Some Schools Treat Kids Like Criminals

This… just…. what? “All Lives Matter”? Every backward white bigot in the city is gonna be pounding their chest on this one because they don’t understand the purpose of the Black Lives Matter movement. A Central High School student is on a mission to promote peace in Louisville and spread the message that ‘All Lives Matter.’ [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is looking for outside help as the search to fill some of its top-level positions drags on. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville police are investigating a homicide in the Hallmark neighborhood that’s just north of Shivley. [WHAS11]

The state has issued a recreational advisory warning people to avoid contact with water in a large swath of the Ohio River because of potentially harmful algae. [H-L]

Staff reorganization of Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville that was set to get underway in October is put on hold. [WLKY]

Remember when this crap was attempted in Louisville? A community in Alabama is on the verge of banning saggy pants — and one lawmaker said it’s because God doesn’t like the look. [HuffPo]

Students who attend New Albany/Floyd County schools will now be drug tested if the school decides there is individualized reasonable suspicion a student is participating in drug or alcohol use. [WAVE3]

Politicians are suddenly eager to disown failed policies on American prisons, but they have failed to reckon with the history. [The Atlantic]

Louisville is on the verge of joining a select few cities boasting a coveted technology service. Google Fiber representatives will spend the next several months exploring the feasibility of installing ultra-fast fiber Internet connectivity in the city. [WFPL]

President Obama on Saturday abandoned his two-year effort to have the government create a system that explicitly rates the quality of the nation’s colleges and universities, a plan that was bitterly opposed by presidents at many of those institutions. [NY Times]

More than 80 percent of construction companies are having a hard time finding qualified workers, according to a survey of 1,386 companies by Associated General Contractors of America. [Business First]

A project that will continue the transformation of the former Value City Furniture property in Clarksville is nearly complete, and it now has a name. [News & Tribune]

Is Fischer’s Omni Train Off The Rails?

If you’re wealthy and aren’t supporting this place, something is wrong with you. It is expected to be a much safer environment for women and children in danger. The Center for Women and Families is in the process of getting an extra layer of protection. [WDRB]

The Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau has set up an advisory council of representatives of some high-profile, out-of-town organizations to suggest what Louisville might do to improve its status as a meeting destination in hope of drawing more lucrative tourism business. [C-J/AKN]

If it’s not a gunshot death or a pedestrian death, it’s possibly a train death. [WHAS11]

The Council on Postsecondary Education is holding a series of public meetings around the state to get input on a new five-year plan to guide Kentucky’s higher education and adult education systems. Don’t worry, this won’t matter. Don’t get too excited about it. [H-L]

A new report shows the number of people who died from drug overdoses in Kentucky jumped 7 percent last year while the number of deaths attributed to heroin stayed about the same. [WLKY]

More states are considering restoring the right to vote to felons, with supporters saying that once their debt to society is paid they should be allowed to exercise a fundamental right. [HuffPo]

The design for the 30 story Omni building planned for downtown Louisville is suddenly uncertain after a regulatory panel delayed its approval for at least two weeks. [WAVE3]

Wondering why poor kids are unhealthy? The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday adopted a GOP amendment that would provide schools flexibility in meeting Department of Agriculture (USDA) rules for serving whole-grain products and reducing sodium levels. [The Hill]

Since 2010, vandals have caused more than $400,000 in damages at Louisville parks and community centers, according to data provided by Metro Parks. [WFPL]

The top electricity providers in the country are going renewable much more slowly than smaller companies, according to data reported Tuesday by sustainability group Ceres. [ThinkProgress]

A few weeks ago, we reported that the U.S. Department of Justice had filed a lawsuit that aims to block AB Electrolux’s acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. The government contends that the deal would lead to less competition, higher prices and fewer options for American buyers. Electrolux, for its part, has a plan to convince regulators otherwise. [Business First]

Another candidate has entered the New Albany race for mayor, but this one wants to break through the limitations of the current political system. [News & Tribune]

Are You Excited For Not Diana To Visit?

Everybody is freaking out about Prince Charles and that lady who is not Diana coming to Louisville. [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday nominated Sujata Barai Chugh, a public policy and nonprofit grant writing consultant, to fill one of two open seats on the Metropolitan Sewer District board. [C-J/AKN]

An underground service explosion caused a disruption to power to some customers in the areas of 4th, Liberty, Fifth and Jefferson streets, according to LG&E spokesperson Natasha Collins. [WHAS11]

Raising the minimum wage is a top issue for Kentucky voters, contrary to the nonsense Greg Fischer has spewed. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville police are investigating human remains found on a construction site in Lake Louisvilla in eastern Jefferson County, on Monday. [WLKY]

