When Will JCPS Get A Non-Awful Supe?

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee tabled a motion on Wednesday to change the city’s public nuisance law. [WDRB]

Another battle is brewing between County Attorney Mike O’Connell and a district court judge over Drive Safe Louisville, O’Connell’s revenue-generating traffic school. [C-J/AKN]

New data released by the Kentucky Department of Education shows mixed results for JCPS scores. Donna Hargens and her PR firm friends you’re paying for can’t hype this up. [WHAS11]

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

Is TARC the devil? Probably. A bicyclist was injured Thursday morning in an accident involving a TARC bus. That comes on the heels of a TARC-school bus accident. [WLKY]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

A recent murder has put Old Louisville in the spotlight as residents push for more police. Several complaints have already been made to police by people who live in the area. Those residents say they are frustrated over the lack of response. [WAVE3]

We might not be able to remember every stressful episode of our childhood. But the emotional upheaval we experience as kids — whether it’s the loss of a loved one, the chronic stress of economic insecurity, or social interactions that leave us tearful or anxious — may have a lifelong impact on our health. [NPR]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Congress is blocking legal marijuana in Washington, D.C. and maybe causing a spike in murders. [Mother Jones]

Let’s quit acting like Steve Beshear doesn’t already have someone picked to serve on UofL’s board of trustees. [Business First]

Floyd County has to submit a budget to the state by Oct. 28. And as of Monday night, it is still unknown how much will be set aside for the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter in 2016. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Backtracked On Something Else

Louisville-area buyers have the fewest choices of homes for sale in at least a decade, according to figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors, which covers mainly Jefferson, Oldham and Bullitt counties. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer’s chief of community services is backpedaling on a controversial proposal to scale back the number of city employees who oversee Louisville’s Neighborhood Place locations. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A transgender woman files suit against a Louisville nursing college. The lawsuit, filed Friday in Jefferson Circuit Court, alleges the Galen College of Nursing discriminated against Vanessa Gilliam for being transgender. The complaint also accuses the college of excluding Gilliam from using the women’s restroom even though she identifies as a female. [WHAS11]

The mantras uttered by participants in the Thoroughbred sales arena have taken on a broken-record tone: Good horses will bring the good money. Selectively still reigns. To get the very best of the best, one’s wallet is going to have to stretch. [H-L]

A clerk who police say shot and killed a man during an alleged attempted robbery returned to work Saturday. [WLKY]

At CVS pharmacies in 12 states, friends and family members of people suffering from opiate addiction will now be able to get the overdose reversal drug naloxone without a prescription. Just not in Kentucky. [HuffPo]

Jessie Boleware didn’t see her next door neighbor’s house aflame until she heard the sirens racing toward 4922 Garden Green Way on Friday night. [WAVE3]

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo renewed his call for national gun control legislation on Saturday as he delivered a eulogy for the top state attorney who was fatally wounded by a stray bullet in Brooklyn earlier this month. [Reuters]

A barge that teaches students about river ecosystems is beginning its fall tour in Louisville this week. [WFPL]

Renewable energy has for the first time surpassed coal in supplying the UK’s electricity for a whole quarter, according to government statistics released on Thursday. [The Guardian]

A 32.5-acre site off Jefferson Boulevard near Fern Valley Road has been targeted for a new industrial business park that could attract logistics companies or a Ford Motor Co. supplier. [Business First]

Three men accused of stealing political signs from yards in the Clarksville Parkwood subdivision were arrested Thursday. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Leadership Is Still The Worst

Everyone pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster that someone with no ties to Greg Fischer runs this program so it stays on track and comes to fruition. Google Fiber announced it was considering bringing its high speed internet service to Louisville earlier this month and now the company is hiring managers for the project. [WDRB]

It looks like Louisville may go another year without a monitoring program for airborne toxic chemicals, as city and state officials keep looking at each other as the future funding source. [C-J/AKN]

Family members of five people who died when a boat capsized on the Ohio River say in federal court documents that the placement and condition of a construction barge caused the tragedy. [WHAS11]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

She’s old enough for that? Jennifer Lawrence is the latest Louisville native to be honored by the Greater Louisville Pride Foundation’s Louisville Hometown Heroes series. [WLKY]

Daniel Suddeath has been hired as editor of the Glasgow Daily Times, effective Tuesday, Sept. 29. Suddeath, a staff writer for the News and Tribune in Southern Indiana for the past seven years, also served as editor for Southern Indiana Business Source magazine during that time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Neighbors who say there has been an increase in crime in their area are frustrated and now they are taking action by starting a neighborhood watch. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles officials on Tuesday called homelessness an “emergency” in the city and proposed spending $100 million to provide permanent housing and shelters for the city’s 26,000 indigent. [Reuters]

State Auditor Adam Edelen says he’s looking into the financial management of the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the university’s $1.1 billion endowment, and the university’s board of trustees as part of an ongoing investigation. [WFPL]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

It looks like another expansion is on the way at Ford Motor Co.’s Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The city’s mayoral candidates did not hold back during Thursday night’s League of Women Voters debate, answering moderated questions and sending accusations the other’s way. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Still Loves Shooting People

Saturday was a big day for Louisville’s gay community. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Police have recorded 77 suicides this year, a 30 percent jump compared to this time a year ago and one more than the city totaled all of last year. The suicide total also far exceeds the city’s homicide total this year, which stood at 53 as of Sept. 17. Officials at the state and city level, however, admit Louisville’s suicide count could be higher given that the police do not investigate all deaths that turn out to be ruled suicides. [C-J/AKN]

One of the three teens accused of violently beating a Louisville homeless man in June says they did it as a game. [WHAS11]

