Getting Extra-Compassionate In Time For Derby

What’s new? Another day, another murder here in Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Holly Liter spends many weekends cleaning up vomit, picking up trash and explaining to her 11-year-old daughter what marijuana smells like. “It can be a nightmare,” she said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city is definitely experiencing deja vu with the jail again. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s public universities and colleges will be limited to tuition increases that range between 4.6 percent and 6.1 percent next school year for in-state undergraduate students, the Council on Postsecondary Education decided Tuesday. [H-L]

Residents in the Smoketown neighborhood have won a victory after the Metro Sewer District approved changes to a storm water storage basin after outcry from the community. [WLKY]

How the military is preparing for the possibility of a very different kind of Commander in Chief. [HuffPo]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made it official on Tuesday, throwing his support behind Hillary Clinton for president in advance of the May 17 Kentucky Democratic primary. [WAVE3]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Sellus Wilder said he wants to run as a “progressive” candidate in a state where he believes Democrats run races like Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

Ann Morrison first noticed a change in her hearing three years ago. The 73-year-old who lives in Goshen, Ky., said she began missing parts of important conversations, turning up the television volume and growing increasingly frustrated. [WFPL]

Ten months ago, three teenaged boys who had escaped from a group home in Brooklyn were arrested for the violent assault and rape of a woman in Manhattan. The boys had been placed in the home as part of a program run by New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, which had been seeking alternatives to formal detention facilities for troubled youngsters caught up in the juvenile justice system. [ProPublica]

The Young Professionals Association of Louisville has announced its new board of directors and officers for 2016-17. [Business First]

Heidi Cruz, wife of Republican presidential candidate and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped in Jeffersonville to talk to the local GOP at Kye’s II on Friday afternoon. [News & Tribune]

A Local Legend Is Leaving WHAS11

A natl television station wants to hear from millennials in Kentucky who have no interest in the current election or are overwhelmed. Contact Jake for details. [Get In Touch]

Thousands of people in the Russell neighborhood get a chance to shape the future of their community. [WDRB]

Since the run up to the 2013 Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs has instituted a points system to determine starters in the first leg of America’s Triple Crown series, moving away from graded stakes earnings as a determining factor. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! As the spirit of volunteering has taken over the city, the Build-a-Bed event at Meyzeek Middle School kicked off Mayor Greg Fischer’s 5th Annual Give a Day Week of Service. [WHAS11]

“Get out! Leftist scum! Get out!” In the video, the bearded white man wears a black shirt and a red baseball cap with the words Make America Great Again. He is yelling at a young black woman. He shoves her once, then again, screaming at her to leave. The crowd around him is agitated. Others push the woman as well. Many are yelling. [H-L]

Do you, like most people, forget that there’s a professional soccer team in Louisville? [WLKY]

If you run a business, are employed by one, care about the stability of the financial system, or would prefer that the U.S. economy not be needlessly thrown into disarray — a group that seems like a pretty broad coalition of voters — Cruz’s economic policy is not OK. [HuffPo]

Middle school girls came together Saturday to learn, network and have fun. [WAVE3]

For decades some of the poorest people in the US have lived in subsidised housing developments often known as “projects”. Many of these projects, however, are now being torn down and studies suggest only one in three residents find a home in the mixed-income developments built to replace them. [BBC]

Angel wings dangle from Rose Smith’s ears and hang from her wrist. [WFPL]

In this week’s installment of Hanging On, Weekend Edition’s series about issues facing the middle class, we ask why some of the country’s biggest banks are still “too big to fail.” [NPR]

One of Louisville’s best-known TV journalists is retiring after 31 years in the market. Melissa Swan’s last day at WHAS-TV will be April 21. [Business First]

This is straight out of Parks & Recreation. For Indiana’s Bicentennial, the Jeffersonville Public Arts Commission is pulling strings to create something its never created before: a puppet show. [News & Tribune]

Pedestrian Deaths, Shootings And JCPS Bus Crashes Are All The Rage In Compassionate City

No one thinks the Omni Hotel will live up to all the Fischer-pushed hype. Not even the people surrounding Fischer. [WDRB]

