Maybe Greg Will Give Cordish More $

Guess this is a nice break from all the shootings? LMPD is investigating after at least one person was stabbed near Fourth Street Live! in downtown Louisville. [WDRB]

Philadelphia representatives with the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network visited Louisville on Wednesday as part of an investigation into claims of racial discrimination at the Cordish Co.’s downtown 4th Street Live venue. The group is conducting the fact-finding mission because Cordish is planning to build a casino in Philadelphia, and it is concerned about the project after reading The Courier-Journal’s July 17 story outlining allegations from more than half a dozen former employees who claim that the company uses practices to bar African Americans. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you ever thought Time Warner Cable wasn’t the worst. [WHAS11]

Police in Florida have arrested a Louisville priest who resigned after FBI investigators found child pornography on his computer. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after a man was fatally shot Saturday night outside of an apartment complex in southwestern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Americans use prescription drugs and they know these medicines help people, but they still don’t care much for pharmaceutical companies and think the industry is too money-hungry, according to a new survey. [HuffPo]

Everything is puppies and rainbows. “What we’re trying to do is break a world record with a Guinness World Record for the most paddlers in a lot. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky GOP’s central committee voted Saturday to adopt a presidential caucus system next year, clearing the way Republican Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and reelection at the same time. [Politico]

The grass is nearly knee-high and litter-covered on the vacant lots at the northeast corner of Wilson Avenue and Dixie Highway. The two shaggy lots aren’t unusual for the Park Hill neighborhood, where nearly 8 percent of properties — more than 340 parcels — are vacant or abandoned, according to a 2014 report from Network Center for Community Change. [WFPL]

The US government is launching a $5m (£3.2m) initiative to combat the use and trafficking of heroin, with a focus on prioritising treatment rather than punishment. [BBC]

Glenmary Country Club, a semiprivate club and golf course located off Bardstown Road south of the Gene Snyder Freeway, closed Wednesday and could remain closed indefinitely as a legal dispute surrounding the property continues. [Business First]

During their first official introduction to the proposal, New Albany City Council members were generally receptive to a request to aid in funding a plan designed to eliminate homelessness in Southern Indiana over the next decade. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

At Least Louisville Has Fine Bourbon

Louisville is obsessed with killing its people. Everything is puppies and rainbows, though. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville has been named one of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the South by Campus Pride Index. [C-J/AKN]

This weekend marked the annual Newburg Community Days. For more than 50 years, the Newburg community began a tradition of a homecoming weekend in August to celebrate unity, pride and welcome back former residents. [WHAS11]

Everybody freaked out about the minimum wage again this weekend. [H-L]

At least he wasn’t shot? Metro police are investigating after a man was stabbed Sunday night. It occurred in the 1800 block of Frankfort Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WLKY]

A St. Louis County policeman who boasted of how he spent his “annual Michael Brown bonus” has prompted an investigation by the department. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Possibility City doesn’t take public transportation seriously. [WAVE3]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

Responding to backlash over his leadership changes at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says he will appoint Prospect cattle breeder Jack Ragsdale as chairman emeritus of the committee he led for 41 years. [WFPL]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

Bourbon Women, a Louisville-based women’s group that’s focused on bourbon culture, will host its second annual “sip-osium” Friday, Aug. 21, through Sunday, Aug. 23. [Business First]

A representative for the recently formed Clarksville GOP filed a complaint Thursday regarding event permit requirements not being enforced by the town’s Planning and Zoning Department. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Track Crime & Scare Meemaw More Easily With Handy New Site

America Place, a Metro Louisville real estate developer, is wrapping up construction of its second, industrial building at River Ridge Commerce Center — and it’s buying up more land for another. [WDRB]

A new Louisville-area labor report shows that the area job market continues its strongest showing in a decade, with a jobless rate for June of just 4.7 percent, compared to 6.1 percent in June 2014. [C-J/AKN]

Maybe Possibility City will finally start taking its train crossings seriously. Don’t worry, not holding our breath. Two people were hospitalized with serious injuries Monday after their truck was hit by a train at a notoriously dangerous Louisville intersection. Police responded to the incident around 3 p.m. at Crawford Avenue in Buechel. [WHAS11]