One year ago, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway met with a group of out-of-state trial lawyers who urged him to pursue litigation against the oil industry over a now-disused gasoline additive — methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE — found to contaminate groundwater. [John Cheves]

Louisville police are investigating after a man was shot early Saturday morning. [WLKY]

Nearly 1,000 people showed up at the Islamic Center of Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday to paint over anti-Muslim graffiti that appeared Wednesday night, according to a center director. [HuffPo]

Bleachers were packed at Western High School’s home football game Friday evening, hours after an anonymous active shooter threat. [WAVE3]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin is up on the air with his first television ad of the general election following weeks of ads by his Democratic opponent Jack Conway and those on his behalf by the Republican Governor’s Association. Don’t look for any surprises. The ad relies on trusted Republican strategy of tying any Democratic opponent to President Barack Obama, who is deeply unpopular in Kentucky. [Ronnie Ellis]

Somi Babar huddled Thursday morning with a group of mothers, peering at the white exterior walls of the Louisville Islamic Center. [WFPL]

Federal Reserve policymakers appeared deeply divided on Saturday over how seriously problems in the world economy will effect the U.S., a fracture that may be difficult for Fed Chair Janet Yellen to mend as she guides the central bank’s debate over whether to hike interest rates. [Reuters]

Oh, that won’t be terrible at all. A new television show that connects Louisville-area entrepreneurs with local financial backers has named initial members of its panel. [Business First]

A company that operates dozens of nursing homes across Indiana — including three in Clark County — fired its top executive Friday, three days after federal agents searched his home and the company’s headquarters. [News & Tribune]

UofL’s Internal “Review” Is Exactly What You Think It Is

The plan has been in the works for years, but now boaters are finally seeing new docks take shape on Jeffersonville’s riverfront. [WDRB]

What? Another instance of Greg Fischer throwing blame while ignoring constituents? Surely not. [C-J/AKN]

The gays probably caused this. Hundreds shed their shirts and walked three miles through the Highlands topless, bringing the national #FreetheNipple movement to the streets of Louisville. [WHAS11]

Oh, look! It’s Terry Holliday! The man who enabled Joshua Powell and allowed him to wreak havoc. Trying to give advice to Lexington. A real shame no one in the media has bothered to highlight those very real and verifiable ties. [H-L]

You know Possibility City loves a pedestrian death. Police are investigating after two pedestrians were found lying in the road in the 5300 block of Alanadale Drive around 3:15 a.m. Sunday morning. [WLKY]

Thousands of migrants and refugees streamed into Germany on Sunday, many traveling through Austria from Hungary where they had been stranded against their will for days, while European Union governments argue over how to respond. [HuffPo]

More than 100 people hit the ground running, or walking, in west Louisville on Saturday morning for a pair of good causes – their own health and the March of Dimes. [WAVE3]

A group of religiously affiliated nonprofit organizations in Indiana must comply with the Affordable Care Act’s provision allowing their employees to get insurance coverage for contraception, despite their religious objections, a federal appeals court ruled on Friday. [Reuters]

Woah, a mainstream outlet correctly identified cyanobacteria! Erica Peterson deserves an award. [WFPL]

Milwaukee is at the top of the list violent cities, with a 76 percent increase in homicides. [NPR]

Just what UofL needs! Another internal “review” to find absolutely nothing wrong. Kind of like every internal review ever. [Business First]

The small cluster of historic homes at Pearl and Maple streets won’t be empty for much longer. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City’s Back To Shooting Everyone

The future of a Louisville YMCA branch is in jeopardy as traffic at the Berrytown location continues to be low despite numerous efforts to boost attendance. [WDRB]

The more attention news directors give this troubled kid, the worse he gets. It’s almost worse than the way Louisville media folks try to eat each other alive out in fits of jealousy and bitterness. [C-J/AKN]

Two men accused in a Louisville bar attack say they were offered money to carry out the crime. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

Police are investigating two shootings and are not yet saying if the two incidents are related. [WLKY]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

A new festival is set to highlight a multitude of talented artists from Louisville and across Kentucky. The Golden Culture Art and Music Festival is making history as it brings attention to an often over-looked local music subculture: hip-hop. [WAVE3]

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

By the time Tom Jurich, vice president and director of athletics for the University of Louisville, addressed the media at a news conference this morning, word had spread that U of L planned a $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [Business First]

In the small Parke County town of Rockville, population 2,591, police officers are donning new body cameras before they head out on patrol. [News & Tribune]

Russell’s A Start And A Big Step Forward

The number of people being shot in Louisville is on the rise, according to Louisville Metro Police. [WDRB]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out about what James Procell, of UofL’s music lie-berry, discovered. [WHAS11]

Sometimes the best ideas really do come while enjoying a glass of bourbon. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of zombies took over the Highlands on Saturday night, but it’s what some of the undead left behind that has neighbors upset. [WLKY]

Louisville is the 4th-most segregated city in America (or the metro area is), apparently, and no one wants to talk about it. When are we going to talk about it? Or are we always just going to hold feel-good events and talk about puppies and rainbows on the teevee instead of trying to improve life for people living in the West End? [HuffPo]

We often hear the stories of homicide victims, but the stories of people who actually survive violent attacks often are left untold. [WAVE3]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

In about a month, Metropolitan Sewer District officials will wrap up a short-term program aimed at buying out homeowners whose houses flood frequently. [WFPL]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Revitalizing Russell — once a bustling economic center in West Louisville — has been a hot topic for some community leaders for years. But the buzz seems to be increasing lately as several projects have committed substantial investment to the neighborhood. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Parks Authority President Ed Zastawny says he wants the public to know the city only had an issue maintaining the 10th Street medians once the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission stopped taking care of them early last year. [News & Tribune]