Maybe Greg Will Give Cordish More $

Guess this is a nice break from all the shootings? LMPD is investigating after at least one person was stabbed near Fourth Street Live! in downtown Louisville. [WDRB]

Philadelphia representatives with the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network visited Louisville on Wednesday as part of an investigation into claims of racial discrimination at the Cordish Co.’s downtown 4th Street Live venue. The group is conducting the fact-finding mission because Cordish is planning to build a casino in Philadelphia, and it is concerned about the project after reading The Courier-Journal’s July 17 story outlining allegations from more than half a dozen former employees who claim that the company uses practices to bar African Americans. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you ever thought Time Warner Cable wasn’t the worst. [WHAS11]

Police in Florida have arrested a Louisville priest who resigned after FBI investigators found child pornography on his computer. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after a man was fatally shot Saturday night outside of an apartment complex in southwestern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Americans use prescription drugs and they know these medicines help people, but they still don’t care much for pharmaceutical companies and think the industry is too money-hungry, according to a new survey. [HuffPo]

Everything is puppies and rainbows. “What we’re trying to do is break a world record with a Guinness World Record for the most paddlers in a lot. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky GOP’s central committee voted Saturday to adopt a presidential caucus system next year, clearing the way Republican Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and reelection at the same time. [Politico]

The grass is nearly knee-high and litter-covered on the vacant lots at the northeast corner of Wilson Avenue and Dixie Highway. The two shaggy lots aren’t unusual for the Park Hill neighborhood, where nearly 8 percent of properties — more than 340 parcels — are vacant or abandoned, according to a 2014 report from Network Center for Community Change. [WFPL]

The US government is launching a $5m (£3.2m) initiative to combat the use and trafficking of heroin, with a focus on prioritising treatment rather than punishment. [BBC]

Glenmary Country Club, a semiprivate club and golf course located off Bardstown Road south of the Gene Snyder Freeway, closed Wednesday and could remain closed indefinitely as a legal dispute surrounding the property continues. [Business First]

During their first official introduction to the proposal, New Albany City Council members were generally receptive to a request to aid in funding a plan designed to eliminate homelessness in Southern Indiana over the next decade. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

PEE ALERT: Fischer Hired Private A P.I.

The Cordish Companies, the company that manages 4th Street Live!, is under fire after the release of a new report that outlines widespread allegations of discrimination. [WDRB]

Now Greg Fischer has hired a private investigator? HAHAHA. His scandals just won’t go away. The man can’t hire anyone who isn’t dirtier than Jerry Abramson’s housing director. [C-J/AKN]

Citing his innovative approach, vision and leadership in managing and maintaining park facilities and programming, Mayor Greg Fischer today named Seve Ghose as the new director of Metro Parks and Recreation. Prediction on how long it takes for this guy’s scandal to surface? [WHAS11]

The only reason not allow the demonstration is because they know it harms their case when people see it’s just slot machines by a different name. Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate denied a motion by The Family Foundation to require racetracks to provide an in-court demonstration of historical wagering, or instant racing. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The number of heroin cases flooding Louisville’s courts has surged from 190 in 2011 to more than 1,500 in 2014. [WLKY]

One of the nation’s most recognizable names in climate science, Dr. James Hansen, released a new paper this week warning that even 2 degrees Celsius of global warming may be “highly dangerous” for humanity. [HuffPo]

A university board with no black members is unacceptable, say two African American leaders. They are asking Kentucky’s Attorney General to get involved on the makeup of University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [WAVE3]

President Obama is enjoying a winning streak lately, with the Supreme Court reaffirming his signature health care law and Iran agreeing to curbs on its nuclear program. But one longstanding goal continues to bedevil him: closing the wartime prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. [NY Times]

Members of the Justice Resource Center and the West Louisville Minister’s Coalition want Attorney General Jack Conway to weigh in on whether Gov. Steve Beshear broke state law when he did not appoint a single African-American to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees. The groups sent a letter to Conway Tuesday. [WFPL]

Hillary Clinton trails three top Republican presidential candidates in matchups in three key swing states — Iowa, Colorado and Virginia — a new Quinnipiac poll finds. [The Hill]

In February, Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. announced plans to purchase Buffalo, N.Y.-based WillCare HealthCare. It looks like that transaction will be closing soon. [Business First]

After a failed referendum in May, a consultant may give the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp. the advantage next time around. [News & Tribune]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

History Ignored In Compassionate Land

Two years ago the University of Louisville, Metro Council, Mayor’s Office and the Downtown Development Corporation unveiled some historic markers downtown.

The markers, designed by renowned sculptor Ed Hamilton, were to be placed at sites denoting locations of sit-ins on 4th Street.

Here’s a look back at the event:


Here we are in 2015.

Discarded to make way for what is presumed to be an Embassy Suites parking lot:


We reached out to Greg Fischer’s folks last night to find out what’s going on. You know we’re not going to sugar-coat anything, so here’s the deal: they lied, had no idea what was going on, claimed they’d received no communication on the matter.

But here’s the deal. This issue has been quietly bubbling up over the past few days and several elected officials have received emails and telephone calls about the destruction of history. People like David Tandy, Tom Owen, other council members and Greg Fischer.

Here’s a taste of the messages they’re receiving:

I am deeply disturbed that the marker commemorating the civil rights era sit-ins on Fourth Street sits with some trash leaning against a building. These markers were initiated by the late Dr. J Blaine Hudson and designed by Ed Hamilton. Reportedly this is to make way for a parking lot for the Embassy Suites hotel. For a long time now there have been complaints of routine racial profiling and discrimination against African Americans on Fourth Street Live. This development adds insult to injury and is unacceptable. This is shameful and I would like to know how you will address this outrage.

