Let’s Put On Our Fake Derby Happy Faces

Surprise! There are still people who ignorantly believe keeping a liquor store out of their neighborhood is going to solve all of their problems. Like her mother, Jessica Green is apparently delusional. Metro Councilwoman Jessica Green is trying to prevent property at 1200 S. 28th Street from becoming a liquor store. But the owner said he refuses to let it sit vacant any longer. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer wants to expand Louisville’s smoking ban to include electronic cigarettes and hookah, he announced Friday morning. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This is not compassionate. There’s nothing compassionate about Louisville at the moment. Not when there are countless deaths from guns, drugs and automobiles. Anyone who attempts to claim everything is puppies and rainbows out to be immediately taken to a physician for an evaluation. [WHAS11]

Noah Greenhill, 10, stood attentively Tuesday morning at the side of Gov. Matt Bevin in the state Capitol as he watched the governor ceremonially sign into law a bill that will help reduce his medical expenses. The governor gave the first pen he used to sign the bill to the youngster from Pikeville. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! What the hell is wrong with people!? [WLKY]

Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was sentenced to just one year for safety violations at a West Virginia mine that led to the deaths of 29 miners in a 2010 explosion. Now, one woman is working to push Blankenship to reflect on his crimes. Ann Bybee-Finley, who grew up in Hurricane, West Virginia, launched a campaign called “Making one year count” on Wednesday, calling on people to send letters to Blankenship every day that he is in prison. [HuffPo]

The way your child is graded in Jefferson County could soon change – again. [WAVE3]

President Obama made headlines recently as the first U.S. leader to visit Cuba since the communist revolution. The two neighboring countries have resumed diplomatic relations and are taking cautious steps toward full normalization, including trade and travel. [Richmond Register]

Yes, a liberal Democrat can win a statewide election in Kentucky but it will not be Sellus Wilder. If you weren’t sure there could be a worse statewide candidate than Jim Gray, here you go. You can thank Christy Brown for hyping up his candidacy. [WFPL]

Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of his ambassador to the United States who was behind Francis’ controversial meeting with Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who went to jail rather than comply with a court order to issue same-sex marriage licenses. [TPM]

A project that could cost as much as $87 million to construct along the southeast corner of the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center in Jeffersonville should enter its next phase this fall. [Business First]

After a several-hour-long executive session in the morning and early afternoon, the River Ridge Development Authority held a public meeting Friday to give site project updates. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Loves It Some Gun Violence

The Louisville Metro Planning Commission has stopped reviewing “conservation subdivisions” in Jefferson County while it looks into whether regulations approved in 2008 achieve a goal of saving green space. [WDRB]

Responding to public concerns about lead in public drinking water supplies, the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet has created a work group to review existing government regulations or practices and potentially make recommendations for changes. But the agency that created the work group, which includes a variety of public officials, intends to exclude the general public – potentially violating the state open meetings law. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro Police confirm that one woman has died and two men are injured after a shooting in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Hall of Fame jockey Calvin Borel, a three-time winner of the Kentucky Derby, has informed his agent, Larry Melancon, that he is retiring effective immediately. [H-L]

A bill giving death benefits to families of EMS workers killed in the line of duty has been signed into law by the governor. [WLKY]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

A man was shot in front of a Louisville clothing store on Saturday over a pair of new athletic shoes, Louisville Metro Police said. [WAVE3]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

This could be one of the dumbest moves from JCPS yet and Allison Martin isn’t helping matters. Jefferson County Public School officials are declining to discuss gang activity in local schools with a Louisville Metro Council committee. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

While Clarksville continues to focus on revitalizing the community through extensive development and redevelopment efforts, the town is making plans to ensure proper infrastructure is in place to improve conditions and handle growth. [News & Tribune]

Huh? Gang Activity? What Gang Activity?

