Transparency Is Not A Thing In Possibility City

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found with a gunshot wound inside the Hampton Inn on Jefferson Street in downtown Louisville just before 11 o’clock Monday night. [WDRB]

Because there’s no such thing as transparency in Louisville! The question of whether the Metropolitan Sewer District was violating the state’s open records rules from its board members’ use of private email accounts won’t be answered by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway. [C-J/AKN]

People are still freaking out about the murder on Ewing Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Fayette County Public Schools have cancelled classes for the rest of the week, according to the district’s website. [H-L]

There was an open conversation between African-American veterans and Congress Wednesday morning in Louisville. [WLKY]

A federal judge’s ruling halting the president’s executive actions on immigration did little to persuade either party in Congress to publicly back down from a budget standoff. [HuffPo]

Electrolux, the Swedish company buying General Electric’s appliance division, will make Louisville’s Appliance Park a key part of future plans, the company’s leader said Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Louisville is the 11th-poorest city in the United States. But it’s still all puppies and rainbows and whatever else Greg Fischer’s spokesgays can come up with on any given day. [CBS News]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking parents whether an A letter grade should be based on a 90-100 point scale instead of the 93-100 scale currently used. [WFPL]

Scott Welk, who brought forward the lawsuit on Tuesday in California federal court, accused the Jim Beam Brands of violating California’s False Advertising Law with its handmade claims thus forcing him to pay a premium price for Jim Beam’s white label Bourbon. [The Spirit Business]

The elephant in the room: forcing everyone at the dying newspaper to re-apply for their jobs despite saying that wouldn’t happen. And laying Jim Carroll off because Kentucky doesn’t need to know anything about Washington, D.C., obviously. [Business First]

Two challenges have been filed against Clarksville Town Council candidates — Rick Schafer running for District 2 and Dave Disponett running for District 4. [News & Tribune]

Let’s Take Racism More Seriously, Louisville

Officials with Jefferson County Public Schools unveiled a plan to the school board Monday on where to place two new innovative schools that will open in time for the 2015-16 school year. [WDRB]

The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday the crew of a UPS jet that crashed last year in Birmingham, Ala., made mistakes during the critical pre-dawn approach to the runway, adding that the fatigue of the pilot and co-pilot were factors in the accident. [C-J/AKN]

With the appliance sale of General Electric to Electrolux, many employees are wondering what it will mean for them in the future. [WHAS11]

Republican Agriculture Commissioner James Comer formally entered the 2015 race for governor on Tuesday in front of hundreds of hometown supporters in an ambitious campaign rollout more than a year before the election. [WKYT]

Will this Josh Young saga never end with local media??? [WLKY]

Atmospheric volumes of greenhouse gas hit a record in 2013 as carbon dioxide concentrations grew at the fastest rate since reliable global records began, the World Meteorological Organization said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Six decades ago a family’s home was attacked in a neighborhood ripped apart by racism. Now, researchers at the University of Louisville are retelling the story about two families and their fight for desegregation and need the public’s help. [WAVE3]

The Louisville ECHO program (Louisville is Engaging Children Outdoors), Louisville Metro Parks and Recreation’s signature environmental education initiative for fourth-grade students, has received significant support this year with $41,295 in grant funding from the U.S. Forest Service, and $7,500 Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. [Press Release]

Starting this week, members of the Jefferson County Board of Education are hosting community conversations across the district. [WFPL]

WDRB in Louisville, Kentucky has hired six journalists from print publications to contribute to its website during the last two years, said Barry Fulmer, the station’s news director. [Poynter]

A University of Louisville cancer researcher, Dr. Anthony Dragun, is trying to make treatment easier for breast cancer patients. [Business First]

An outside firm will investigate New Albany’s police department for possible workplace violations after a state police investigation cleared two officers accused of working on private jobs on taxpayer time. [News & Tribune]

Bridge Tolls? What Tolls? Nothing To See Here

The Southern Indiana chamber of commerce is asking state officials to consider changes to traffic and toll plans in an effort to ease the Ohio River Bridges Project’s financial burden on local businesses. [WDRB]

Who in Possibility City believes the Gannett split doesn’t have a serious impact on the company’s “local commitment”? That’s right — absolutely no one. Not even the people who work at A Kentucky Newspaper. [C-J/AKN]

