Shootings, Shootings & More Shootings

For the last year, signs with pictures and information about Crystal Rogers have been posted all over Bardstown. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has made important accomplishments this year but there have also been “obvious mistakes and omissions,” the district’s board said in its yearly performance evaluation of Superintendent Donna Hargens. [C-J/AKN]

School is right around the corner for Clarksville Community students and officials are already focusing the need for supplies. [WHAS11]

Massie’s ideas about “sovereignty” are an extreme example of the naïve thinking that fueled the Brexit vote, has propelled Trump’s candidacy and energizes Tea Party activists. It is our inner 4-year-old screaming, “You can’t tell me what to do!” [H-L]

One person was taken to the hospital after an overnight shooting in south Louisville. The shooting happened at about 2:30 a.m. at Déjà Vu on Taylor Boulevard, near Longfield Avenue. [WLKY]

Senate Republicans have never made it easy for President Barack Obama to put judges on federal courts. But now, with just months left in his term, they’re not even pretending to try to let judicial nominees through. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun shooting in Compassionate City! [WAVE3]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin proclaims the days of “pay to play” ended with his arrival in Frankfort. But some House Democrats say if you’re not willing to play, Bevin isn’t reluctant to make you pay. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Lexington city council committee will soon review constable policies in the central Kentucky community. [WFPL]

The coal industry is slated to lose clout in the next Congress, with term limits set to force out a chairman who has frequently battled with the Obama administration on behalf of mining companies. Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Keeping Eastern Kentucky Impoverished) will relinquish the gavel of the House Appropriations Committee in January, after having led the powerful panel for six years, which is the maximum allowed under GOP rules. [The Hill]

The Louisville Sports Commission has named a new slate of officers and appointed new board members. [Business First]

The contract for newly hired town manager of Clarksville has been approved and Kevin Baity is scheduled to start June 30. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Shootings & Racist Statues

The Muhammad Ali Center has received a $500,000 grant from The UPS Foundation to honor the boxer’s legacy, according to a news release. [WDRB]

A citizens’ petition requesting landmark designation for a house threatened with demolition in the Upper Highlands has halted the issuance of a wrecking permit for the site on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Leave it to E-town to burn down a restaurant with a cancer stick. Firefighters say an ignited cigarette thrown into a bed of dry mulch is believed to have started a fire that destroyed a McDonald’s restaurant in Elizabethtown. [WHAS11]

Ford Motor Co. executives spared no expense in overhauling the crown jewel of their empire, the F-150. They gave the truck a new aluminum body, smaller turbocharged engines and a lighter and stronger steel frame – all with an eye to appease U.S. regulators demanding cleaner vehicles. The initiative took six years and cost Ford more than $1 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Jefferson County judge has ruled that a Confederate monument near the University of Louisville can be removed and relocated. [WLKY]

A top official in the George W. Bush administration has become the most prominent Republican to endorse Hillary Clinton for president. [HuffPo]

A South Louisville woman trying to keep someone from getting into her apartment was shot late this past week. [WAVE3]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

While Republicans and Democrats differ wildly on firearms issues in Congress, opposition to gun control measures transcends political parties in Kentucky. [WFPL]

Democrats pushing for gun curbs after the latest mass shooting in the United States are co-opting a Republican mantra to build public support and defang opposition: it’s time to get tough on national security. [Reuters]

Ford is shortening its traditional two-week summer shutdown to one week at its sport utility vehicle manufacturing plants in Louisville, Chicago and Oakville, Ontario, according to a news release. [Business First]

The Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana has to wait at least until next month for the New Albany City Council’s funding resolution to go for a final vote. [News & Tribune]

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All The Kudos To Greg Fischer

Louisville Metro Police are responding to a report of a shooting in the Middletown area. [WDRB]

A Louisville Metro Police officer is in stable condition after he was shot late Saturday night in the Russell neighborhood after a foot chase with a Louisville man, police said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was the most insane story of the week locally, right? [WHAS11]

The publisher and author of escort Katina Powell’s book alleging that former Louisville men’s basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers for sex parties at the Cardinals’ dormitory have countersued Louisville students, saying they attempted to “extort” a monetary settlement in their action alleging Powell and the book devalued their education. [H-L]