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad says the amount of violent crime in the city has increased 4.4 percent in comparison with 2015, according to the most recent data. [WDRB]

Here’s a story from a week ago that essentially got ignored. Looking to trim labor costs, Ford Motor Co. is offering hourly workers with at least 8 1/2 years of service a $70,000 lump sum payment to take a voluntary retirement or separation this year. [C-J/AKN]

Seven Counties is continuing its fight against addiction specifically with heroin and opioids. [WHAS11]

The state Senate was minutes away from adjourning Tuesday night when Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer announced that a special visitor wanted to address the chamber — Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An urban farm is coming to Louisville’s Hazelwood neighborhood and taking over the former Iroquois housing site. [WLKY]

Republican front-runner Donald Trump said Tuesday he doesn’t plan to honor his pledge to support the party’s nominee for president if it’s not him. [HuffPo]

Seems like only yesterday Jerry Abramson and crew were claiming gangs were not a thing in Possibility Compassionate City. Nothing to see here, move along, puppies and rainbows. [WAVE3]

With homelessness surging and rent prices skyrocketing nationwide, one congresswoman is urging her colleagues to rapidly increase federal funding for affordable housing in hopes of stemming the tide. [ThinkProgress]

Last month, for the first time in about 15 years, Kentucky changed its fish consumption advisories. There are high levels of mercury in most of the commonwealth’s lakes and rivers. But there is a conflict between what state agencies are saying and what they’re doing: On one hand, the state is warning people not to eat large amounts of fish because it contains the toxic chemical. On the other, state agencies are suing the federal government over pollution controls that would keep mercury out of waterways in the first place. [WFPL]

Grassroots Republicans are growing frustrated with their Washington Beltway counterparts, who they think are giving up the fight for the White House. [The Hill]

HOWWWWW much money is KentuckyOne health spending on this ongoing PR campaign? It’s never-ending, apparently. [Business First]

Jim Wathen said two years ago he had an idea to stabilize Floyd County’s fiscal future — sell Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services. That idea didn’t go too far at the time. [News & Tribune]

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Murder Is Just Way Normal Here, Right?

A Louisville murder victim was recently involved in another high profile case. [WDRB]

Hundreds of new MSD customers have been getting wastewater and drainage services without being billed for them, agency officials said Monday, creating an issue with the Louisville Water Co. that handles billing for both. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO The coroner has identified a man who was shot and killed in the 300 block of East Oak Street on Sunday, March 27. [WHAS11]

Attorney General Andy Beshear has hired another veteran of his father’s administration to replace Tim Longmeyer, the former deputy attorney general who resigned and is now facing federal bribery charges. [Press Release & H-L]

Health officials say the number of cases of whooping cough in northern Kentucky has reached record levels recently. [WLKY]

Young women of color face particularly tough barriers to success in school, work and life. Now one foundation is working with them to break them down. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. A man was shot and killed Monday afternoon in the Hallmark neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Turns out, one of the people at the center of the latest political scandal in Kentucky is knee-deep in something really exciting. Spoiler alert: it’s probably not entirely safe for work. [Page One]

Brenda and Robert Erickson filtered into City Hall last Thursday evening, a few minutes before the Louisville Metro Council began its regular meeting. [WFPL]

On November 19, 2014, the door clanged shut behind David Sesson and Bernard Simmons. Sesson put his hands through the food slot to have his handcuffs removed. Both men were in “disciplinary segregation,” a bureaucratic term for solitary confinement, at Menard Correctional Center in southern Illinois. But unlike many in solitary, Sesson and Simmons wouldn’t have a moment alone. [The Marshall Project]

Greater Louisville Inc. announced the promotion of several employees Monday. [Business First]

Animal control officers will have to wait at least two more weeks before they’re able to enforce new Jeffersonville laws on animal welfare. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Local Repubs Love The Racist

Before she retired, Fay Allen regularly drove from her home in Jeffersonville to her job in downtown Louisville. She estimates she now makes about 10 trips a month across the Ohio River, mostly for volunteer work. [WDRB]

A day before his twins’ sixth birthday celebration, Donald Mattingly Jr., 36, was riddled with bullets. Nine months later, his killer remains free, as do those responsible for nearly half of the homicides in Louisville last year. [C-J/AKN]

Landscape awards don’t matter when your administration is a walking disaster. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump won a tight battle with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz in Kentucky’s Republican presidential caucus late Saturday night. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents in one Fern Creek neighborhood are stepping up security after Metro police found a handful of belongings that were stolen. [WLKY]

Talk about breaking barriers in the world of fried chicken. [HuffPo]

Customers inside the Walgreens on the Outer Loop left in shock Thursday after a woman, upset over her transaction, started punching and biting the clerk. [WAVE3]

Heads-up, Louisville Metro Government. When homeless people cluster and set up stable tent camps, most American cities eventually send garbage men, cops, and social workers to tear the camps down, kick out the occupants, and even destroy their belongings. But in Indianapolis, such encampments are now protected from the sudden, destructive approach that so many other cities use to break up unsightly homeless communities. [ThinkProgress]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is shuttling a proposed surplus spending plan on to the full council for final approval. [WFPL]