A man form Colorado is staking his time, money and experience on a farm in Kentucky all to make medicine from hemp. [WHAS11]

Another historic bourbon distillery is coming back to life in Lexington. [H-L]

Metro police arrested a New Albany woman on a cruelty to animals charge. [WLKY]

Less than half of borrowers with the most common type of federal student loan are repaying their debt on time, new data released by the U.S. Department of Education show. [HuffPo]

Lots of land have been sitting vacant in St. Matthews since the 1980s. Many people believed the lots could not be built on, but it turns out that’s not the case. [WAVE3]

Some shysters in Louisville are back at it and making false claims. [The ‘Ville Voice]

ESL students are Jefferson County Public Schools’ fastest growing demographic—and major drivers of that growth are unaccompanied minors crossing the southwestern U.S. border and refugees like Hussein, officials say. [WFPL]

Are you a generous person or someone who loves animals? Help Jackson the Dachshund out ASAP, as he needs surgery! Jessica has been a tireless advocate for years and has definitely given more than she’s received. Let’s all pitch in. [Go Fund Me!]

Rumors about the potential sale of GE Appliances have been circulating all summer. A few weeks ago, Bloomberg had this report about it. [Business First]

In terms of the averages, the only benchmark New Albany-Floyd County Schools didn’t make were their own 2013 ISTEP+ scores. [News & Tribune]

Hot Mess Called Cordish Is Just Making Excuses

Yes, kids, your tax dollars paid someone to say your tax dollars are hurting your tax dollars. KFC! Yum Center has actually “added competition and hurt” another taxpayer-subsidized entertainment venue in downtown Louisville: 4th Street Live. That’s according to a long-time Louisville real estate appraiser hired by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore-based developers that own and operate 4th Street Live. [WDRB]

Four crosswalks along Fourth Street are going to become works of art. The crosswalks at the intersections of Fourth at Broadway, York, Breckinridge and Kentucky streets will be painted as part of the SoBro ArtWalks Contest, which is seeking crosswalk designs. [C-J/AKN]

A plea deal has been reached for the former Louisville Metro Housing director and her mother. [WHAS11]

In 1964, former Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and a group of investors paid $2 million to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Col. Harland Sanders for his legendary chicken business and his secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. [H-L]

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville announced Tuesday a $1 million gift from Sam Swope, founder of Sam Swope Auto Group. [WLKY]

The Gannett Company said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its print operations, including USA Today, becoming the latest media company to break itself up. [NY Times]

As heroin deaths continue to rise throughout the Commonwealth, interest in an overdose antidote known as Naloxone or Narcan is being considered among law enforcement officials. [WAVE3]

Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Greg Fischer has no idea what Louisvillians want or need. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s statewide rail plan is ready for review at the Transportation Cabinet. [Click the Clicky]

Owners of vacant and blighted properties in Lexington may soon face higher taxes. [Business First]

The Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency wants to hear from you. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Still Playing Games With LMAS Scandal

A Jefferson County jury deliberated for about an hour Thursday before finding in favor of The Courier-Journal and its parent company in an age discrimination lawsuit brought by a newspaper executive who was fired in 2011. [WDRB]

Thought Cordish was gonna do all that? The city is moving to find a new life for the long-dormant, historic Louisville Gardens, a century-old, former armory and event venue where Elvis Presley performed and Martin Luther King Jr. spoke. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD released in a statement Wednesday afternoon 22-year-old Danielle Cogswell may have died from a, “suspected overdose.” [WHAS11]

Churchill Downs bought a stake in Saratoga Harness and the deal could lead to financial interest in several more casinos. [H-L]

Sentencing is set for September for a JCPS resource teacher found guilty of murdering her husband. [WLKY]

The cheerleader death story has apparently gone national. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members said they will pursue new zoning rules that require boarding house operators to get a license as neighbors complain the group homes continue to plague West Louisville. [WAVE3]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

When you’re rated worse than Katie King (the girl whose daddy bought her a judgeship), you know you ought to just give up and get a job at Walmart. McLaughlin, a Jefferson County district court judge, is the lowest-rated judge in the county by a wide margin, according to a recently released survey by the Louisville Bar Association. [WFPL]

