John Yarmuth Running For Re-Election

Despite the deluded dreams of a handful of Republicans, Congressman John Yarmuth is running for re-election.

So said Yarmuth a moment ago at a press conference on Lower Brownsboro.

That’s fun and… wait for it… not surprising.

UPDATE —

If you want the press release, here it is:

LOUISVILLE, KY – Today, at his campaign headquarters, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) announced that he will seek a 6th term as Louisville’s U.S. Representative in 2016.

“As the lone progressive voice in Kentucky’s federal delegation, I take very seriously my responsibility to fight for our community’s values in Washington. The Republican Leadership has become more extreme, and they have increasingly pursued an agenda that threatens the livelihoods and opportunities of families in Louisville and throughout the nation,” Congressman Yarmuth said. “I believe the work of changing the priorities of the next Congress is critically important, and that’s why I’m running for reelection in 2016.”

Kentucky candidates for federal office are not able to file for 2016 campaigns until November, but Yarmuth didn’t want speculation about his race to distract from the issues in campaigns for statewide offices.

The second ranking Democrat on the Budget Committee, Congressman Yarmuth has advocated for a budget that prioritizes investments in communities, families, and businesses. While most now agree that income inequality is a major problem, the Congressman said the Republican budget would cut funding for job training, education and infrastructure, while trying to take health insurance away from millions of Americans. He has become a vocal and persistent opponent of the gimmicks in the current budget proposal that hide the massive costs of greater tax breaks to the well-off and well connected.

As a member of the Ways and Means Committee in the 111th Congress, Yarmuth was active in the development of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, which has helped more than 500,000 Kentuckians gain health insurance and cut Louisville’s uninsured rate by 81%. He remains a strong national advocate for the law and plans to continue working on improvements to ensure all Americans in need of medical attention get the care they need when they need it.

In the last Congress, Yarmuth served as part of the bipartisan group of 8, helping to craft a compromise comprehensive immigration reform bill that received wide support but was not brought up for a vote. He pledged to continue working for a law that promotes humane enforcement, provides a path to citizenship, and keeps families together.

Long before he was elected to Congress, Yarmuth was a strong advocate for equality for women and minorities, and he reaffirmed that commitment today . “America should be a place where, partners have the freedom to marry, prayer is personal, and no one ever loses their job, home, or life based on how they look, whom they love, or where they were born,” he said.

His platform was decidedly progressive but hardly partisan. Among numerous issues that receive broad, bipartisan support nearly everywhere but within the halls of Congress, Yarmuth singled out gun safety. Initiatives such as background checks and limits on magazine capacity have garnered favor from voters in both parties in poll after poll. But, amidst a plague of shooting deaths and calls for action by Yarmuth and numerous colleagues, Congressional Leadership has failed to act.

He addressed another topic that is taboo on Capitol Hill despite near universal support: campaign finance reform. The lead sponsor of a Constitutional Amendment to overturn Citizens United, Yarmuth stated, “Until we get the big money out of politics, our elections will never be honest, and our government will never be responsive to the priorities of the American people.

“As long as our laws say money equals speech, speech will not be free,” Yarmuth added. “That’s just common sense.”

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]

Transparency Is Not A Thing In Possibility City

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found with a gunshot wound inside the Hampton Inn on Jefferson Street in downtown Louisville just before 11 o’clock Monday night. [WDRB]

Because there’s no such thing as transparency in Louisville! The question of whether the Metropolitan Sewer District was violating the state’s open records rules from its board members’ use of private email accounts won’t be answered by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway. [C-J/AKN]

People are still freaking out about the murder on Ewing Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Fayette County Public Schools have cancelled classes for the rest of the week, according to the district’s website. [H-L]

There was an open conversation between African-American veterans and Congress Wednesday morning in Louisville. [WLKY]

A federal judge’s ruling halting the president’s executive actions on immigration did little to persuade either party in Congress to publicly back down from a budget standoff. [HuffPo]

Electrolux, the Swedish company buying General Electric’s appliance division, will make Louisville’s Appliance Park a key part of future plans, the company’s leader said Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Louisville is the 11th-poorest city in the United States. But it’s still all puppies and rainbows and whatever else Greg Fischer’s spokesgays can come up with on any given day. [CBS News]

Jefferson County Public Schools is asking parents whether an A letter grade should be based on a 90-100 point scale instead of the 93-100 scale currently used. [WFPL]

Scott Welk, who brought forward the lawsuit on Tuesday in California federal court, accused the Jim Beam Brands of violating California’s False Advertising Law with its handmade claims thus forcing him to pay a premium price for Jim Beam’s white label Bourbon. [The Spirit Business]

The elephant in the room: forcing everyone at the dying newspaper to re-apply for their jobs despite saying that wouldn’t happen. And laying Jim Carroll off because Kentucky doesn’t need to know anything about Washington, D.C., obviously. [Business First]

Two challenges have been filed against Clarksville Town Council candidates — Rick Schafer running for District 2 and Dave Disponett running for District 4. [News & Tribune]