When he published Diana: Her True Story in 1992, Andrew Morton faced a “cataclysm” from the British establishment, who wished to “deny the message and denigrate the messenger” behind the explosive biography. [HuffPo]

Now we’re leaving shootings (okay, not really) and are getting back to good old fashioned stabbings. [WAVE3]

Hypocrisy. Disappointment. Frustration. That’s how Democrats described their feelings about Republicans as they listened to President Barack Obama call for a renewal of the Voting Rights Act in front of the Edmund Pettus Bridge on the anniversary of the march that helped get the law passed 50 years ago. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Government will pay $1.5 million to settle a legal suit filed by a group of young men wrongfully arrested in summer 2014. [WFPL]

No new research projects will begin at the U.S. government’s key livestock study center until animal welfare is improved through stronger oversight and better training of standards, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said on Monday. [Reuters]

Nucleus, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, plans to keep its deadline intact for the construction of a six-story parking garage at 220 S. Preston St. in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

The Indiana Senate’s top budget writer said Thursday he wants to consider ways of possibly easing proposed school funding shifts that could lead to cuts for many urban and rural districts with shrinking enrollments. [News & Tribune]

Hargens Doesn’t Have JCPS Under Control

Another day, another dumb JCPS incident. No threat was found after police conducted a sweep at Eastern High School this morning after reports that a student planned to bring a gun to school. [WDRB]

Ford Motor Co.’s billion-dollar gamble on manufacturing its full-size pickup trucks with aluminum alloy is about to bring big changes to Louisville’s Kentucky Truck Plant. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a survey that reaches out to staff, students and every parent within the Jefferson County Public Schools’ district and it will collect feedback on everything from academics to to school safety to job satisfaction. [WHAS11]

Consultants are finishing a report that examines how Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act has impacted Kentucky’s health care system. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police detectives have their ninth homicide case of the year after being called to the Parkland neighborhood early Monday morning. [WLKY]

Have scientists discovered a new species of primitive human? [HuffPo]

When fire tears through a home, it could be easy for firefighters scrambling to control the blaze to overlook pets trapped by the flames, especially if they don’t have the tools to rescue small animals. [WAVE3]

President Obama on Monday sent Congress a nearly $4 trillion budget blueprint for 2016 that would raise taxes on the wealthy and businesses while boosting spending on infrastructure and education. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail had another record-breaking year in attendance. The trail’s nine participating distilleries had 627,032 visitors in 2014, an increase of 10 percent over the previous year. [WFPL]

During the Frack Free Foothills community forum Tuesday, several speakers disagreed with statements submitted to media before the meeting by the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association (KOGA). [Richmond Register]

In the last quarter of 2014, 617 residential building permits were issued in the Louisville area, up 15 percent from the 529 permits issued in the fourth quarter of 2013. [Business First]

If House Bill 1110 becomes law, the Clark County Circuit Court will be authorized to appoint a new magistrate. On Thursday, Circuit Court No. 4 Judge Vicki Carmichael said the new magistrate would likely handle the county’s juvenile docket. [News & Tribune]

Hopefully Not Another Downtown Disappointment

Everyone hopes it comes to fruition but we’re already hearing from doubtful powerbrokers. An Omni hotel set for downtown will climb higher into the city skyline than initially planned, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Tuesday in outlining terms of a deal finalized last month. [WDRB]

That’s right — Greg Fischer loves keeping the worst of the worst on staff. When asked if Steve Rowland would continue to be a key member of his administration following his Friday arrest, Mayor Greg Fischer said “I certainly hope so.” [C-J/AKN]

One of the Louisville Zoo’s beloved polar bears is celebrating a birthday. [WHAS11]

Muhammad Ali is home after being hospitalized with a severe urinary tract infection. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The bitter cold has local homeless shelters gearing up for an influx of visitors. Crews are out this week trying to help who they can as even colder weather moves into the area. [WLKY]

Democrats and Social Security advocates are accusing House Republicans of launching a sneak attack on disability insurance on the very first day of the new Congress. [HuffPo]

After a video captured a raid inside of Louisville business the owner met with the Alcohol Beverage Control Board for a hearing about what they claim happened that night. [WAVE3]

Winter is not typically the busy season for Kuttawa (kuh-TAH-wah), a little vacation town on the north bank of Lake Barkley in far western Kentucky. But after the tragic plane crash on January 2 that left four dead and one miraculous survivor, Kuttawa exploded into high season, with as many reporters in town as vacationers renting pontoon boats on Fourth of July weekend. [Jim Higdon/The Daily Beast]

If you notice your memory isn’t what it used to be, you may be one of thousands of Kentuckians in the early stages of cognitive decline that could lead to Alzheimer’s. [WFPL]