It’s now painfully clear that A Kentucky Newspaper’s education reporter will regurgitate whatever JCPS tells her without question. We had high hopes for her. Shame on us. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The students over at Bellarmine University are on a rescue mission. [WHAS11]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced Friday afternoon that he is retiring after 34 years with the agency. [H-L]

Another day, another JCPS bus crash. A Jefferson County Public Schools bus driver was injured Tuesday morning in a crash on Bardstown Road at Little Springs Boulevard, just south of the Gene Snyder Freeway. [WLKY]

The same crap is happening in Kentucky but the KDP is sitting on its hands. In South Dakota, Governor Dennis Daugaard is right this moment mulling over a bill sent to his desk by the legislature that would bar transgender students — kids often facing bullying and discrimination — from using bathrooms or locker rooms that correspond with their gender identity. [HuffPo]

Six months ago, Tracy Blue was waxing poetic about “Modern Louisville,” a new magazine geared to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities, the fourth print venture that her husband, University of Louisville trustee Jonathan Blue launched with her listed as publisher. [WAVE3]

Over a lifetime following government and politics as a spectator and for many years as a reporter, I’ve reached some conclusions. Campaigns matter. They tell us things about candidates and usually, though not always, what sort of office-holders they’ll likely be. Visions and philosophies are shared and promises made. Campaigns often reveal how the candidate operates under pressure as well as insights into character. [Ronnie Ellis]

There will be more court-appointed attorneys available to represent poor people in court under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget. [WFPL]

We started getting some clarity in the Republican and Democratic races Saturday night. Hillary Clinton squeaked out a win in Nevada — but did so in a way that suggests she has, despite Bernie Sanders’s strength, maintained her national advantage. Marco Rubio’s strong showing in South Carolina helped push Jeb Bush out of the race, giving Mr. Rubio a chance to unify the mainstream of the Republican Party and bring about a true three-way race. [NY Times]

A more than $6.2 million expansion could be coming to a senior living facility in southeast Louisville. [Business First]

For more than 14 years, foster parents William Yowell and Lizzette Steed-Yowell have opened their New Albany home to children whose lives have been turned upside down by neglect or abuse. The couple stresses the importance of providing a safe home for children in need, but there’s another ingredient they say is even more impactful: Open hearts. [News & Tribune]

Attacks On Ricky Jones Are Just Dumb

Sitting near the corner of Bardstown Road and Grinstead Drive, a new business is getting ready to open in the Highlands. But the new development is also sparking concern among some neighbors. [WDRB]

Watching people pile on to attack Ricky Jones is bizarre. All he did was speak up with a bit of common sense and people lost their minds. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A member of an advisory committee that is reviewing the allegations of strippers and escorts for the University of Louisville men’s basketball program says he is surprised by the school’s decision to self-impose a ban on postseason play. [WHAS11]

If you missed it, this is one of the most important stories in the history of ever. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The man charged with killing three people on Wheeler Avenue over the weekend knew at least one of his victims. [WLKY]

As president, both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders would expand the federal government’s role in reforming criminal justice across the country, they told The Huffington Post in answer to a 20-question survey last month. What would the Republican candidates do? They didn’t say. [HuffPo]

From behind the shadow of the Economy Inn, another hotel is coming into the limelight for all the wrong reasons. [WAVE3]

Marco Rubiobot on Monday insisted the immigration reform bill he helped spearhead through the Senate was never intended to become law and that the authors of the bill expected conservatives in the House to make it “even better.” [NBC News]

A renovated warehouse in the Portland neighborhood will be the new home for the University of Louisville’s art studios. [WFPL]

A vote to block the Obama administration’s ambitious climate regulation was one of Antonin Scalia’s last acts as a Supreme Court justice. His sudden death may have opened a new path to the rule’s survival. [Reuters]

Jennifer Lawrence and her foundation have given Kosair Children’s Hospital an early Valentine’s Day gift. But at $2 million, the award-winning actress and native Louisvillian’s gift is a tad more generous than the traditional roses or chocolate. [Business First]

Southern Indiana residents are being asked to give their input into a region-wide arts project as part of a 14-month process that will result in a masterplan to better connect and strengthen the area’s arts and cultural assets over the next decade. [News & Tribune]

