Hating The Gays Is Really Expensive

Horse racing fans can now purchase their tickets to Churchill Downs races through Ticketmaster, according to a press release from the racetrack. [WDRB]

Louisville leaders have spent decades preaching about the need for a better-trained workforce to strengthen the local economy and improve prospects for workers facing increasingly complex and technologically advanced workplaces. [C-J/AKN]

The Cardinals have returned to their nest. The University of Louisville is once again bustling with students on the first day of classes. [WHAS11]

The private attorneys whom Beshear hired to handle the state’s appeals have a $260,000 contract, of which $231,348 had been paid by July 20, according to state records. Total cost to taxpayers: $2,351,297. [H-L]

The coroner has released the name of a teenager found fatally shot Saturday night outside a southwest Jefferson County apartment building. [WLKY]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Be prepared: the living dead are ready to take over Louisville. And they’re not talking about the way you feel after listening to Greg Fischer speak. [WAVE3]

If you’ve followed the saga involving Joshua Powell and Montgomery County Schools? This episode of This American Life will send chills down your spin. [This American Life]

Louisville’s new effort to make dangerous intersections safer could have unforeseen consequences. Metro Police have begun ticketing jaywalking pedestrians and motorists who don’t yield at crosswalks. Rolf Eisinger, the city’s bicycle and pedestrian coordinator, said Metro government is seeking to prevent pedestrian deaths. But the crackdown could have a disproportionate effect on minorities and low-income people. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama has been briefed on developments in global financial markets, the White House said on Monday after world stock markets plunged. [Reuters]

When more than 1,500 acres inside the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center recently received megasite certification, it did so under the exacting standards of the automotive industry. [Business First]

During a strategic plan update, Greater Clark County Schools Superintendent Andrew Melin said whichever way the district’s referendum shakes out, administrators will be busy after November. [News & Tribune]

Apparently Another Horsey Thing Happened

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

After last month’s fire, stabilization work on Whiskey Row is now on schedule. [WDRB]

When it comes to preventing serious infections that people sometimes get at hospitals, many institutions in the Louisville area and Southern Indiana have some work to do, according to new ratings by Consumer Reports. [C-J/AKN]

Community members joined together at Shelby Park Sunday to bring a new energy to the space. This comes after a week of violence in the area, including two shootings, one ultimately ending in death. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Derby was very good for Churchill Downs, but Big Fish has been even better. The Louisville-based gambling and racetrack company announced late Wednesday that it had record revenue of more than $409 million in the quarter that ended June 30. [H-L]

No arrests have been made in connection with a deadly house fire last month in Old Louisville. [WLKY]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee is open to the idea of using federal troops and the FBI to stop women from having abortions. [HuffPo]

American Pharoah took an easy win at the Haskell Invitation on Sunday at Monmouth Park in New Jersey. [WAVE3]

Thursday marks the true opening salvo in the GOP presidential race, as the top 10 candidates are slated to face off in the long-awaited Fox News debate. [The Hill]

The Outskirts Festival, which seeks to highlight female-led or female-driven bands, has announced the lineup for its second year. [WFPL]

Matt Jones, the popular host of a radio sports talk show, stepped on some powerful toes Saturday while playing the part of Fancy Farm political speaking emcee in a non-traditional way. [Ronnie Ellis]

The new owners of the Republic Building in downtown Louisville plan to convert the historic structure into a hotel. [Business First]

How would you define success? Business suits, six figures and mortgages are likely the first answer for most Americans. Or maybe it’s a job that allows for enough free time to spend with loved ones. [News & Tribune]

Give Thanks For The Needle Exchange

Metro Louisville’s needle exchange program designed to combat the heroin crisis kicks off today. [WDRB]

What’s that? One of Greg Fischer’s “innovation” team members was tazed and arrested after allegedly leaving a child in a hot car? And he works for former Metro Animal Services shyster Donald Robinson? Surely not. [C-J/AKN]

What the hell is wrong with people these days?! [WHAS11]

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told lawmakers Monday that state officials would work with Fayette County staff to develop a plan aimed at closing the achievement gap. [H-L]

Really, what the hell is wrong with people!? Louisville Metro Police investigators were at Ballard Park again Tuesday morning, collecting evidence after a 9-year-old boy was shot Monday night. [WLKY]

Next season’s flu shot will contain two new flu strains that weren’t present in last season’s shot, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

These data only include base pay and don’t include monstrous payouts from, say, the UofL Foundation. [WAVE3]