A Louisville House Democrat filed two bills Monday in an attempt to block Gov. Matt Bevin’s plan to dismantle the state health exchange, kynect, and revamp how Kentucky delivers Medicaid. [The Morehead News]

A new rail yard on in Jeffersonville will serve as a transfer and loading terminal for Louisville & Indiana Railroad Co. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council will introduce two ordinances and one resolution at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Outrage Reaching Fever Pitch

Some Jefferson County Public Schools board members are raising questions about the district potentially misusing Every 1 Reads funds. Surprise! David Jones doesn’t think it’s a big deal because $420,000 to him is like $420 to you. And Allison Martin blaming someone else? No surprise there. [WDRB]

No amount of positive spin stories like these getting shopped around by people like Mark Hebert will improve UofL’s scandal-ridden mess of a leadership debacle. The University of Louisville produced 10 Fulbright scholars this school year — the same number as Stanford — and ranking it among the 42 highest universities in the United States. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Flashing red and blue lights and police choppers were all creating quite a scene at the Big Four Bridge on Saturday. [WHAS11]

An affidavit filed in federal court says the shooting of a U.S. postal worker in Louisville was the result of a drug deal. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents on both sides of the gun debate showed up at a committee meeting Tuesday to voice their opinion on whether guns should be allowed inside Town Hall. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell draws a fine line between their nefarious calls for delay and his wise calls for delay. [HuffPo]

Another day, another pedestrian struck on the streets of Compassionate City. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s troubled public pension funds are fighting a bill requiring them to disclose performance fees paid to outside asset managers and use more transparent methods when selecting those managers. [Reuters]

The attorney hired to represent Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky in a lawsuit over abortion services says he’ll ask a judge to dismiss the case. [WFPL]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

We at Louisville Business First often report about programs to encourage entrepreneurs in the area, and now those efforts are gaining broader attention. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman gave a shout-out to Louisville’s startup community in his Feb. 17 column. [Business First]

There was only one winner Thursday night at the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s Teacher of the Year recognition dinner. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Is Always Ruining Everything

An empty lot along Bicknell Avenue will soon become a place addicts can find the city’s needle exchange program once a week. It will be the third site Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness has opened for the program, but reaction in this area has been mixed. [WDRB]

Seems a lot of people missed this story from a couple weeks ago. Officials with the already financially strapped Waterfront Development Corp. fear they may not get the pledged $350,000 contribution from the third Gallopalooza program to help pay for putting special lighting on the Big Four Bridge. At the same time, they are trying to convince the General Assembly to restore more than $800,000 in state funding for the waterfront agency that was not included in the new budget that Gov. Matt Bevin recently announced. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Department of Revenue has slowed down issuing state tax refunds because of concerns of identity theft and other forms of fraud. [WHAS11]

The state’s Kynect health insurance exchange is a financially unsustainable boondoggle that has cost $330 million, Gov. Matt Bevin’s top health officials told lawmakers at the Capitol Tuesday. An hour earlier, at a news conference down the hall, several Kentucky farmers described Kynect as a lifeline that provided their families with affordable health insurance. [John Cheves]

More arrests are expected Wednesday morning following a massive drug bust in Hardin and Nelson counties. [WLKY]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump on Tuesday praised two audience members who tackled a protester at his rally in South Carolina. [HuffPo]

The story sounds familiar. A hotel criticized for crime, and a city changing a law to hold the owners accountable. [WAVE3]

Providers of community mental health have no choice but to sit and wait in fear of how state budget cuts will affect them, said Pathways Inc. CEO Kimberly McClanahan. [Ashland Independent]

The head of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System says the schools are key to building a stronger workforce, which translates into a stronger middle class — this is despite a steep decline in enrollment. [WFPL]

House Republican Floor Leader Jeff Hoover, R-Jamestown, went out of his way to praise a Democratic colleague with whom he frequently disagrees — and in doing so subtly suggested most Democrats are afraid to take tough votes or stand up for their convictions. [Ronnie Ellis]

One more state has approved Aetna Inc.’s acquisition of Humana Inc. Florida’s insurance regulator has given the approval and required no divestitures, according to Dow Jones Business News. [Business First]

The Department of Local Government Finance certified Floyd County’s 2016 budget order and tax rates Thursday, paving the way for on-time property tax bills. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]