Enjoy The Holiday Break Cause 2015 Will Suck

Spoiler Alert: A gymnasium isn’t going to solve the problem. In the last 10 years, Wayne Blakey Sr. has seen a lot of violence near his home on River Park Drive in West Louisville. [WDRB]

Launched in September in four high-crime areas, Zones of Hope is a city initiative trying to tackle issues of education, unemployment and violence by focusing on young black males. [C-J/AKN]

It was a joyous welcome for Santa and his elves at the Wayside Christian Mission on Christmas Eve. With the help of the Louisville community, Santa brought presents for all the Mission’s residents, spending their holiday at the shelter. [WHAS11]

The University of Louisville has been awarded a $155,000 grant to map disease genes in horses. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! For one family, Christmas Eve isn’t just a holiday, but the anniversary of a devastating loss. [WLKY]

This is not the kind of bourbon that will get you excited. Researchers have identified the cause of a Kansas farmer’s mysterious death this summer as Bourbon virus. [HuffPo]

The rally at Jefferson Square in downtown Louisville was organized by the local group Man Up, and came just hours after another person was shot dead by police near St. Louis. Maybe in the future, they could hold a rally without one of the city’s most notorious bigots screaming into the microphone? [WAVE3]

The 2014 midterm elections saw a wave of Republican candidates elected and re-elected to federal office, many of whom are now rearing to make the environment their first casualty of the 114th Congress. As it turns out, the fossil fuel industry may have had something to do with that. [Think Progress]

Steve Beshear is heading into his final regularly scheduled legislative session next month, but he said he doesn’t believe that will hamper his ability to help get legislation passed in the 2015 General Assembly. [WFPL]

Here’s a fun read about Ambassador Matthew Barzun’s musical tastes. Just read between the lines. [BuzzFeed]

Churchill Downs Racetrack has named its latest track announcer. For some reason, a ton of folks wrote in asking for this link. Here you go. [Business First]

Amid public outcry over a new fee being assessed, the Clark County Commissioners declined to vote on an ordinance that would have facilitated the collection of the fee. [News & Tribune]

JCTA Put Its Foot In Its Mouth With That One

Some Jefferson County teachers are upset after their names were included without their knowledge in a political advertisement sent to approximately 50,000 voters by the Jefferson County Teachers Association. [WDRB]

A record 548,815 people are registered to vote in Jefferson County in the general election Tuesday, Nov. 4, newly released figures by the Jefferson County clerk’s office and the county Board of Elections show. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun JCPS bus accident. [WHAS11]

After the 2014 Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs was hit with backlash from some unhappy owners who felt they’d been given less than VIP treatment so the racetrack has a plan to fix that. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A young man gunned down behind a West Louisville home leaves police searching for a suspect, and an outraged community is demanding justice. [WLKY]

Why it matters that PetSmart discriminates against Pit Bulls. [HuffPo]

The three candidates trying to win the Clark County sheriff race say improving low morale and attacking drug crimes are critical issues facing an agency rocked by scandal this summer. [WAVE3]

Attorney General Jack Conway and his Office of Victims Advocacy, along with University of Kentucky professor TK Logan and fellow members of the Statewide Domestic Violence Fatality Review Committee, released the Domestic Violence Special Report: Kentucky 2010 Homicides. [Press Release]

Kynect cannot survive without the Affordable Care Act, according to its director and a Kentucky public health educator. [WFPL]

Bellarmine University economics and finance professors will draw upon lessons of previous recessions to offer advice for consumers and investors about the current economic recovery during a forum on Thursday, November 6, at 5:30 p.m. [Bellarmine]

The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority has granted preliminary approval for tax increment financing toward construction of the 150-room boutique hotel, which has been proposed on a vacant lot at Shelby and Market Streets in the NuLu district of Louisville. [Business First]

The Nawbny paper has a pretty solid 2014 general election voter guide. [News & Tribune]

GREG FISCHER PEE ALERT! Greg Fischer is now trying to spin in order to detract from negative press. He put out a release yesterday in an attempt to appear transparent and featured alleged Animal Services numbers that we already know to be… mythical, to say the least. [Metro Government]

Human Trafficking, Stabbing And Electric Buses

The first person in Louisville convicted of human trafficking was sentenced to 10 years in prison with no probation Monday morning. [WDRB]

In June, 16-year-old Elivar Mazariegos stepped off a bus in the desert town of Altar, Mexico, 1,900 miles north of his rural village in Guatemala, where a death threat had pushed him to join a surge of unaccompanied children fleeing violence and poverty. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun stabbing? The victim of the stabbing in the 500 block of East Ormsby has been identified. [WHAS11]