Claiming there’s nothing to see here, move along, just business as usual? Seems fitting. Particularly in light of the non-stop discrimination and racial profiling going on at 4th Street Live.

Maybe someone will finally stand up to the Fischer steamroller and force his team to think before acting. Maybe someone like Christy Brown will finally chastise Fischer publicly instead of behind closed doors. Maybe David Tandy, who is in part responsible for the Cordish mess, will have the sense to say something profound?

Possibility City. Compassionate City. Buzzwords.

Pretty sad. It’ll be whitewashed in 3, 2…

How Many Will Be Shot Dead This Week?

LMPD responded to the scene of a shooting at 26th and Chestnut Streets in the Russell neighborhood. Police Chief Steve Conrad says a male in his 20s was shot by an LMPD officer during a narcotics investigation. [WDRB]

A half-dozen faculty members speaking before the University of Louisville Faculty Senate on Wednesday denounced large deferred compensation packages that have been given to the university’s top executives. Several speakers said that while the packages for President James Ramsey, Provost Shirley Willihnganz and Chief of Staff Kathleen Smith might be legal, they are not ethical, given tuition hikes and low pay for faculty. [C-J/AKN]

Protesters were out in force in Louisville Saturday night, echoing a common cry across the country: Black lives matter. [WHAS11]

About 45 minutes before Comer’s remarks began, the latest Bluegrass Poll was released showing the state commissioner of agriculture trailing former Louisville councilman Hal Heiner by 8 points and tied with Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, who lost a primary challenge to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell last spring. Hours before that, Comer’s campaign faced a minor embarrassment when the PageOneKentucky blog revealed that the parents and brother of Holly Harris Von Luehrte, Comer’s former campaign manager, were hosting a fundraiser for Heiner. [H-L]

Two people were killed Saturday afternoon when the car they were riding in was struck by a train in the West Buechel area. [WLKY]

The share of unemployed Americans who receive unemployment insurance benefits has dwindled to its lowest point in decades, thanks in part to benefit cuts in Republican-led states. Just 23.1 percent of unemployed workers received state unemployment benefits at the end of 2014. [HuffPo]

“I heard the shot,” Pamela Vethel recalled. She saw when police pulled up at an apartment building on the corner of 26th Street and Chestnut. She didn’t expect what would happen next, just as two officers entered the stairwell. [WAVE3]

Johnathan Masters admits he’s not exactly the ideal running mate – he’s got a string of charges on his record, and pending court appearances on the calendar — but he is absolutely puzzled by his latest arrest in Kenton County, Kentucky. Apparently, he was told by police on Wednesday he failed to return a library book from 11 years ago. [Umm]

PharMerica Corp., the nation’s second-largest operator of institutional pharmacies, has agreed to settle two federal healthcare fraud lawsuits, one of which accuses the Louisville-based company of taking kickbacks to help expand the misuse of an anti-seizure drug in nursing homes during an 11-year period. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell says there’ll be no vote to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general until Republicans and Democrats resolve a dispute over a human trafficking bill. [Politico]

Wait for it, wait for it… Claudia Coffey, executive director of the Louisville Apartment Association, said the city’s rental boom is infused by job growth. Couldn’t possibly have anything to do with no one being able to afford to buy. [Business First]

J.P. can see the end of the road to his journey out of homelessness. The 42-year-old Jeffersonville resident lives in a shipping container near some railroad tracks. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Bread & Circuses Can Only Get Crazier

It’s almost as if the new school board doesn’t know how to use their googler. They’re proposing moving school board meetings around to various school sites. Unfortunately, that idea from David Jones, has been a disaster for other districts — like Montgomery County. While it gives a tiny number of people a chance to come to a meeting and gives board members a chance to see inside schools, it ultimately creates confusion and makes it tough for transportation-challenged individuals to plan to attend meetings. What Jones isn’t telling anyone and the reporter is ignoring: This is yet another failed Terry Holliday idea. [WDRB]

Metro Council members questioned the city paying millions to Cordish Co. as part of the downtown Omni tower that will include a hotel and apartments even though the company is no longer involved in the project. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. But there’s nothing to see here, move along. Just ignore it. Pay attention to Greg Fischer’s bread and circuses and everything will be all right. [WHAS11]

A judge in Kentucky has granted a divorce to a same-sex couple despite the fact the state doesn’t recognize gay marriage. [H-L]

Kentucky State Police renew their plea to the public for information that will lead to Bardstown Officer Jason Ellis’ killer. [WLKY]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up another broad challenge to President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law. [HuffPo]

Prospect police are searching for a man who pointed a gun at a woman as she left a daycare Tuesday morning, according to Chief Jeff Sherrard. [WAVE3]

At 8:16 a.m. on the morning of January 9, 2014, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection received the first of what would quickly become an avalanche of complaints. [The Atlantic]

Louisville’s new fleet of electric buses are lighter, quieter and cleaner than the old, carbon monoxide-emitting trolleys residents have grown accustomed to seeing (and perhaps riding) downtown. [WFPL]

The researchers also say they detected crude MCHM in the Ohio River at Louisville, Kentucky, meaning the chemical traveled at least 390 miles downriver from the spill. [Think Progress]

One of the Midwest’s largest law firms has named a new leader at its Louisville office. Geoff White has been named member-in-charge of Frost Brown Todd LLC in Louisville, assuming the role from John R. McCall, who held the position for just more than two years. [Business First]

The lawsuit that put a halt to the Gateway Development Project at 10th and Spring streets in Jeffersonville last year has been settled in principle, and a new request for proposals for the project has been issued by the city’s redevelopment commission. [News & Tribune]