Hold On To Your Wigs Cause It’s Friday

The Louisville Fire and Rescue Tower 2 and Engine 5 arrived on the scene at Kosair Children’s Hospital. But they weren’t there to fight a fire. Instead, they were eager to visit with children and deliver toys. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is eyeing the idea of using some of the money freed up in its latest budget proposal to create a therapeutic elementary school. [C-J/AKN]

It’s unreal that you still can’t buy alcohol on Sunday in Indiana. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin excluded K-12 schools from funding cuts in an austere state budget proposal that would slash funding to Kentucky’s public universities. [H-L]

The Clarksville Family Aquatic Center will not open this season. [WLKY]

In 2008, then-Senator Barack Obama promised to unite Washington and the nation behind progressive change. Then-Sen. Hillary Clinton mocked him. [HuffPo]

Neighbors in southwest Jefferson County are speaking out about a section of the Louisville Loop that could consequently take from their yards. [WAVE3]

The state’s minimum hourly wage would be raised to $10.10 over the next two and half years under a bill that cleared a House committee today. House Bill 278, sponsored by House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, would increase Kentucky’s current minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to $8.20 this August, $9.15 in July 2017 and $10.10 in July 2018. The increase would not apply to businesses that have a recent average annual gross volume of sales of less than $500,000. [Press Release]

An employee at a state juvenile-detention center failed to appropriately monitor a 16-year-old girl who was found dead earlier this month, the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet said Wednesday. [WFPL]

Reminder: This is one of the guys Bevin trusts to cut 9% from the budget at his discretion. [Page One]

At least six bidders vied for Louisville-based GE Appliances, according to a new report from Reuters. [Business First]

State Sen. Erin Houchin filed as a candidate for United States Representative on the Republican primary ballot in Indiana’s 9th Congressional District. [News & Tribune]

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Local Media Turns Into 1980s D.A.R.E.

We love that the West End is seeing a rebirth of sorts. There’s a new push to boost home sales in Louisville’s poorest neighborhoods. [WDRB]

The dumb is thick in Oldham County. A lawsuit that questions the validity of Oldham County’s recent wet-dry referendum could delay officials’ plans to expand alcohol sales countywide. [C-J/AKN]

The clerk-treasurer of Selllersburg, Indiana has filed a complaint saying she has faced retaliation after raising questions about the town spending. [WHAS11]

Will Jim Gray beat Rand Paul? Probably not with his current team that consists almost entirely of Conway people. Stranger things have happened, though. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Any high school in the U.S. that wants to carry an emergency opioid overdose reversal kit will now be able to get one free of charge, thanks to a new initiative announced Monday by the Clinton Foundation and the drug’s manufacturer. [HuffPo]

Quick, everybody freak out about drugs! A new trend is leading down a dangerous path. People think they are buying prescription pills to get high, but they are given something even more addictive. [WAVE3]

With the new year comes the continued challenge for area nonprofits to serve as many families and residents in need as possible. To energize those efforts, employees of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company are lending a hand. Coupled with financial support from the LG&E and KU Foundation, the utilities’ voluntary employee-giving campaign, Power of One, raised more than $1.7 million in contributions. [Richmond Register]

A cedar log carved into a double helix with a chainsaw. A collection of wood veneer scraps twisted and wrapped to look like a tree trunk. A round sculpture built out of woven straw that is implanted with mushroom spores. [WFPL]

Of all things for Adam Edelen to attack, he chose to hit Rand Paul on foreign policy. That may be the only thing most Democrats can stomach from Paul. He’s also wrong about sexual orientation. Anti-gay discrimination is alive and well in Kentucky. Hell, the Kentucky Democratic Party runs so quickly away from the gays that it’s alarming. We can all agree that Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is a delusional troll. But Adam Edelen needs to check his straight, white, male privilege once in a while before spouting off in another sweaty rant. [Roll Call]

The $5.4 billion price tag for GE Appliances was “a pleasant surprise,” General Electric Co. CEO Jeff Immelt said. [Business First]

For better or worse, an ordinance to require approval from the New Albany City Council for additional appropriations on projects was rejected at Thursday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]