Fischer’s Cool With Giving Cordish Millions Again

Of course Greg Fischer is cool with giving away millions of tax dollars for nothing. Ultimately, Cordish never built anything. But the company is still set to receive $5.25 million from Louisville Metro government simply for walking away from the project. [WDRB]

In his first local media interview, Yum! Brands CEO Greg Creed said the planet’s largest restaurant company will remain headquartered in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting, another victim identified. [WHAS11]

Following complaints that University of Louisville trustees were denied information about problems at the school, some of them are calling for changing the focus of board meetings from “ritual and ceremony” to the “business of the university.” [H-L]

Wait, wait! Here’s another murder. This time in the Portland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Some 9 million Americans could attend community college tuition-free under a proposal President Barack Obama announced Friday. [HuffPo]

A suspect in a Louisville homicide case committed suicide after a standoff with Clarksville Police Saturday. [WAVE3]

Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo Friday filed legislation authorizing the commonwealth to bond $3.3 billion in order to shore up the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement Fund. Which means way more debt to make up for existing debt. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro employees received about $24 million in overtime payments during calendar year 2014, according to data provided by the city. [WFPL]

John David Dyche is kind of right for a change. This one’s all about Steve Beshear kicking a rusty can down the road while patting himself on the back. [BGDN]

The president of Central Bank of Jefferson County is leaving after almost 10 years to relocate to North Carolina. [Business First]

A major step toward asking taxpayers to voluntarily pay more on property taxes — in exchange for major updates to three schools — is scheduled for Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Hot Mess Called Cordish Is Just Making Excuses

Yes, kids, your tax dollars paid someone to say your tax dollars are hurting your tax dollars. KFC! Yum Center has actually “added competition and hurt” another taxpayer-subsidized entertainment venue in downtown Louisville: 4th Street Live. That’s according to a long-time Louisville real estate appraiser hired by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore-based developers that own and operate 4th Street Live. [WDRB]

Four crosswalks along Fourth Street are going to become works of art. The crosswalks at the intersections of Fourth at Broadway, York, Breckinridge and Kentucky streets will be painted as part of the SoBro ArtWalks Contest, which is seeking crosswalk designs. [C-J/AKN]

A plea deal has been reached for the former Louisville Metro Housing director and her mother. [WHAS11]

In 1964, former Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and a group of investors paid $2 million to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Col. Harland Sanders for his legendary chicken business and his secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. [H-L]

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville announced Tuesday a $1 million gift from Sam Swope, founder of Sam Swope Auto Group. [WLKY]

The Gannett Company said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its print operations, including USA Today, becoming the latest media company to break itself up. [NY Times]

As heroin deaths continue to rise throughout the Commonwealth, interest in an overdose antidote known as Naloxone or Narcan is being considered among law enforcement officials. [WAVE3]

Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Greg Fischer has no idea what Louisvillians want or need. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s statewide rail plan is ready for review at the Transportation Cabinet. [Click the Clicky]

Owners of vacant and blighted properties in Lexington may soon face higher taxes. [Business First]

The Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency wants to hear from you. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Still Playing Games With LMAS Scandal

A Jefferson County jury deliberated for about an hour Thursday before finding in favor of The Courier-Journal and its parent company in an age discrimination lawsuit brought by a newspaper executive who was fired in 2011. [WDRB]

Thought Cordish was gonna do all that? The city is moving to find a new life for the long-dormant, historic Louisville Gardens, a century-old, former armory and event venue where Elvis Presley performed and Martin Luther King Jr. spoke. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD released in a statement Wednesday afternoon 22-year-old Danielle Cogswell may have died from a, “suspected overdose.” [WHAS11]

Churchill Downs bought a stake in Saratoga Harness and the deal could lead to financial interest in several more casinos. [H-L]

Sentencing is set for September for a JCPS resource teacher found guilty of murdering her husband. [WLKY]

The cheerleader death story has apparently gone national. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members said they will pursue new zoning rules that require boarding house operators to get a license as neighbors complain the group homes continue to plague West Louisville. [WAVE3]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

When you’re rated worse than Katie King (the girl whose daddy bought her a judgeship), you know you ought to just give up and get a job at Walmart. McLaughlin, a Jefferson County district court judge, is the lowest-rated judge in the county by a wide margin, according to a recently released survey by the Louisville Bar Association. [WFPL]

Just before approving a rate increase of 5.5 percent to raise about $9 million, the Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday voted to spend up to $600,000 on bonuses to most of the agency’s 600 employees. [More C-J/AKN]

A proposal to convert Colston Park in Jeffersonville into a housing development is facing opposition from nearby homeowners. [Business First]

If you live in Southern Indiana, you need to comment on this transportation plan. [News & Tribune]

WDRB Spreading Race-Baiting Hype. Again.