Louisville officials plan to phase out the oldtime-looking trolleys that are a staple of downtown in favor of all-electric buses. [H-L]

The 125th fall meet is officially underway at Churchill Downs. [WLKY]

A few hours before dawn on Wednesday morning, city counselors in Fort Lauderdale, FL passed a bill to make it harder to feed the homeless. [Think Progress]

Two months after a baby girl was shot to death on her front porch in Louisville’s West End, we’re learning more about why. [WAVE3]

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said on Saturday the U.S. government will recognize same-sex marriages in six more states, bringing to 32 the number of states where couples in gay unions qualify for federal benefits. [Reuters]

Kentuckians enrolling in Kynect, the state’s health care exchange, can expect changes in the way they shop for health insurance beginning Nov. 15. [WFPL]

Listen to voters from either end of the political spectrum and you’ll hear a similar complaint: most are tired of the inability of members of Congress to work together to get something done. [Ronnie Ellis]

Teddy Abrams doesn’t see why the Louisville Orchestra shouldn’t sell out every performance. [Business First]

The newest member of the Sellersburg Town Council hopes to bring some of youth to the team. [News & Tribune]

If Louisville’s PubTrans Is Good, What’s Bad?

For decades, it’s been an oasis of agricultural land at the intersection of Interstate 64 and the Watterson Expressway. But the family trusts that control Oxmoor Farm appear to be reviving long-delayed plans to develop what is perhaps the most desirable acreage in Louisville. [WDRB]

Didn’t we ridicule this back before it kicked off? Over pounding music, the local reality TV show “Deadbeat” promises that “those who don’t pay up will be locked up.” [C-J/AKN]

If you don’t hate the gays, the close cases at the Southern Baptist Compound don’t want to play Barbies with you. [WHAS11]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes declined Wednesday to say whether she will pull a television ad that three left-leaning, pro-immigration reform groups condemned Tuesday as “offensive” and “hurtful.” [Sam Youngman]

This riverboat thing is apparently a big deal. So say all the teevee people. [WLKY]

People are changing Earth so much, warming and polluting it, that many scientists are turning to a new way to describe the time we live in. They’re calling it the Anthropocene — the age of humans. [HuffPo]

Grimes implies that she’s barred from saying who she voted for, and the Constitution includes no prohibition on that. [WAVE3]

Many thousands of Americans who lost their homes in the housing bust, but have since begun to rebuild their finances, are suddenly facing a new foreclosure nightmare: debt collectors are chasing them down for the money they still owe by freezing their bank accounts, garnishing their wages and seizing their assets. [Reuters]

Louisville workers using public transit have “better than average” accessibility to their jobs compared to other large metropolitan areas, according to a researcher involved in a recent study. [WFPL]

Louisville’s disaster of a mayor spends his days lying on the radio. The man will be called on something, his claims will be debunked and then he’ll show up on the radio the next day spewing what he knows is false. [The ‘Ville Voice]

A committee of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has ordered Churchill Downs and Kentucky Downs to hold mediated discussions in their dispute over September racing dates for next year. [Business First]

Basically, everybody in Southern Indiana thinks they’re gonna get the Ebola. Two patients in the United States with confirmed cases of Ebola hemorrhagic fever were both hundreds of miles away from the region, but health officials in Clark and Floyd counties said they’re still taking measures to prepare locally. [News & Tribune]

This Kid Needs Your Help. Consider Stepping Up.

Indiana and Kentucky have selected a Virginia-based company to oversee the toll system for the Ohio River Bridges Project. The contract, estimated at $39.9 million, includes installing, operating and maintaining the toll equipment for seven years, said Kendra York, Indiana’s public finance director. [WDRB]

Churchill Downs Incorporated announced Churchill Downs, its namesake racetrack, and Yum! Brands, Inc., have signed a five-year agreement that extends Yum!’s role as the presenting sponsor of the $2 million-guaranteed Kentucky Derby, one of America’s most legendary sports and entertainment events. [Press Release]

Local police amass millions in military surplus. Jeffersontown Police Officer Tommy McCann popped the trunk of his cruiser to reveal thousands of dollars worth of military-grade equipment. [C-J/AKN]

WTF? Is there a war coming to Clarksville? [More C-J/AKN]

There was a ribbon cutting Monday afternoon for the new visitor center at the Stitzel-Weller distillery in Shively. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association says Stitzel-Weller will be the newest stop on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. [WHAS11]

Police in Pulaski County recently worked two incidents in a week’s time involving alleged drunk drivers on riding lawn mowers, including one arrested after he ​drove to the drive-through window at a fast-food restaurant, according to the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office. [H-L]

The affidavit said after Oberhansley killed Blanton, he removed parts of her skull and brain, heart and part of a lung. The document said Oberhansley told detectives he cooked and ate the organs. [WLKY]

