Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

History Ignored In Compassionate Land

Two years ago the University of Louisville, Metro Council, Mayor’s Office and the Downtown Development Corporation unveiled some historic markers downtown.

The markers, designed by renowned sculptor Ed Hamilton, were to be placed at sites denoting locations of sit-ins on 4th Street.

Here’s a look back at the event:


CLICK FOR ORIGINAL EVENT INVITATION

Here we are in 2015.

Discarded to make way for what is presumed to be an Embassy Suites parking lot:


FROM FACEBOOK

We reached out to Greg Fischer’s folks last night to find out what’s going on. You know we’re not going to sugar-coat anything, so here’s the deal: they lied, had no idea what was going on, claimed they’d received no communication on the matter.

But here’s the deal. This issue has been quietly bubbling up over the past few days and several elected officials have received emails and telephone calls about the destruction of history. People like David Tandy, Tom Owen, other council members and Greg Fischer.

Here’s a taste of the messages they’re receiving:

I am deeply disturbed that the marker commemorating the civil rights era sit-ins on Fourth Street sits with some trash leaning against a building. These markers were initiated by the late Dr. J Blaine Hudson and designed by Ed Hamilton. Reportedly this is to make way for a parking lot for the Embassy Suites hotel. For a long time now there have been complaints of routine racial profiling and discrimination against African Americans on Fourth Street Live. This development adds insult to injury and is unacceptable. This is shameful and I would like to know how you will address this outrage.

Claiming there’s nothing to see here, move along, just business as usual? Seems fitting. Particularly in light of the non-stop discrimination and racial profiling going on at 4th Street Live.

Maybe someone will finally stand up to the Fischer steamroller and force his team to think before acting. Maybe someone like Christy Brown will finally chastise Fischer publicly instead of behind closed doors. Maybe David Tandy, who is in part responsible for the Cordish mess, will have the sense to say something profound?

Possibility City. Compassionate City. Buzzwords.

Pretty sad. It’ll be whitewashed in 3, 2…

How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Bread & Circuses Can Only Get Crazier

It’s almost as if the new school board doesn’t know how to use their googler. They’re proposing moving school board meetings around to various school sites. Unfortunately, that idea from David Jones, has been a disaster for other districts — like Montgomery County. While it gives a tiny number of people a chance to come to a meeting and gives board members a chance to see inside schools, it ultimately creates confusion and makes it tough for transportation-challenged individuals to plan to attend meetings. What Jones isn’t telling anyone and the reporter is ignoring: This is yet another failed Terry Holliday idea. [WDRB]

Metro Council members questioned the city paying millions to Cordish Co. as part of the downtown Omni tower that will include a hotel and apartments even though the company is no longer involved in the project. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. But there’s nothing to see here, move along. Just ignore it. Pay attention to Greg Fischer’s bread and circuses and everything will be all right. [WHAS11]

A judge in Kentucky has granted a divorce to a same-sex couple despite the fact the state doesn’t recognize gay marriage. [H-L]

Kentucky State Police renew their plea to the public for information that will lead to Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis’ killer. [WLKY]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up another broad challenge to President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law. [HuffPo]

Prospect police are searching for a man who pointed a gun at a woman as she left a daycare Tuesday morning, according to Chief Jeff Sherrard. [WAVE3]

At 8:16 a.m. on the morning of January 9, 2014, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection received the first of what would quickly become an avalanche of complaints. [The Atlantic]

Louisville’s new fleet of electric buses are lighter, quieter and cleaner than the old, carbon monoxide-emitting trolleys residents have grown accustomed to seeing (and perhaps riding) downtown. [WFPL]

The researchers also say they detected crude MCHM in the Ohio River at Louisville, Kentucky, meaning the chemical traveled at least 390 miles downriver from the spill. [Think Progress]

One of the Midwest’s largest law firms has named a new leader at its Louisville office. Geoff White has been named member-in-charge of Frost Brown Todd LLC in Louisville, assuming the role from John R. McCall, who held the position for just more than two years. [Business First]

The lawsuit that put a halt to the Gateway Development Project at 10th and Spring streets in Jeffersonville last year has been settled in principle, and a new request for proposals for the project has been issued by the city’s redevelopment commission. [News & Tribune]

Fischer’s Cool With Giving Cordish Millions Again

Of course Greg Fischer is cool with giving away millions of tax dollars for nothing. Ultimately, Cordish never built anything. But the company is still set to receive $5.25 million from Louisville Metro government simply for walking away from the project. [WDRB]