A Northern Kentucky city sued the Kentucky Retirement Systems Monday over what it described as “illegal and imprudent investments” involving hundreds of millions of dollars in public pension money. In its lawsuit, filed in Kenton Circuit Court, the city of Fort Wright said KRS violates the law with risky investments in hedge funds, venture capital funds, private equity funds, leveraged buyout funds and other “alternative investments” that have produced small returns and excessive management fees, possibly in excess of $50 million over the last five years. [John Cheves]

John David Dyche loves race-baiting. And ignorant — because that’s what he is, purposefully ignorant — keeping schools racially integrated improving education. He apparently hasn’t read any of the big stories from the past several weeks on race, education and the south. At least he cares enough to try to talk about some of these things and that’s more than we can say for 99% of people. [WDRB]

The Louisville area is the 17th-deadliest metropolitan area for pedestrians, according to a new study from the National Complete Streets Coalition, a Washington D.C.-based organization that examined fatal wreck data in the country’s 51 largest metro areas. [C-J/AKN]

This is apparently the most important thing happening in Louisville. Have you heard about the social media phenomenon called hidden cash? [WHAS11]

Over the years, under both Republican and Democratic administrations, we’ve made progress in protecting our air and water from harmful mercury, arsenic, soot and other types of pollutants. Every time we’ve done it, people have claimed the economic costs weren’t worth the health and environmental benefits. They’ve been wrong every time because the higher standards sparked innovations in new technologies and ways of doing business that increased growth and created jobs. [Bill Clinton]

Five men have filed a lawsuit against the operators of Fourth Street Live, alleging they were denied entry because of their race. This Cordish nonsense needs to end. [WLKY]

Locals can definitely relate to this. Viewers aren’t the only ones disappointed with local news these days. [HuffPo]

Kentucky business groups said Monday that a federal proposal to reduce carbon emissions at power plants would lead to higher utility bills and scare companies from the state. But that’s only one slanted part of the story. [WAVE3]

Will these Louisville and Lexington leaders also bring back tips for corrupt administrations? Because Charlotte’s mayor is in a heap of legal trouble. [Business First]

Or maybe they’ll learn how to write and push bills to charge police officers and fire fighters for disclosing fracking checmicals. [Mother Jones]

Local arts organizations that receive funding through the Kentucky Arts Partnership grants could see significant cuts in support for the next fiscal year. [WFPL]

The University of Kentucky has received a $1.9 million grant to graduate more students in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. [H-L]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Jeffersonville attorney Brad Jacobs has entered the race for Clark County Circuit County No. 2 judge. [News & Tribune]

Cordish Nightmare Continues With More Discrimination, No Consequences From Metro Government, No Leadership, No Nothing

Five black men have filed a lawsuit against the Cordish Company, which owns and operates 4th Street Live, claiming they were denied entrance to the premises because of their race. This is the millionth incidence of racial profiling at 4th St but the city continues to give hundreds of millions of dollars to Cordish. That shows what people like Jerry Abramson and Greg Fischer really think about Louisvillians. [WDRB]

Jeffersonville police say they’ve been “stretched thin” trying to provide around-the-clock coverage in the 34-square-mile city since thousands of walkers, runners and cyclists have crossed the Big Four ramp into downtown since it opened. [C-J/AKN

Horrible Jeffersonville mayor Mike Moore says he wants to hire more police officers. [WHAS11]

Heroin was once the scourge of the urban poor, but today the typical user is a young, white suburbanite, a study finds. And the path to addiction usually starts with prescription painkillers. [NPR]

The city of Jeffersonville is getting a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to help clean up some old industrial sites. [WLKY]

Most people could be more bored to tears about the latest EPA regulation announcement. Because they’re comfortable paying a few extra bucks a month in order to not die. [CN|2]

A family came together on Saturday to remember a loved one 10 years after her murder. Angela Nelson-Carroll’s body was found off the Gene Snyder Freeway near Dixie Highway in 2004. The 17-year-old died of blunt force trauma to the head. [WAVE3]

Just in case you missed the latest on Democratic sex scandals in Frankfort? You’ll want to check our latest videos out. [Page One Here & Here]

Jefferson County Public Schools’ budget is its largest ever, and some school board members argue that the process for reaching future spending plans must be improved. [WFPL]

Pay for fast-food workers is a hot topic nowadays, particularly in the battle over the minimum wage limit. Here’s John Schnatter defending Papa John’s pay practices. [Business First]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

A $400,000 federal grant from the Environmental Protection Agency will allow Jeffersonville to make some of its otherwise unusable properties attractive to developers and businesses. [News & Tribune]

Woah! A Cordish Racism Mess In Kansas City

You know how Cordish has been mired in all kinds of racism-related scandals here in Louisville?