An astounding 72% percent of Americans say they are unhappy with Republicans in Congress. [HuffPo]

It could be the most important thing you do this week. A Louisville high school sophomore desperately needs a bone marrow match to win the fight he’s battled for three years. [WAVE3]

Was it really only a year ago that we were gearing up for the big unveil of Healthcare.gov where the uninsured could seamlessly go online and shop for health care as they would their vacation travel? [WaPo]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District has reached an agreement with the union that represents several of its employees. [WFPL]

Public schools throughout the nation continue to contend with budget shortfalls and insufficient classroom resources, while U.S. test scores remain far behind those of many other developed nations. Here are measures that can be taken to fix America’s troubled education system. [The Onion]

You guessed it — more of the same for the arena shenanigans. [Business First]

Complaints about the termination of a recycling program in Clark County’s unincorporated areas may prompt the county commissioners to bring it back — if the price is right. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Still Playing Games With LMAS Scandal

A Jefferson County jury deliberated for about an hour Thursday before finding in favor of The Courier-Journal and its parent company in an age discrimination lawsuit brought by a newspaper executive who was fired in 2011. [WDRB]

Thought Cordish was gonna do all that? The city is moving to find a new life for the long-dormant, historic Louisville Gardens, a century-old, former armory and event venue where Elvis Presley performed and Martin Luther King Jr. spoke. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD released in a statement Wednesday afternoon 22-year-old Danielle Cogswell may have died from a, “suspected overdose.” [WHAS11]

Churchill Downs bought a stake in Saratoga Harness and the deal could lead to financial interest in several more casinos. [H-L]

Sentencing is set for September for a JCPS resource teacher found guilty of murdering her husband. [WLKY]

The cheerleader death story has apparently gone national. [HuffPo]

Metro Council members said they will pursue new zoning rules that require boarding house operators to get a license as neighbors complain the group homes continue to plague West Louisville. [WAVE3]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

When you’re rated worse than Katie King (the girl whose daddy bought her a judgeship), you know you ought to just give up and get a job at Walmart. McLaughlin, a Jefferson County district court judge, is the lowest-rated judge in the county by a wide margin, according to a recently released survey by the Louisville Bar Association. [WFPL]

Just before approving a rate increase of 5.5 percent to raise about $9 million, the Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday voted to spend up to $600,000 on bonuses to most of the agency’s 600 employees. [More C-J/AKN]

A proposal to convert Colston Park in Jeffersonville into a housing development is facing opposition from nearby homeowners. [Business First]

If you live in Southern Indiana, you need to comment on this transportation plan. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Content With Living In Fantasy World

A Louisville non-profit says the mayor’s proposed budget cuts its funding by more than $13,000. They say it’s money that could mean the difference between life and death. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer says the LG&E fee compromise will cause pain. What planet is this man living on? As if the original proposal wasn’t even worse for the average citizen? Message to Greg: Stop listening to the mega-wealthy people you surround yourself with. Most people can’t afford to pay an extra couple hundred bucks per year to cover your every whim and want. You walk into disaster after disaster with your foot in your mouth and look more like an out-of-touch fool each time. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival made the list of must-see summer music according to Vogue. [WHAS11]

About two dozen people attended a $1,000-a-plate breakfast in January for a U.S. Senate candidate from Kentucky. They gathered at the Washington lobbying firm Podesta Group, founded by Democratic power brokers Tony and John Podesta, the latter of whom advises President Barack Obama on climate change policy, including last week’s proposed greenhouse gas restrictions. [John Cheves]

A driver was shot while driving along Interstate 265 (Gene Snyder Freeway) on Saturday. [WLKY]

The federal judge who struck down Wisconsin’s gay marriage ban thinks state officials have a thing or two to learn about the history of marriage as a social institution. [HuffPo]

For all the races Saturday at Churchill Downs, there was one horse people couldn’t get off their minds. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. Because we don’t charge you a subscription fee, don’t plaster the entire page with ads and most certainly don’t cover theme parks just because their owners pay advertising pots of gold. [Click Here For Details]

From the Department of Things That Are Just For Show… Joined by dozens of residents and elected officials, the Jefferson County Republican Party opened new headquarters in west Louisville on Saturday in an effort to better reach black voters. [WFPL]

The Triple Crown drought continues as California Chrome failed to win the Belmont Stakes. [HuffPo]

Officials from Louisville-based Norton Healthcare Inc. and the University of Louisville have been meeting in the last week for mediation related to the dispute about Kosair Children’s Hospital. [Business First]

A large downtown hotel and retail development project could be in jeopardy, following concerns of a sewer board member about a pipe proposed to run underneath the development. [News & Tribune]