How’ll That Waterfront Property End Up?

Have you seen this puppies and rainbows b.s. with Donna Hargens? Giving this woman a free pass is the last thing Louisville needs right now. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has ordered 988 body cameras from Arizona-based TASER International ahead of its upcoming body camera pilot program, the department confirmed Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a building and a company that dominates the downtown Louisville skyline and the city’s business community. For more than five decades, the healthcare giant Humana and its employees have remained an important piece of this area’s economic fabric. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader endorsed Hal Heiner over Jamie Comer, which is likely to push Comer over the edge behind closed doors. [H-L]

Researchers say children in Louisville are being sold for sex. The KristyLove Foundation is a first-of-its-kind shelter in Louisville created by a woman who escaped the sex trade and turned her heartbreak into healing. [WLKY]

Faith in humanity, restored. A worker in a Qdoba fast food restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky was caught on video feeding a customer who was unable to feed herself. [HuffPo]

A Louisville police chief says there’s a lot of work to be done to ease tensions between law enforcement and the community. He believes body cameras could be part of the answer. [WAVE3]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Waterfront Development Corp. wants two of its downtown properties just south of Waterfront Park to be developed. The agency asked on Thursday for development proposals for the properties. [WFPL]

Ha! Daniel Grossberg has an ad highlighting Jacob Conway’s blackmail/extortion/threat attempt. [Click the Clicky]

American Pharaoh strolled out of his trailer and into the stables with ease when he arrived at Pimlico Race Course Wednesday afternoon. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council voted 5-2 last week to cut $150,000 from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter budget to help balance the county’s 2015 general fund. That won’t end well. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Can’t Stay Out Of The Dang News

Year-round employees in Jefferson County Public Schools — from central office staff and high school principals to custodians and some secretaries — will be forced to take two unpaid days in the coming school year under a proposal by Superintendent Donna Hargens. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Council’s government accountability committee wants answers about rising home assessments in certain neighborhoods. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police officers should start wearing their body cameras within the next couple months. [WHAS11]

Winter’s full fury arrived late in much of the country, but once it did it was relentless, forcing state transportation agencies to spend more than $1 billion to keep highways safe and passable, according to a first-of-its-kind survey. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A man has been indicted in the dragging death of his friend, a crime that has left two families stunned. [WLKY]

This screwed up Louisville story made the national news. [HuffPo]

An August 2, 2016 trial date has been set for a southern Indiana man accused of raping his girlfriend, killing her and then consuming parts of her body. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s two U.S. senators have introduced legislation they say will level the playing field for American bourbon and whiskey producers. [WKYUFM]

People born poor are more likely to stay that way if they live in Jefferson County than if they live in surrounding Bullitt or Oldham counties, according to a recent Harvard study. [WFPL]

In New York City, supporters of public libraries say that respect for — and repair of — the libraries is long, well, overdue. [NPR]

A federal judge in Florida has dismissed a lawsuit that alleges Maker’s Mark is being misleading by calling its product “handmade.” [Business First]

Floyd County Clerk Christy Eurton huddled her staff before the office opened at 8 a.m. Thursday for an important discussion. It wasn’t a talk about next week’s primary election — a task that requires hours of preparation and dedication to successfully and accurately conduct — but rather Eurton attempted to calm her employees about the budget cuts issued by the Floyd County Council the night before. [News & Tribune]

Fischer? Playing Favorites? Surely Not!

Should the East End bridge be a hazmat route? In Indianapolis, trucks carrying hazardous materials are banned from passing through downtown. A similar prohibition quietly took effect last year for the main northern Kentucky interstate into Cincinnati. [WDRB]

A lawsuit contends Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s office gave preferential treatment to prominent developer Bill Weyland, awarding his company a multi-million dollar contract for office space when it could have rented more space for less under an alternate deal. The lawsuit against the city, filed in Jefferson Circuit Court late Monday by real estate investors Mac Sawyers and Bill Lerner, contends the deal with Weyland was rigged and cost taxpayers more. [C-J/AKN]

Three people are recovering at the hospital after two shootings in Louisville Monday night. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Derby contenders Bolo, International Star, American Pharoah, Dortmund are featured in Tuesday’s report of activity and horses on the backside of Churchill as race preparations kick up a notch. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after human remains were found in a burned car in the 5000 block of KY 393, near US 42, outside Buckner. [WLKY]

In a new survey, more than half of self-identified Republicans said they didn’t think the Affordable Care Act is increasing the number of people with health insurance, with a fifth of respondents saying it has actually reduced the number of people with coverage. For the record, the evidence suggests these people are flat-out wrong. [HuffPo]

Several homeowners on East Riverside Drive plan to file a lawsuit against the Metropolitan Sewer District because they said they were unaware of a Metro Louisville flood ordinance that will force them to move from their home. [WAVE3]

If you were wondering about Greg Fischer being the most milquetoast and ineffective mayor in the country? You’d be mistaken. She’s actually in Baltimore, home of Cordish. [The Hill]