Get a load of what’s going on in Kansas City with the Power & Light District development operated by Cordish.

From the Kansas City Star:

The owner of the Kansas City Power & Light District is fighting back against a lawsuit that alleged a pattern of discrimination in the entertainment area with one of its own.

Countersuits are common. What’s unusual in this case is that Cordish Cos. and two related entities filed a defamation suit this week against the attorneys who filed the earlier lawsuit on behalf of a former district employee.

-SNIP-

The most damaging of those, Cordish officials say, are allegations that Cordish employed white people as “rabbits” to provoke altercations with black people as an excuse to eject minorities from district clubs in 2012 and 2013.

Cordish denies it did any such thing.

But on Thursday, Cusimano’s lead attorney, Linda Dickens, reaffirmed the allegations of discrimination, produced one of those “rabbits” for members of the news media to interview and called Cordish’s countersuit “a bullying tactic” meant to distract attention from her client’s claims.

“If they had real evidence to defend the lawsuit with,” she said, “they wouldn’t be wasting their time with this.”

-SNIP-

Jean Maneke, a Kansas City lawyer who specializes in free speech law, said she could not think of another example where a lawyer has been sued for repeating allegations made in a lawsuit.

“There is case law that says the material contained in pleadings contained in a case file is absolutely privileged,” she said.

In its lawsuit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Kansas City, Kan., Baltimore-based Cordish accuses Cusimano, Dickens and another attorney in her firm, Austin Johnston, of concocting the rabbit story as a way “to extort money” from the company.

-SNIP-

In his lawsuit, Cusimano alleges that he was the victim of the very tactic that he, an African American, had been ordered to use to reduce the number of black people in the entertainment district.

The man in handcuffs, he said, was probably a “rabbit” who’d picked a fight on the orders of district officials who wanted to get rid of him after he’d raised concerns about discriminatory practices.

In a letter to Cordish dated Dec. 10, 2013, and attached to the Cordish lawsuit, Dickens alleged that Mosaic used rabbits throughout Cusimano’s time there, starting in the summer of 2011.

“In the summer of 2013 alone,” Dickens wrote, “Glen used a rabbit, or saw one being used, approximately 20 to 30 times.”

-SNIP-

In a signed affidavit, Alexitch said that in exchange for starting fights that led to ejections, he was given free drinks and cash, ranging from $50 to $150 a night.

At a Kansas City coffee shop Thursday afternoon, Alexitch told The Star that one way he started trouble was to walk up to groups of black men and insult or flirt with their dates.

It’s a scandalous mess! So be sure to read it all.

And then ask yourself why your city continues to give that company hundreds of millions of dollars with no questions asked.

Study Isn’t Necessary: LMPD Needs More Help

It has hosted college and professional basketball games, high school graduations and roller derby clashes. Louis Armstrong played there, as did musicians from Elvis Presley to My Morning Jacket. [WDRB]

The Waterfront Development Corp. is scrambling to offset the legislature’s abrupt slashing of all state funding for the agency — $420,000 a year for each of the next two fiscal years. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another silly study in Louisville. A study will be conducted over the next several months to see if LMPD is a fully staffed police force. [WHAS11]

A Louisville voter filed a lawsuit Monday, claiming that this year’s Republican challenger against longtime state Democratic Rep. Tom Burch is not a qualified candidate because he doesn’t live in the district. [H-L]

Metro police are asking for help after a pedestrian was seriously injured by a hit-and-run driver in west Louisville. [WLKY]

Of course Kentucky’s in the national news again for something terrible. A prison doctor has been fired and two other staffers are in the midst of being dismissed after an inmate at the Kentucky State Penitentiary starved himself to death, a case that has exposed lapses in medical treatment and in how hunger strikes are handled at the facility. [HuffPo]

A federal judge says attorneys defending Indiana’s gay marriage ban haven’t shown any good reason to not recognize the marriage of a lesbian couple, one of whom has a terminal illness. [WAVE3]

Ronnie Ellis once again says what anyone paying attention has been thinking: education is not an actual priority in Frankfort. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling. [WFPL]

If you missed it last week, go take a look at Reggie Meeks’ remarks on harassment and corruption in Frankfort. [Page One]

Restaurant giant Yum! Brands Inc. will release its first-quarter earnings Tuesday, and the general consensus is that the company will see improved revenue this year compared to the first quarter of 2013. [Business First]

The number of former and current Clark County Drug Treatment Court participants involved in a class action lawsuit claiming mistreatment by Clark County employees recently doubled. [News & Tribune]