Just before approving a rate increase of 5.5 percent to raise about $9 million, the Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday voted to spend up to $600,000 on bonuses to most of the agency’s 600 employees. [More C-J/AKN]

A proposal to convert Colston Park in Jeffersonville into a housing development is facing opposition from nearby homeowners. [Business First]

If you live in Southern Indiana, you need to comment on this transportation plan. [News & Tribune]

Of Course LMEMS Is Involved In Another Mess

A controversial policy will remain in place at Louisville’s Atherton High School. The policy allows transgender students to use the restrooms and locker rooms of their choice. [WDRB]

Louisville officials face an uphill legal battle trying to force Norfolk Southern Corp. to allow pedestrian traffic on one side of the K and I railroad bridge. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, yet another pedestrian death in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Ford is recalling 100,610 vehicles in North America for various safety defects. [H-L]

Warning: stupid auto-play video alert. Authorities have recovered a young man’s body from the waters rock quarry Tuesday afternoon near South Park Road after a three-day search. [WLKY]

The Alison Grimes embarrassment continues. In a new ad from Democratic Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes, retired coal miner Don Disney looks straight into the camera and asks Mitch McConnell why he voted to raise his Medicare costs by $6,000. The only problem? McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, cast no such vote. [HuffPo]

Several suburban Louisville fire districts will pull back from all but the most serious medical calls starting this week, a decision that top-ranking emergency officials cautioned would put lives at risk. We hear Richmond is 100% to blame for this. [WAVE3]

Life-size human statues and column bases from a long-lost temple dedicated to a supreme god have been discovered in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq. [HuffPo]

Here’s a look at the sad and continued death of your local newspaper. While WDRB’s acquisition of Konz isn’t that big of a deal (we love her and all that but let’s face it, any journalist with guts can do that job at the paper), it’s the perfect illustration of what’s going down in Gannettland. [WFPL]

Today John Yarmuth will meet with representatives from Catholic Charities of Louisville, Federally Employed Women, the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the National Academy Foundation. [Press Release]

Randall (Randy) Combs has been named CFO of Louisville-based KentuckyOne Health Inc. KentuckyOne operates Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Saint Joseph Hospital in Lexington and several other facilities across the state. [Business First]

A $25 million private investment on property that is one of the first sights of Jeffersonville now may be lost through a city council vote. [News & Tribune]

Karen Sypher Is Poking Her Head Up Again

Louisville Male High School Principal David Mike and two other school staffers could face disciplinary actions at the hands of the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board following the results of an investigation into allegations of cheating on a standardized test. [WDRB]

A Wayside Christian Mission emergency shelter has begun an $11.8 million renovation that will provide space for more beds, a multipurpose building and a new kitchen. [C-J/AKN]

A local organization is hoping safe drinking water will soon be a reality in parts of Tanzania. It’d be awesome to see this sort of effort in our, you know, own backyard in rural Kentucky. Not with water but developing life. [WHAS11]

Long story short: The Democrats are shitting their pants this year. [Sam Youngman]

How you gonna sell fake zoo passes in the parking lot of the flipping zoo?! [WLKY]

With Toni Konz bailing on the Courier-Journal and her sweet USA Today spot to go to WDRB, there must be more trouble afoot. They’ve been trying to recruit her for more than six months. [Press Release]

PEE ALERT! U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn in Louisville, Kentucky, alerted the warden at SCI Benner Township in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, that 37-year-old Jonathan Lee Riches may have used two false names to file an appeal on behalf of 54-year-old Karen Sypher without her consent. [WAVE3]

The HSUS can’t stem the trend toward no-kill, so it’s help shelters mollify critics. [Nathan Winograd]

A greater percentage of foreign-born Kentucky residents hold a college degree than Kentuckians born in the U.S.—but immigrants to Kentucky are also likelier to have not finished high school, according to a study by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [WFPL]

First ladies typically avoid getting into public scraps, but Michelle Obama has jumped into perhaps her biggest battle yet. She’s fighting a House Republican effort to soften a central part of her prized anti-childhood obesity campaign and she says she’s ready “to fight until the bitter end.” [HuffPo]

Dr. Cindy Stowe, the new dean of Sullivan University’s College of Pharmacy, got started in the job last week. [Business First]

While Election Day is still four months away, some races in Floyd County have already been decided. [News & Tribune]