A Kentucky proposal to study the background levels of certain chemicals in urban soil has gotten funding from the federal government. [WFPL]

Want to hear audio of yesterday’s Supreme Court hearing on gay marriage? Transcript will be there, as well. [Part One & Part Two]

Here’s a non-shocker for ya: Greg Heitzman, executive director of the Louisville-Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District, announced during an MSD board meeting that he will retire later this year. [Business First]

Victoria Bennett had a plan. In 2010, realizing that she needed to follow her dream of graduating with an Indiana University degree, Bennett — then a political science student at Kennesaw State University near Atlanta — sold her house, gathered up her savings and prepared to move. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

Growing Rift Between Fischer & Reality

Par for the course with Greg Fischer: neglect until it’s time to tear them down. Three buildings on the site of an Omni hotel planned in downtown Louisville will be razed after engineers determined they pose “imminent safety concerns,” Louisville Metro government said Thursday. [WDRB]

Six months after retiring as Clark County sheriff and agreeing to plead guilty to two counts of making false statements to FBI, Danny Rodden signed a new plea agreement this week that calls for dropping a charge that he counseled the destruction of evidence to cover up an encounter with a prostitute. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police are crediting a man with saving a baby from a potentially dangerous situation over Easter weekend. That baby was found abandoned in the middle of the street in downtown Louisville. [WHAS11]

Venturing into the epicenter of Kentucky’s fight against heroin addiction, national drug czar Michael Botticelli on Thursday touted needle-exchange programs as effective grassroots initiatives to combat the spread of infectious disease and to steer heroin users into treatment. [H-L]

As Louisville’s murder rate continues to climb, local groups continue efforts to stem the violence in the community. [WLKY]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign will center on boosting economic security for the middle class and expanding opportunities for working families, while casting the former senator and secretary of state as a “tenacious fighter” able to get results, two senior advisers said Saturday. President Barack Obama all but endorsed her, saying “I think she would be an excellent president.” [HuffPo]

Louisville residents who live east of Interstate 65 inside the Watterson Expressway might see a jump in property taxes due to new assessments. One person who won’t is Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, whose home assessment dropped from $1.7 million $1.5 million, about a 12 percent dip. [WAVE3]

General Electric Co will shed most of its finance unit and return as much as $90 billion to shareholders as it becomes a “simpler” industrial business instead of an unwieldy hybrid of banking and manufacturing. [Reuters]

An expansive, multi-modal transportation plan is still in the works for Louisville, despite recent delays. [WFPL]

Seattle restaurant data demolishes wingnut arguments against a $15 minimum wage. [Think Progress]

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear has to be piling up the frequent flier miles these days. After an economic development trip to Japan late last year and a trip to Europe in early February, where he courted automakers in Germany and Sweden, Beshear announced Friday that he will return to Asia. [Business First]

New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook’s pay and benefits will remain suspended until her May hearing appealing a decision to fire her from the department. [News & Tribune]

If you missed it last week, the now former embattled Montgomery County Schools superintendent was fired with a list of sixteen pages of charges read against him. [Page One & More Page One]

JCPS Is In The National Spotlight Again

It has been 10 years since the exterior of Louisville’s U.S. Marine Hospital in the Portland neighborhood was restored, but the inside remains unfinished. [WDRB]

Violent crime in Louisville was up about 10 percent in 2014, breaking a downward trend the city had seen since 2012, police data shows. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out… President Barack Obama will be coming to Louisville April 2. [WHAS11]

“I’m going to move on my casino bill and ask for hearings on it during the interim. It’s part of my personal agenda,” Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said after the 2015 session ended. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Fifteen people have been charged as the result of a major securities fraud investigation conducted by the Indiana Securities Commission and announced Monday by Floyd County prosecutor Keith Henderson. [WLKY]

A new Virginia law may put PETA’s high-kill animal shelter out of the euthanasia business. [HuffPo]

Police are investigating a homicide after a man was found shot to death in a car. [WAVE3]

Ever since a court forced them to integrate in the 1970s, the city of Louisville and surrounding Jefferson County have tried to maintain diverse schools. [The Atlantic]

The Louisville Metropolitan Service Area’s population has increased by 2.8 percent since 2010, according to U.S. Census data released Thursday. “Most of the growth is happening on the periphery,” he said. “If you were in, what we call, the city, you’re not seeing any change at all.” [WFPL]

Democrats are apparently seething over this one. A Louisville woman has been appointed to serve on the newly created National Women’s History Museum Commission. Bridget Bush, a lawyer, was appointed by Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. [WLEX18]

$2.1 billion. That’s how much revenue Louisville-based Humana Inc. garnered from provider services — that is, services provided by doctors or other health care professionals —in 2014, according to its latest financial statement. [Business First]

“Get your bearings, Marine.” It’s the only phrase that can steady Cpl. Jerry Rochefort when he is on the verge of a psychogenic seizure, borne from the military service that causes his episodes. [News & Tribune]

Bonus: Another day, another JCPS school bus accident. [More WLKY]

How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]