The first Republican debate of the 2016 presidential election, said Sen. Rand Paul, will be between him and people who “want to blow up the world.” The Thursday night showdown will pit him against opponents who will “send half a million of your sons and daughters back” to Iraq. He promised that he will ask his Republican presidential rivals, face to face, whether they “want to always intervene in every civil war around the world.” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Construction on a new VA hospital is set to get underway in 2017. [WLKY]

Two congressmen behind a federal provision protecting state-legal medical marijuana operations are seeking an investigation into the Department of Justice’s continued crackdown on medical marijuana patients and providers, saying the DOJ may be in violation of federal law. [HuffPo]

An online crime tracking tool is now live on the Louisville Metro Police Department’s website. [WAVE3]

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit accusing a school resource officer in Kentucky of handcuffing two disabled children to punish them for behavior related to their disabilities, ACLU officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Four-year-old Evander Conroy was born with a neuroblastoma tumor compressing his spinal cord. Because of the tumor, he’s never been able to move his legs. This is worth another read. [WFPL]

Democrats unleashed a barrage of attacks here Saturday on Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin, calling him nearly every name in the book. [Ronnie Ellis]

Jeffersonville’s RiverStage had its biggest crowd ever on Saturday night, as a free concert and great weather brought an estimated 11,000 to 12,000 people to the riverfront. [Business First]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission will pony up more money to pay for the rising cost of the heavy-haul road. [News & Tribune]

People Dying & You’re Mad Over A Lion

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

An investigation by the Louisville Fire Department found GE could have done more to prevent a fire that destroyed a building at Appliance Park, but company officials say investigators are wrong and they have the video to prove it. [WDRB]

Fire investigators have blamed the total loss of a General Electric warehouse on outdated Appliance Park equipment that failed when fire crews rushed to the scene April 3. [C-J/AKN]

A shooting just before midnight has sent a victim to the hospital, only hours after fatal shooting in the same area. [WHAS11]

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

Metro police are investigating a stabbing at a south Louisville bar. But everything is puppies and rainbows in Possibility City. [WLKY]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

Louisville officials spent at least $2.5 million on additional security measures after a night of mob violence rocked the city in 2014, according to records obtained by WAVE 3 News. [WHAS11]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

United Parcel Service Inc. says it’s already working closely with retail customers on planning for this year’s peak season — even though there are indications of a softer shipping season this year. [Business First]

As statewide numbers showed a climbing trend, school districts in Clark and Floyd counties also realized an increase of children living in poverty. [News & Tribune]

Plans, Commissions, Studies, Buzzwords

Jefferson County Public School bus drivers vote Tuesday on a contract that offers more money for working troublesome routes. [WDRB]

Here’s yet another “plan” from Greg Fischer. Because we all know a plan from Washington that provides zero funding and only hype will solve this city’s murder problem. Fortunately, most people in Louisville see this for what it is. [C-J/AKN]

As stats continue to roll in like Thunder Over Louisville, it looks like event in its 26th year is proving to be a successful one. [WHAS11]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE? A dog’s collar and chain leash were found on the passenger side of a vehicle allegedly used to drag a dog to its death, a Lexington police officer testified Tuesday. [H-L]

Another day, another murder. Police remained at the scene of a shooting in the 2500 block of Duncan Street in Portland more than 12 hours after it was reported. [WLKY]

An evangelical Christian suggested in a video posted to Facebook that Christians should fight against gay rights with firearms. [HuffPo]

Another train death? A pedestrian died after being hit by a train in Pleasure Ridge Park Monday night. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and liberal stalwart Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) have reached a deal on a six-year highway funding bill. [The Hill]

If you plan on dining out Wednesday, there’s a chance a portion of your final bill will help fund patient services at The Healing Place, a drug and alcohol recovery shelter in downtown Louisville. [WFPL]

If this isn’t an honest-to-goodness crystal ball, it’s close. Neurobiologist Nina Kraus believes she and her team at Northwestern University have found a way — a half-hour test — to predict kids’ literacy skill long before they’re old enough to begin reading. [NPR]

Food delivery service might be one of the latest trends to pick up in Louisville. Takeout Taxi has been a staple in Louisville for more than 15 years and works with 102 restaurants in the area. And of course, some restaurants have their own delivery drivers. But it seems that in the last year, more food delivery services have come to Louisville. [Business First]

Residents of Clark and Floyd counties will soon get a taste of what the ongoing Ohio River Greenway Project could become — and it’s much more than a system of multi-use pathways and river views. [News & Tribune]

Is Fischer’s Omni Train Off The Rails?