Metro United Way and the Center for Women and Families announced a partnership for 211 to expand its services in Louisville. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton’s first speech since she won a majority of pledged delegates in the Democratic presidential race included remarks about how abortion relates to other issues. That’s groundbreaking for a presidential candidate. [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer is calling on Louisville and southern Indiana residents to join him in marching in the Kentuckiana Pride Parade on Friday as a show of compassion and unity. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

A woman who was shot by a Jefferson County constable in a Walmart parking lot has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the county government. The county will pay $75,000 in damages to Pedro and Tammie Ortiz on behalf of Constable David Whitlock, who shot Tammie Ortiz in November 2011. That brings the cost of the shooting for Jefferson County taxpayers to six figures, since the county has already paid more than $37,000 to Whitlock’s attorneys. [WFPL]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

A Louisville-based package-design company is expanding internationally. [Business First]

In the hopes of taking advantage of expected growth, the City of Charlestown could create a redevelopment authority board that would be able to borrow money and get to work. [News & Tribune]

Just Bulldoze The Damn Racist Statue

The city’s parks department has pledged to change how it collects money at Iroquois Amphitheater after an audit found cash management practices there were “inadequate.” [WDRB]

Richard Braudus stood outside Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home in the Parkland neighborhood holding a portrait of the boxing legend and talking about their friendship as dozens gathered to take photographs and mourn the former heavyweight champion’s death. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It was another successful year for the WHAS Crusade for Children. The annual campaign raised more than $5.4 million this year. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky has spent more than $5 million in the last year to fix federal billing issues involving a Hazard cardiology practice it acquired three years ago, but UK officials have declined to provide documents detailing problems that led to the payments. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Metro police are investigating after shots were fired near Algonquin Park, sending people running in fear. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali was a man made of love, kindness and faith. In a 1974 interview with journalist David Frost, Ali said these were three of several qualities that he hoped people would always remember about him, long after the day he died. [HuffPo]

PEE ALERT! Thomas McAdam, notorious for saying some of the most heinous, racist shit you can imagine, is dropping a racist as a client? Please. [WAVE3]

This should make the Beshear Family happy. New payday loan sharking rules won’t stop predatory lenders. [The Intercept]

Maybe it was the way his life transected areas that define America – race and religion; war and sports – or perhaps it was his own love for words. Whatever the reason, Muhammad Ali’s life and career inspired writing that was nearly as captivating as the man himself. [WFPL]

Muhammad Ali crafted the plan for his final tribute years ago, long before he died. On Friday, his family will honor him just like he planned, with a global celebration in his hometown. [Richmond Register]

Louisville vegans, rejoice: The partners behind NOLAfare are opening their first restaurant. [Business First]

Individual health insurance costs are expected to climb across Indiana in 2017 as insurers continue to grapple with rising health care expenses and a market that was only recently overhauled by the federal Affordable Care Act. [News & Tribune]

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Your Governor Is Still Super-Dumb, Folks

We weren’t joking – are you interested in buying The ‘Ville Voice? [The ‘Ville Voice]

It’s official: Bardstown is still one of the worst places on earth, probably. Thank goodness for bourbon. The mayor of Bardstown has fired the assistant chief of the Bardstown Police Department after he was allegedly caught shredding documents belonging to the City of Bardstown, according to official documents. [WDRB]

How will Scott Jennings continue trying to spin this Jim Ramsey-UofL mess? Maybe he’ll just sue everybody who mentions his lucrative contract to spin on behalf of the UofL Foundation. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ugh, who let Claudia Catfish back on the teevee? Less than 24 hours after a Valley Station family shared how it fell victim to a rental scam on CraigsList, WHAS 11 viewers stepped in to help the family raise the money it needed to avoid being forced out on the street. [WHAS11]

A Lexington council woman says she will meet with Lexington fire officials and planning staff to determine what can be done to protect homes and help firefighters in neighborhoods where homes are close together. Since September 2015, at least three fires have occurred in neighborhoods where the distance between homes was less than 10 feet. [H-L]

Crews broke ground Wednesday in Hardin County for a pipeline that will connect one of its water districts to Louisville’s water infrastructure. [WLKY]

Donald Trump would respect limits on his authority if he’s elected president, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) said Monday. [HuffPo]

In case you were wondering? Matt Bevin is dumber than anything the corrupt former governor could cough up. [WAVE3]

Police do not need a warrant to obtain a person’s cellphone location data held by wireless carriers, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Tuesday, dealing a setback to privacy advocates. [Reuters]

