAVE3]

It is impossible to realize fully the significance of a time or events as one lives them. It’s only in looking back from a distance of time and perspective that you might be able to understand. [Ronnie Ellis]

Thousands of people crowded the streets of Louisville on Friday to pay their final respects to boxing legend Muhammad Ali. He died last week at age 74. [WFPL]

In the 1830s, the civilized world began to close debtors’ prisons, recognizing them as barbaric and also silly: The one way to ensure that citizens cannot repay debts is to lock them up. In the 21st century, the United States has reinstated a broad system of debtors’ prisons, in effect making it a crime to be poor. [NY Times]

Louisville has made another step toward bringing Google Fiber here. The Louisville Metro Council unanimously passed an ordinance Thursday that grants Google Fiber’s Kentucky affiliate a franchise for public right-of-way access to install communications infrastructure. [Business First]

For the first time since the 1970s, Clarksville selected a town manager to lead the town during a time of growth and redevelopment. Kevin Baity is expected to start work by the end of the month. [News & Tribune]

Puke Alert: Ali Funeral Ticket Scalpers

The Jefferson County Coroner’s office could soon be without a morgue in a battle between county and state. [WDRB]

When young Cassius Clay returned to his hometown in 1960 after winning an Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight, he was greeted by hundreds of fans at the airport, and a 30-car motorcade followed him to Central High School, his alma mater. [C-J/AKN]

People are so disgusting that they scalped tickets FOR A FUNERAL! It’s so gross we’re still thinking about it more than 24 hours later. [WHAS11]

Have you seen what’s going on in Lexington? Houses and other buildings on 10-acre lots must be excluded from the total acreage before an agricultural exemption on property taxes can be given to a homeowner, according to an official legal opinion from the Kentucky Department of Revenue to Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. [H-L]

Compassionate City has reached peak pedestrian accident. Getting hit by an LMPD cruiser takes the cake. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama mourned the death of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in a Saturday statement, remembering “The Greatest” for his talent and his spirit. [HuffPo]

Why we love Louisville: someone gets shot every day. [WAVE3]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

Demand for bourbon is putting pressure on the population of Kentucky’s white oak trees, which are used to make staves for whiskey barrels. [WFPL]

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Forty-five years after founding his fire-protection company, Richard Barber was considering an expansion plan. Meanwhile, an Indiana company was looking for growth opportunities. [Business First]

Getting some answers on the process and what’s coming forward for the Summit Springs development off State Street is the aim of a city council work session Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves A Good Pedestrian Accident

A young child is in critical condition after being hit by a vehicle in west Louisville. [WDRB]

The Memorial Day weekend wasn’t the deadliest on record by any stretch, but three deaths in unrelated incidents and a shooting near University of Louisville that left a college student seriously injured still made for a tragic holiday. The slayings increased Louisville’s 2016 homicides total to 47. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a story about a pedestrian accident in J-town. [WHAS11]

The U.S Department of Labor has funded a grant worth $3.4 million to help retrain out-of-work coal miners in Kentucky. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting at Lincoln and Colorado avenues. [WLKY]

As the nation once again honors American war dead on Memorial Day, instead of spouting the usual nationalistic platitudes that that U.S. soldiers fought to keep the country “safe and free,” perhaps we should analyze whether that is really true. [HuffPo]

If you’re going to run hyped up stories about suicide attempts, the least you could do is include resources for those in need. [WAVE]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Is the Portland renaissance real? An assessment of progress. [WFPL]

Courtrooms across the nation are using computer programs to predict who will be a future criminal. The programs help inform decisions on everything from bail to sentencing. They are meant to make the criminal justice system fairer — and to weed out human biases. [ProPublica]

Wait, this came as a surprise to people? Some folks must live in an alternate universe. [Business First]

Shelters across the state are losing government money due to a massive policy shift that emphasizes permanent housing for the homeless. [News & Tribune]