If you’re wealthy and aren’t supporting this place, something is wrong with you. It is expected to be a much safer environment for women and children in danger. The Center for Women and Families is in the process of getting an extra layer of protection. [WDRB]

The Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau has set up an advisory council of representatives of some high-profile, out-of-town organizations to suggest what Louisville might do to improve its status as a meeting destination in hope of drawing more lucrative tourism business. [C-J/AKN]

If it’s not a gunshot death or a pedestrian death, it’s possibly a train death. [WHAS11]

The Council on Postsecondary Education is holding a series of public meetings around the state to get input on a new five-year plan to guide Kentucky’s higher education and adult education systems. Don’t worry, this won’t matter. Don’t get too excited about it. [H-L]

A new report shows the number of people who died from drug overdoses in Kentucky jumped 7 percent last year while the number of deaths attributed to heroin stayed about the same. [WLKY]

More states are considering restoring the right to vote to felons, with supporters saying that once their debt to society is paid they should be allowed to exercise a fundamental right. [HuffPo]

The design for the 30 story Omni building planned for downtown Louisville is suddenly uncertain after a regulatory panel delayed its approval for at least two weeks. [WAVE3]

Wondering why poor kids are unhealthy? The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday adopted a GOP amendment that would provide schools flexibility in meeting Department of Agriculture (USDA) rules for serving whole-grain products and reducing sodium levels. [The Hill]

Since 2010, vandals have caused more than $400,000 in damages at Louisville parks and community centers, according to data provided by Metro Parks. [WFPL]

The top electricity providers in the country are going renewable much more slowly than smaller companies, according to data reported Tuesday by sustainability group Ceres. [ThinkProgress]

A few weeks ago, we reported that the U.S. Department of Justice had filed a lawsuit that aims to block AB Electrolux’s acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. The government contends that the deal would lead to less competition, higher prices and fewer options for American buyers. Electrolux, for its part, has a plan to convince regulators otherwise. [Business First]

Another candidate has entered the New Albany race for mayor, but this one wants to break through the limitations of the current political system. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City: MURDER DEATH

A mission of the Hope by Hope organization is to let kids know that somebody loves them. [WDRB]

Metro planners have scheduled same-day, zoning-related public hearings for two major developments, one for Louisville’s second Costco store on Bardstown Road at the former Showcase Cinemas site and the other to allow a makeover of The 800 Apartments just south of downtown. [C-J/AKN]

Restaurant managers near Whiskey Row said having the street shut down all week was tough on business. [WHAS11]

The Davies household is like any other with small children and working parents at 5:30 p.m. — 10-month-old Caroline scoots across the floor; Kate, almost 3, looks frantically for her baby doll while their parents deal with dinner-making, dog-walking and bedtime-starting. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! THEY STILL DON’T REALIZE THEY’RE HOGGING YOUR DATA! It’s estimated that more than 20,000 children in Louisville have a parent in jail. [WLKY]

Police departments across the country that have spent years boasting about plummeting crime numbers are now scrambling to confront something many agencies have not seen in decades: more bloodshed. [HuffPo]

Five homicides in a five-day period earlier this week continues a violent 2015 in Louisville, and the increase in the city’s homicide rate is part of trend in major U.S. cities. [WAVE3]

The civil suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky on behalf of four Rowan County couples, two same-gender couples and two opposite-gender couples, against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and the county will be heard for a preliminary injunction hearing on Monday, July 13 at noon in U.S. District Court in Ashland. [The Morehead News]

Kentucky’s electricity generation landscape will look drastically different in the next five years, as coal-fired power plants retire or convert to natural gas. [WFPL]

The result of this is an incessantly repeating argument where a Black person says “Racism still exists. It is real,” and a white person argues “You’re wrong, I’m not racist at all. I don’t even see any racism.” [Click the Clicky]

Hilliard Lyons will provide training to its advisers in a series of six-month training modules taught by faculty of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. [Business First]

The town’s planning and zoning department finally got the go-ahead at Monday’s town council meeting to begin work on the first comprehensive plan update Clarksville has implemented in 23 years. [News & Tribune]