Hold On To Your Wigs Cause It’s Friday

The Louisville Fire and Rescue Tower 2 and Engine 5 arrived on the scene at Kosair Children’s Hospital. But they weren’t there to fight a fire. Instead, they were eager to visit with children and deliver toys. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools is eyeing the idea of using some of the money freed up in its latest budget proposal to create a therapeutic elementary school. [C-J/AKN]

It’s unreal that you still can’t buy alcohol on Sunday in Indiana. [WHAS11]

Matt Bevin excluded K-12 schools from funding cuts in an austere state budget proposal that would slash funding to Kentucky’s public universities. [H-L]

The Clarksville Family Aquatic Center will not open this season. [WLKY]

In 2008, then-Senator Barack Obama promised to unite Washington and the nation behind progressive change. Then-Sen. Hillary Clinton mocked him. [HuffPo]

Neighbors in southwest Jefferson County are speaking out about a section of the Louisville Loop that could consequently take from their yards. [WAVE3]

The state’s minimum hourly wage would be raised to $10.10 over the next two and half years under a bill that cleared a House committee today. House Bill 278, sponsored by House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, would increase Kentucky’s current minimum wage of $7.25 an hour to $8.20 this August, $9.15 in July 2017 and $10.10 in July 2018. The increase would not apply to businesses that have a recent average annual gross volume of sales of less than $500,000. [Press Release]

An employee at a state juvenile-detention center failed to appropriately monitor a 16-year-old girl who was found dead earlier this month, the state Justice and Public Safety Cabinet said Wednesday. [WFPL]

Reminder: This is one of the guys Bevin trusts to cut 9% from the budget at his discretion. [Page One]

At least six bidders vied for Louisville-based GE Appliances, according to a new report from Reuters. [Business First]

State Sen. Erin Houchin filed as a candidate for United States Representative on the Republican primary ballot in Indiana’s 9th Congressional District. [News & Tribune]

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Local Media Turns Into 1980s D.A.R.E.

We love that the West End is seeing a rebirth of sorts. There’s a new push to boost home sales in Louisville’s poorest neighborhoods. [WDRB]

The dumb is thick in Oldham County. A lawsuit that questions the validity of Oldham County’s recent wet-dry referendum could delay officials’ plans to expand alcohol sales countywide. [C-J/AKN]

The clerk-treasurer of Selllersburg, Indiana has filed a complaint saying she has faced retaliation after raising questions about the town spending. [WHAS11]

Will Jim Gray beat Rand Paul? Probably not with his current team that consists almost entirely of Conway people. Stranger things have happened, though. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another shooting in Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Any high school in the U.S. that wants to carry an emergency opioid overdose reversal kit will now be able to get one free of charge, thanks to a new initiative announced Monday by the Clinton Foundation and the drug’s manufacturer. [HuffPo]

Quick, everybody freak out about drugs! A new trend is leading down a dangerous path. People think they are buying prescription pills to get high, but they are given something even more addictive. [WAVE3]

With the new year comes the continued challenge for area nonprofits to serve as many families and residents in need as possible. To energize those efforts, employees of Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company are lending a hand. Coupled with financial support from the LG&E and KU Foundation, the utilities’ voluntary employee-giving campaign, Power of One, raised more than $1.7 million in contributions. [Richmond Register]

A cedar log carved into a double helix with a chainsaw. A collection of wood veneer scraps twisted and wrapped to look like a tree trunk. A round sculpture built out of woven straw that is implanted with mushroom spores. [WFPL]

Of all things for Adam Edelen to attack, he chose to hit Rand Paul on foreign policy. That may be the only thing most Democrats can stomach from Paul. He’s also wrong about sexual orientation. Anti-gay discrimination is alive and well in Kentucky. Hell, the Kentucky Democratic Party runs so quickly away from the gays that it’s alarming. We can all agree that Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is a delusional troll. But Adam Edelen needs to check his straight, white, male privilege once in a while before spouting off in another sweaty rant. [Roll Call]

The $5.4 billion price tag for GE Appliances was “a pleasant surprise,” General Electric Co. CEO Jeff Immelt said. [Business First]