In his first local media interview, Yum! Brands CEO Greg Creed said the planet’s largest restaurant company will remain headquartered in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting, another victim identified. [WHAS11]

Following complaints that University of Louisville trustees were denied information about problems at the school, some of them are calling for changing the focus of board meetings from “ritual and ceremony” to the “business of the university.” [H-L]

Wait, wait! Here’s another murder. This time in the Portland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Some 9 million Americans could attend community college tuition-free under a proposal President Barack Obama announced Friday. [HuffPo]

A suspect in a Louisville homicide case committed suicide after a standoff with Clarksville Police Saturday. [WAVE3]

Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo Friday filed legislation authorizing the commonwealth to bond $3.3 billion in order to shore up the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement Fund. Which means way more debt to make up for existing debt. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro employees received about $24 million in overtime payments during calendar year 2014, according to data provided by the city. [WFPL]

John David Dyche is kind of right for a change. This one’s all about Steve Beshear kicking a rusty can down the road while patting himself on the back. [BGDN]

The president of Central Bank of Jefferson County is leaving after almost 10 years to relocate to North Carolina. [Business First]

A major step toward asking taxpayers to voluntarily pay more on property taxes — in exchange for major updates to three schools — is scheduled for Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Hot Mess Called Cordish Is Just Making Excuses

Yes, kids, your tax dollars paid someone to say your tax dollars are hurting your tax dollars. KFC! Yum Center has actually “added competition and hurt” another taxpayer-subsidized entertainment venue in downtown Louisville: 4th Street Live. That’s according to a long-time Louisville real estate appraiser hired by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore-based developers that own and operate 4th Street Live. [WDRB]

Four crosswalks along Fourth Street are going to become works of art. The crosswalks at the intersections of Fourth at Broadway, York, Breckinridge and Kentucky streets will be painted as part of the SoBro ArtWalks Contest, which is seeking crosswalk designs. [C-J/AKN]

A plea deal has been reached for the former Louisville Metro Housing director and her mother. [WHAS11]

In 1964, former Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and a group of investors paid $2 million to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Col. Harland Sanders for his legendary chicken business and his secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. [H-L]

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville announced Tuesday a $1 million gift from Sam Swope, founder of Sam Swope Auto Group. [WLKY]

The Gannett Company said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its print operations, including USA Today, becoming the latest media company to break itself up. [NY Times]

As heroin deaths continue to rise throughout the Commonwealth, interest in an overdose antidote known as Naloxone or Narcan is being considered among law enforcement officials. [WAVE3]

Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Greg Fischer has no idea what Louisvillians want or need. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s statewide rail plan is ready for review at the Transportation Cabinet. [Click the Clicky]

Owners of vacant and blighted properties in Lexington may soon face higher taxes. [Business First]

The Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency wants to hear from you. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Still Playing Games With LMAS Scandal

A Jefferson County jury deliberated for about an hour Thursday before finding in favor of The Courier-Journal and its parent company in an age discrimination lawsuit brought by a newspaper executive who was fired in 2011. [WDRB]

Thought Cordish was gonna do all that? The city is moving to find a new life for the long-dormant, historic Louisville Gardens, a century-old, former armory and event venue where Elvis Presley performed and Martin Luther King Jr. spoke. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD released in a statement Wednesday afternoon 22-year-old Danielle Cogswell may have died from a, “suspected overdose.” [WHAS11]

Churchill Downs bought a stake in Saratoga Harness and the deal could lead to financial interest in several more casinos. [H-L]

Sentencing is set for September for a JCPS resource teacher found guilty of murdering her husband. [WLKY]

The cheerleader death story has apparently gone national. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members said they will pursue new zoning rules that require boarding house operators to get a license as neighbors complain the group homes continue to plague West Louisville. [WAVE3]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

When you’re rated worse than Katie King (the girl whose daddy bought her a judgeship), you know you ought to just give up and get a job at Walmart. McLaughlin, a Jefferson County district court judge, is the lowest-rated judge in the county by a wide margin, according to a recently released survey by the Louisville Bar Association. [WFPL]

Just before approving a rate increase of 5.5 percent to raise about $9 million, the Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday voted to spend up to $600,000 on bonuses to most of the agency’s 600 employees. [More C-J/AKN]

A proposal to convert Colston Park in Jeffersonville into a housing development is facing opposition from nearby homeowners. [Business First]

If you live in Southern Indiana, you need to comment on this transportation plan. [News & Tribune]