The rate of abortions falls across almost all of the US since 2010, a new survey from the Associated Press suggests. [BBC]

Bluegrass musicians played a Kentucky-flavored tune at the graduation ceremony last week for nine graduates, who received their bachelor of fine arts degree. [WFPL]

After watching the biggest donors increasingly shun the major political parties and send their six-figure checks to super-PACs and other outside spending groups, Republican and Democratic leaders in Congress made a sly bid last December to bring billionaires and millionaires back into the party fold. [Mother Jones]

American Pharoah wasn’t a shoo-in to win the Triple Crown. But his prospects for victory appeared more likely than other Thoroughbreds that won both the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in recent years. [Business First]

A tiny park in the middle of downtown Jeffersonville is now easier to enjoy. [News & Tribune]

Thank Goodness The Primary’s Over

The company that owns Churchill Downs is suing the Daily Racing Form, alleging the publication’s online wagering service illegally took bets on races at the Louisville track during Kentucky Derby weekend. [WDRB]

You might say Louisville is more flabby than fit. The American College of Sports Medicine has again ranked the area near the bottom for fitness among the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas in its just-released 2015 American Fitness Index, which combines health behaviors, rates of chronic health problems and community indicators such as recreational facilities and farmers’ markets. [C-J/AKN]

Package-delivery giant UPS will pay more than $25 million to settle charges it submitted false claims to the federal government in connection with delivery of Next Day Air overnight packages, the Department of Justice said Tuesday. [WHAS11]

You should check out this interactive map of last night’s vote results from across Kentucky. [H-L]

The teevee folks claimed no problems were reported while voting yesterday even after the Office of the Attorney General issued press releases listing the number of calls regarding problems per county. [WLKY]

After hearing story after story from voters on the campaign trail about heroin’s toll, Hillary Clinton instructed her policy team to draw up solutions to the burgeoning opiate epidemic. [HuffPo]

JCPS is really good at being awful when it comes to buses. A parent of a Jefferson County Public Schools student is suing the district, claiming a school bus dragged his son along a St. Matthews road in 2013. [WAVE3]

Kentucky hates old people. States with at least 40 percent of homes ranked on the bottom two rungs include North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. [Newsweek]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ Audit Committee has approved giving a Louisville auditing firm a $65,000 contract to see through changes to tighten the university’s financial controls and make it less prone to fraud. [WFPL]

Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren’t overweight, a U.S. study suggests. [Reuters]

Humana Inc. is continuing its commitment to hire an average of 500 veterans and military spouses each year. [Business First]

Though the closure is only expected to last until construction is completed on the new Farmers Market pavilion, some business owners chided the city for shutting down a second block of Bank Street so that vendors could set up booths. [News & Tribune]

Will JCPS Have A Scandal-Free Week?

It appears Jefferson County Public Schools wants to move forward with plans to centralize the district’s application and acceptance process for its magnet schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether public schools could force all students to submit to random drug testing, as Louisville’s private Trinity High School has decided to do. But constitutional experts say it is unlikely the court would allow such testing at public schools, unless there was a suspicion that individual students were using drugs. [C-J/AKN]

Almost a week after an incredible Derby race, another amazing event took place at Churchill Downs Friday afternoon. Just before Race 7, a mile-long turf race, a horse broke out of the starting gate and managed to dump it’s jockey. [WHAS11]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police say a worker at an aluminum plant has been killed in an accident. [WLKY]

The urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. [HuffPo]

A local mother is fired up after she says her rights were violated when she was told she couldn’t breastfeed in an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday defended his support for a measure in the USA Patriot Act that has anchored a National Security Agency program to collect Americans’ phone data. [Reuters]

The total number of homeless residents in Louisville decreased about 14 percent in the past year, according to the 2014 Louisville Homeless Census. [WFPL]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

As the number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana continues to grow, Gov. Mike Pence signed an act meant to combat the IV drug use problem underlying the epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Only 50 Weeks Til City’s Next Cleanup

All of these resignations are the result of not just Helene Kramer but Donna Hargens. Don’t let anyone try to tell you otherwise. And if you think Hargens’ push to hire an outside law firm isn’t another effort to avoid accountability, you’re lost. You’re going to love what comes out over the next few weeks. [WDRB]

As Jefferson County Public Schools works to simplify and provide more parity in its magnet application process, duPont Manual High is proposing one solution: Let Manual pick its students first. [C-J/AKN]

Police are investigating the death of a man found in Phillips Lane. [WHAS11]