For better or worse, an ordinance to require approval from the New Albany City Council for additional appropriations on projects was rejected at Thursday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

A Rich Neighborhood Is Fun & Fancy

Louisville’s best kept white flight secret that no one can afford to live in or visit, maybe. Seems convenient to trot out after a bit of bad news. [WDRB]

Everybody is freaking out about the latest Jefferson County Public Schools budget. [C-J/AKN]

40 days of peace. In a row. In Louisville. HAHAHAHA. [WHAS11]

Officials are preparing for the complete closure of an Ohio River bridge at Louisville to allow construction crews to make improvements to the 52-year-old bridge. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A new exhibit at the Muhammad Ali Center, called ‘Selma to Montgomery,’ is paying tribute to civil rights leaders that made an impact for voting rights in the 1960s. [WLKY]

The Obama administration, in the first major review of the country’s coal program in three decades, on Friday ordered a pause on issuing coal-mining leases on federal land as part of new executive actions to fight climate change. [HuffPo]

Let’s all act as if Rick Pitino isn’t looking for a way out. It’ll be fun. [WAVE3]

The McConathy Farm Rescue Team has rescued nearly 60 horses to date and recently took in seven horses between the ages of two and 10 from a farm in Lawrenceburg. [WKYT]

Louisville business and political leaders say the planned sale of General Electric’s appliance business to the Chinese company Haier is potentially a positive development for the city’s economy. [WFPL]

The United States on Saturday lifted sanctions against Iran and announced that four Americans held prisoner in the country will be returning home, in a whirlwind day of diplomacy that cements President Obama’s engagement with Iran as a pillar of his legacy. [The Hill]

Louisville needs about 3,700 workers in the health care sector, according to a third-quarter 2015 report from KentuckianaWorks, the city’s workforce development board. [Business First]

Clark County is up and running with a new software system to be used on planning and zoning projects. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Has Lost Its Damn Mind

Yep, local teevee folks are still freaking out. Sadly, people like Toni Konz have no idea how much damage their hyping is causing. Gotta keep meemaw afraid, of course. [WDRB]

Local media is still shitting the floor over misbehaving kids. Based on the reaction from teevee news readers and a select few current/former C-J reporters, you’d think this is the first time in history teenagers have behaved as unruly heathens. [C-J/AKN]

Okay, so maybe local teevee folks aren’t just freaking out – they’re *this close* to pooping in the floor. [WHAS11]

America’s newest family of Syrian refugees flew in late at night, and Sarhan Aldobai, 36, looked down from the plane at the distant lights of his new home. His wife was nursing their baby in the next seat. His five other children had fallen asleep. Sarhan took out the small world map he had carried since leaving Syria in 2012 and tried to trace the plane’s path. [H-L]

A southern Indiana official is refusing to certify election results for the Jeffersonville City Council, saying he has reason to believe at least one recount team did not accurately count returns. [WLKY]

The seven children had just crossed the river, shoes still caked with mud, when U.S. Border Patrol agents stopped them. [HuffPo]

Losing. Their. Damn. Minds. Exacerbated by the hype pushed by WDRB that 100% of JCPS kids are out-of-control devils. [WAVE3]

A Lexington couple is trying to raise thousands of dollars for a way to help their eight-year-old son. Jo and Donnie Grayson’s son, Thatcher, has autism. As he gets older, they worry more about him. [WKYT]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District is beginning work on a new air monitoring system that is designed to help pinpoint the causes of ozone pollution. [WFPL]

As soon as next year, a driver’s license may no longer be enough for airline passengers to clear security in some states, if the Department of Homeland Security has its way. [NY Times]

Loganberry Court in Louisville is the most expensive street in Kentucky. The average home price for Loganberry Court, which is off of Mockingbird Gardens Drive and near the Crescent Hill Golf Course, is $2,208,300. [Business First]

I sat in a rocker on Trish Roehm’s porch, between a dog bowl and a water bucket both as big as last spring’s potholes. When Bandit was not in my face, Flash or Otisco or Bonnie or Carmel or Trigger was. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another Compassionate Holiday Murder (Maybe)

Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found dead in the 2100 block of Dahlia Avenue, near the intersection of Bardstown Road and Lancashire Avenue, early Monday. [WDRB]

In a unanimous vote, the Louisville Metro Council moved to hold a significant chunk of Louisville’s $18.9 million surplus on Thursday in order to consider other uses for the funds. The decision came after members from both parties complained Mayor Greg Fischer’s office was not forthcoming with the full surplus amount and didn’t give council members much say over how the money should be allocated. [C-J/AKN]

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) is on Winter Break until classes resume on January 4. For many in our community who are busy during this time, school is not something at the forefront of their planning calendar. [WHAS11]

Some in Lexington may have Internet access about 22 times faster than their neighbors. Cable and Internet provider Windstream announced a 1-gigabit-per-second Internet service trial in Lexington on Friday, with the potential for a full launch during the first half of 2016, according to a company press release. [H-L]

Guess Cordish was desperate for some positive press? No, really, this is a good thing. Donated food and supplies were handed out to military and families in need Monday morning as part of the 11th annual Christmas Angel Program at Fourth Street Live. [WLKY]

The latest report on the Arctic by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration finds dwindling sea ice and temperatures as much as 3 Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) above average are disrupting walrus and fish populations and having major impacts on the ecosystem. [HuffPo]

Less than two weeks before the end of one of the deadliest years in Louisville’s history, roughly 100 people marched to remember the city’s murder victims Sunday afternoon. The Louisville Urban League hosted the walk. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama urged Americans to remain vigilant against the potential threat of homegrown Islamic State militants on Friday, acknowledging the difficulty of tracking “lone wolf” attackers like those who went on a shooting spree in California. [Reuters]

A Louisville state representative wants to tax electronic cigarette equipment and the liquid nicotine that the devices turn into smokeable vapor. [WFPL]

The Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the first time in nine years Wednesday. NPR’s Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, chief economist at John Hancock, about what this means for consumers. [NPR]

A Utah company has expanded in the Louisville market with the purchase of two senior-care facilities, effective Dec. 2. [Business First]

A meeting designed to answer questions about the 2015 Floyd County budget shortfall only created more Tuesday afternoon at the Pine View Government Center. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another Week of Messy UofL Scandals

As a cold snap reaches Kentuckiana this weekend one group is doing its best to keep the area’s homeless warm. [WDRB]

It’s almost like Jim Ramsey is being purposefully more terrible than usual in order to set Jerry Abramson up to take over. Ramsey is making Abramson look less terrible. [C-J/AKN]

According to Chief Rick Sanders, police found a 35-year-old man unconscious and unresponsive at the Red Carpet Inn on Hurstbourne Parkway. Jeffersontown officers who had received and been trained on how to use Naloxone were able to inject the man and get him to the hospital, saving his life. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s chief justice has denied a motion to remove a judge from all criminal cases but referred the case to a state disciplinary commission. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It has been a year and a half since a mother found her son killed and no one has been held accountable. [WLKY]

While the vast majority of Americans now have access to the Internet and mobile devices, regional and economic disparities persist for wired broadband access in the largest 100 American cities. [HuffPo]

The Center for Women and Families, a local non-profit organization that helps victims of domestic violence and abuse, needs help for the holidays with its Holiday Gift Card Drive. [WAVE3]

ICYMI: Matt Bevin took false equivalency to new levels this weekend when he used the sad situation in Johnson County to try to justify his special brand of Islamophobia. Unity and respect? Not so much. Empty words. [Page One]

The new head of the state’s Energy and Environment Cabinet, Charles Snavely, has been on the job for a little more than a week. It’s also been about that long since he served as an official on the state’s coal association governing board. [WFPL]

New calculations show that our already sizeable water footprint is 18% bigger than we thought. [BBC]

The University of Louisville and Norton Healthcare Inc. have reached a settlement agreement in their dispute surrounding Kosair Children’s Hospital. [Business First]

If the opening of the Big Four Bridge in Jeffersonville proved one thing, it’s that people want to get outdoors and exercise. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]