Once again, Louisville — a city that prides itself on its park system — has landed near the bottom of a ranking of parks. Probably because the city’s cheerleader electeds consistently ignore reality and focus on hype. [WFPL]

Donald Trump claims a net worth of more than $10 billion and an income of $557 million. But he appears to get there only by overvaluing properties and ignoring his expenses. [Politico]

Cities and businesses in Kentucky have made improvements in including the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender community — but there’s still a ways to go. [Business First]

For 10 weeks, viewers of A&E’s “60 Days In” saw the ins and outs, the good and the bad of the Clark County jail. The show also opened a conversation about the state corrections across the country. Every week, the News and Tribune hosted a panel with local experts to dig into the stories behind the show. Below are the top 5 takeaways from season one and from those weekly conversations. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City With A Bullet

The mother of two sons killed Sunday in the Shawnee neighborhood told WDRB the man who killed them preyed on them and was hoping to recruit them in his gang. [WDRB]

A lack of front door intercoms, a door propped open, overgrown shrubbery – these are some of the most common security vulnerabilities in schools, according to a Saturday panel about school safety during the National Rifle Association’s annual meeting in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

A judge has ended a restraining order that barred the city of Louisville from removing a 120-year-old monument to Confederate soldiers that sits near the University of Louisville. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s state universities are grappling with nearly a decade of budget cuts, about $170 million in all. Over the next two years, they’ll have to cut another 4.5 percent. As the schools prepare their biennial budgets, which have to be ready in June, they are announcing exactly how they will address deficits caused by decreased state support and increased costs for pensions and health care. Nationally, Kentucky is losing ground against other states, which are starting to reinvest in higher education. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Are we still pretending that other law enforcement officers there don’t know what happened? Okay. [WLKY]

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) and officials in 10 additional states have filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration after it told schools and colleges to allow transgender students to use the bathroom that matches their gender identity to comply with existing civil rights laws. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Urban League, located at 1535 West Broadway, hosted a community conversation Tuesday night [WAVE3]

If you’re wondering about what’s going on in Frankfort? Let’s just say it’s a hot mess of a sex scandal involving legislators and law enforcement officers. [Page One]

A Louisville Catholic school will be the site of a new air pollution experiment, as researchers at the University of Louisville study whether trees and greenery can reduce pollution from a nearby roadway. [WFPL]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

Louisville Central Community Centers Inc. has named Kevin Fields Sr. president and chief operating officer. [Business First]

After reviewing some of the issues at each of the three campuses, some of the details of the demographic study and a survey to rank school needs, Doug Reiter chimed in with what he and others think it’ll take for West Clark Community Schools to get residents to vote in favor of the referendum. [News & Tribune]

Getting Extra-Compassionate In Time For Derby

What’s new? Another day, another murder here in Compassionate City. [WDRB]

Holly Liter spends many weekends cleaning up vomit, picking up trash and explaining to her 11-year-old daughter what marijuana smells like. “It can be a nightmare,” she said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city is definitely experiencing deja vu with the jail again. [WHAS11]

Kentucky’s public universities and colleges will be limited to tuition increases that range between 4.6 percent and 6.1 percent next school year for in-state undergraduate students, the Council on Postsecondary Education decided Tuesday. [H-L]

Residents in the Smoketown neighborhood have won a victory after the Metro Sewer District approved changes to a storm water storage basin after outcry from the community. [WLKY]

How the military is preparing for the possibility of a very different kind of Commander in Chief. [HuffPo]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer made it official on Tuesday, throwing his support behind Hillary Clinton for president in advance of the May 17 Kentucky Democratic primary. [WAVE3]

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Sellus Wilder said he wants to run as a “progressive” candidate in a state where he believes Democrats run races like Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

Ann Morrison first noticed a change in her hearing three years ago. The 73-year-old who lives in Goshen, Ky., said she began missing parts of important conversations, turning up the television volume and growing increasingly frustrated. [WFPL]

Ten months ago, three teenaged boys who had escaped from a group home in Brooklyn were arrested for the violent assault and rape of a woman in Manhattan. The boys had been placed in the home as part of a program run by New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, which had been seeking alternatives to formal detention facilities for troubled youngsters caught up in the juvenile justice system. [ProPublica]

The Young Professionals Association of Louisville has announced its new board of directors and officers for 2016-17. [Business First]

Heidi Cruz, wife of Republican presidential candidate and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped in Jeffersonville to talk to the local GOP at Kye’s II on Friday afternoon. [News & Tribune]