Gerald and Nancy Barton are in a fix. After an April 3 storm flooded their Louisville home, they had to tear out the floorboards and the bottom half of the wallboards. But they can’t get the permits they need to repair the damage. [H-L]

The mother of a Louisville man found shot to death Wednesday morning spoke to WLKY. Cordell Richardson, 28, was discovered inside a car parked at an apartment complex on Navaho Court in north Radcliff around 6:40 a.m. [WLKY]

Famously animal-loving Jon Stewart is said to have bought a farm in New Jersey, for purposes of giving home to rescued farm animals. [HuffPo]

Two men are suing a Catholic priest, the Louisville archdiocese and a Dominican nun, claiming they were sexually abused by the priest in the 1970s and the church failed to protect them. [WAVE3]

What the Kentucky Derby owes to China. If it weren’t for KFC’s giant Asian consumer base, the annual classic would be a much poorer event. [Politico]

The names for these prize-winning racehorses might be whimsical, but the name-approval process is fairly dull and bureaucratic. A racehorse owner must first submit the preferred name to The Jockey Club, the body that governs horse racing, says Claire Novak, online features editor for The Blood Horse magazine. [WFPL]

It was a record-breaking 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (Grade I) at Churchill Downs Racetrack which culminated as 123,763 fans, the highest attendance of all time, watched a memorable win by Lovely Maria. The prior attendance record was 116,046, set in 2010, during the 136th running of the Kentucky Oaks. [Press Release]

Anybody at Churchill Downs Racetrack yesterday can attest that it was an absolutely gorgeous day to watch the Kentucky Derby and experience the grandeur of it all. [Business First]

Growth is the common theme underscoring the mayoral primary election for a city councilman and the incumbent who each face challenges Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Y’all Holding Your Breath On UofL?

U.S. Senior District Judge John G. Heyburn II, a Republican who carved an independent and progressive path in three decades on the federal bench, upholding school desegregation and striking down laws that forbade gay marriage, died Wednesday, according to U.S. District Court clerk Vanessa Armstrong. [C-J/AKN]

Dozens of horses have tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs – including speed – at the racecourse which will host the Kentucky Derby this weekend. [Daily Mail]

A member of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees has asked Kentucky Auditor Adam Edelen to conduct a “truly independent accounting” of the finances of the university and its separate, $1.1 billion foundation, following reports by WDRB and other media of million-dollar executive compensation packages. [WDRB]

A five-year-old kindergartner at Maupin Elementary has died after being struck by a car while waiting for her bus Wednesday morning, a spokesman with the Louisville Metro Police Department has confirmed. [C-J/AKN]

In a videotaped deposition and several documents released Tuesday, which include a letter written by Louisville native Father Gilbert “Allen” Tarlton, the priest admits to several incidents where he engaged in sexual misconduct with students or children in his care. [WHAS11]

A Kentucky Court of Appeals panel heard arguments Tuesday on whether a circuit court judge was correct when he ruled last year that Bluegrass Pipeline cannot use eminent domain to take private property for construction of a natural gas liquids pipeline. [H-L]

The great weather has brought hundreds of racing fans to the backside of Churchill Downs in the early morning hours this week. [WLKY]

The case for garden-based learning in schools seems simple, even obvious, at first: What harm could there be in encouraging young children to connect with nature and learn more about the ecology around them, including where the food they eat comes from? [HuffPo]

It’s hard to steal the smile of a 9-year-old. Especially Taylor Maddux, a playful 3rd grader at Coral Ridge Elementary School. But instead of practicing her cheers or hanging with her friends, Taylor is lying in a hospital bed fighting to recover after a bizarre and freak accident at a Louisville Metro Park. [WAVE3]

An environmental group has identified what it calls the 50 communities in Central Appalachia that are most at risk from mountaintop removal and 17 are in Kentucky, including the most at risk, Kryton, located in Perry County. [Ronnie Ellis]

WFPL’s community conversation Thursday (from April 17) on the surge of heroin addiction in the region drew a wide range of participants, including public health officials, treatment professionals and people in recovery. [WFPL]

Ford reports lower-than-expected profits for the first three months of 2015 after it sells fewer vehicles in North America and continues to lose money in Europe and South America. [BBC]

One of the greatest beneficiaries of the Kentucky Derby’s economic ripple effect is the hotel and hospitality industry. [Business First]

Eight Jeffersonville City Council candidates — none who are incumbent — are vying for positions in three districts, and all of them are Democrats. Districts two, three and five are uncontested in the primary election. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]