Six Americans die from alcohol poisoning daily on average, and mortality rates are highest among middle-aged men, federal health authorities reported on Tuesday. [NY Times]

West Buechel Mayor Rick Richards announced at a special council meeting Tuesday that State Auditor Adam Edelen will examine the city’s books. [Business First]

Floyd County will end 2014 with a balance of $40,000, but it took some financial wheeling and dealing to get all accounts into the black. [News & Tribune]

Anchorage Mess Is About Rich Folks’ Money

When railroad giant CSX Corp. moves freight between Louisville and Indianapolis, it’s forced to lower speeds, keep trains shorter and carry lighter loads. [WDRB]

Here’s another fun made-up thing for Greg Fischer’s staff to push around all week. [C-J/AKN]

The key to the new downtown hotels is a major expansion of the downtown convention center. It’s a surge in hotel construction never before seen in Louisville, about 1,400 rooms confirmed, not including several hundred more in the planning stages. [WHAS11]

What on earth is going on in Anchorage?! Smells like a bunch of wealthy folks trying to kick some underprivileged kids to the curb. [Click the Clicky]

Peyton Hoge would be popping a vein right about now. [JLC]

Two people have been sentenced for abusing the corpse of a former paramedic. [WLKY]

Oscar winner Hilary Swank is unleashing some serious star power to help rescue dogs get adopted by families who want to make a difference on Thanksgiving — or those who just want to watch terriers instead of touchdowns on TV.[HuffPo]

It’s time for an exciting new Flack Attack! Because we all know a few bad apples = all cyclists are the absolute devil. [WAVE3]

After having the case for more than five months, the special prosecutor assigned to handle a dispute over whether Louisville Metro Councilman David James has two incompatible jobs has asked to withdraw and said she does not believe the situation can be resolved outside of court. [More C-J/AKN]

When the temperature drops as it has this week, local shelters are crowded with homeless men and women. [WFPL]

State government finalized its 20-year statewide transportation plan. [Click the Clicky]

Just when you thought things couldn’t get crazier at the University of Louisville? Jim Ramsey announces the hiring of the vice chancellor and general counsel from the University of North Carolina. The same school that’s recently been found by NCAA investigators to have committed something like two decades of academic fraud involving its athletics program. This individual would have been on the front lines, to say the least. [Business First]

Strohm was one of the key players behind a public records battle with the media as reporters attempted to look into a scandal involving student athletes and allegations of academic misconduct. [ABC11]

Census data shows the population makeup of Jeffersonville changing drastically over the next 20 years, and city officials want to make sure the city itself changes along with it. [News & Tribune]

If Louisville’s PubTrans Is Good, What’s Bad?

For decades, it’s been an oasis of agricultural land at the intersection of Interstate 64 and the Watterson Expressway. But the family trusts that control Oxmoor Farm appear to be reviving long-delayed plans to develop what is perhaps the most desirable acreage in Louisville. [WDRB]

Didn’t we ridicule this back before it kicked off? Over pounding music, the local reality TV show “Deadbeat” promises that “those who don’t pay up will be locked up.” [C-J/AKN]

If you don’t hate the gays, the close cases at the Southern Baptist Compound don’t want to play Barbies with you. [WHAS11]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes declined Wednesday to say whether she will pull a television ad that three left-leaning, pro-immigration reform groups condemned Tuesday as “offensive” and “hurtful.” [Sam Youngman]

This riverboat thing is apparently a big deal. So say all the teevee people. [WLKY]

People are changing Earth so much, warming and polluting it, that many scientists are turning to a new way to describe the time we live in. They’re calling it the Anthropocene — the age of humans. [HuffPo]

Grimes implies that she’s barred from saying who she voted for, and the Constitution includes no prohibition on that. [WAVE3]

Many thousands of Americans who lost their homes in the housing bust, but have since begun to rebuild their finances, are suddenly facing a new foreclosure nightmare: debt collectors are chasing them down for the money they still owe by freezing their bank accounts, garnishing their wages and seizing their assets. [Reuters]

Louisville workers using public transit have “better than average” accessibility to their jobs compared to other large metropolitan areas, according to a researcher involved in a recent study. [WFPL]

Louisville’s disaster of a mayor spends his days lying on the radio. The man will be called on something, his claims will be debunked and then he’ll show up on the radio the next day spewing what he knows is false. [The ‘Ville Voice]

A committee of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has ordered Churchill Downs and Kentucky Downs to hold mediated discussions in their dispute over September racing dates for next year. [Business First]

Basically, everybody in Southern Indiana thinks they’re gonna get the Ebola. Two patients in the United States with confirmed cases of Ebola hemorrhagic fever were both hundreds of miles away from the region, but health officials in Clark and Floyd counties said they’re still taking measures to prepare locally. [News & Tribune]