MSD Monster Grows, No One Notices

A Kentucky company has been dumping toxic waste into public waters for over a year and the leaders of Bullitt Utilities say the company can’t afford to fix this problem. [WDRB]

This sounds like a disaster in the making. Louisville officials are creating another level of bureaucracy, of sorts, with the promise that it can help save tens of millions of dollars and slow rate increases for city water and sewer customers. [C-J/AKN]

The city of Hillview, Ky. filed for bankruptcy protection, Chapter Nine, on Aug. 20. [WHAS11]

The state is looking for volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care in 35 counties. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! To date, dozens of people have been killed on the streets of Louisville, and many of the victims are under the age of 25. [WLKY]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. Maybe Rand Paul will receive it as a transplant. [HuffPo]

An increase in property assessments means Jefferson County Public Schools will not ask for a tax rate increase for the 2015-2016 school year. [WAVE3]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

Why is there such a large gap between the number of Kentucky students who graduate high school on time and those who go straight to college? [WFPL]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

Mayor Greg Fischer says he’s “very bullish” on Louisville as a spot to possibly expand Major League Soccer, and Wayne Estopinal, Louisville City FC’s operating manager, plans to meet with Fischer next week to discuss his team’s current situation and start talks on building a stadium specifically for soccer. [Business First]

Floyd County may soon have only one recycling site for residents to drop-off items. The Floyd County Council voted 4-3 against giving solid waste $70,000 in additional appropriations, which Operations Manager Mary Lou Byerley said would keep all sites open through the end of the year. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

At Least Louisville Has Fine Bourbon

Louisville is obsessed with killing its people. Everything is puppies and rainbows, though. [WDRB]

The University of Louisville has been named one of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the South by Campus Pride Index. [C-J/AKN]

This weekend marked the annual Newburg Community Days. For more than 50 years, the Newburg community began a tradition of a homecoming weekend in August to celebrate unity, pride and welcome back former residents. [WHAS11]

Everybody freaked out about the minimum wage again this weekend. [H-L]

At least he wasn’t shot? Metro police are investigating after a man was stabbed Sunday night. It occurred in the 1800 block of Frankfort Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood. [WLKY]

A St. Louis County policeman who boasted of how he spent his “annual Michael Brown bonus” has prompted an investigation by the department. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Possibility City doesn’t take public transportation seriously. [WAVE3]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

Responding to backlash over his leadership changes at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says he will appoint Prospect cattle breeder Jack Ragsdale as chairman emeritus of the committee he led for 41 years. [WFPL]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

Bourbon Women, a Louisville-based women’s group that’s focused on bourbon culture, will host its second annual “sip-osium” Friday, Aug. 21, through Sunday, Aug. 23. [Business First]

A representative for the recently formed Clarksville GOP filed a complaint Thursday regarding event permit requirements not being enforced by the town’s Planning and Zoning Department. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

The Minimum Wage Meltdown Isn’t Over

Community leaders began searching for information Wednesday night regarding who was responsible in the hit and run death of Deniesha Pugh. [WDRB]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Agencies, hospitals and schools across Kentuckiana that serve children with special needs were notified by the WHAS Crusade for Children this week that their grant requests will be funded from the money collected during the 62nd annual WHAS Crusade for Children. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate heard arguments Wednesday in an instant-racing lawsuit on a motion by the Family Foundation to have an in-court demonstration of the electronic games based on past horse races. [H-L]

Bourbon lovers can get their hands on a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle without having to wait for hours as Liquor Barn celebrates the grand opening of two new locations. [WLKY]

U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. The numbers reflect a job market moving close to full health and raise expectations that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates as early as September. [HuffPo]

Thousands of workers will receive a 50-cent increase in their hourly pay Wednesday as Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance goes into effect, even as a lawsuit against the city continues. [WAVE3]

Senator Mitch McConnell is standing by his call to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol Rotunda. [More WDRB]

The first phase of Louisville’s minimum wage increase went into effect Wednesday. [WFPL]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Compassionate Murder In Fischer’s Transparent City

MetroSafe dispatchers have confirmed that homicide detectives are investigating after a man’s body was found on the ground in the west end. [WDRB]

Activists said Sunday that the police shooting of a black man in Old Louisville a day earlier illustrates their claim that officers too often use excessive force to subdue people of color, and they said they hope it leads to police measures to increase transparency. [C-J/AKN]

Owning a home doesn’t come cheap and costs of maintenance and repairs to both inside as well as outside can add up. For the elderly and disabled, paying for the costs isn’t always easy. [WHAS11]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [H-L]

A Kentucky company that’s a top maker of whiskey and other spirits is buying a southern Indiana lumber mill that will turn out wooden segments for its bourbon barrels. Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman Corp. will spend $12 million to buy and expand that Owen County mill. [WLKY]

Any city struggling to house its residents should look no further than Houston for a few pointers. [HuffPo]

While facts began to surface about Saturday’s officer-involved shooting, local activists came together Sunday to discuss the fatal event. Their main concern is that they say the officer used unnecessary force. [WAVE3]

A group led by anti-gay pastor Rick Scarborough is vowing to defy any ruling by the Supreme Court that recognizes same-sex marriage. Louisville’s Six Flags Over Jesus is part of the group. [ThinkProgress]

A dramatic decline in Kentuckians earning GED diplomas over the last two years has led some lawmakers to question the current version of the test, which rolled out in January of 2014. [WFPL]

Workers are putting the finishing touches on rows of barracks in a 50-acre camp here, the largest immigration detention center in the country. It houses thousands of women and their children who were caught crossing the border illegally and are seeking asylum in the United States. [NY Times]

Nature’s Methane, an Indiana-based biofuel company, has plans to build not one but two biofuel facilities in west Louisville. [Business First]

The Louisville Metro Corrections officer who was charged with driving drunk along Spring Street and almost striking a patrol car before crashing through the Jeffersonville Overlook last year was sentenced to one year probation with a hefty price tag. [News & Tribune]

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]

Why Is Bullitt County Still So Awful?

Kentucky State Police are now investigating the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.Shelter employee Delsie Williams says Kentucky State Police came to her Mt. Washington home on Monday afternoon with a search warrant. She says they took her cell phone, hard drive, laptops, desktop computers and other items. Her attorney tells WDRB he’s still trying to figure out the reason. [WDRB]

The city’s codes and regulations department hit Louisville metro government with a “public nuisance” violation for a piece of property it owns. In a Jan. 23 notice, a city inspector found the historic Colonial Garden sites in south Louisville had “several rotten structural beams” and that “all exterior surfaces need to be put into good repair.” [C-J/AKN]

A fundraiser will take place Wednesday at Spinelli’s Pizzeria in Downtown Louisville for an employee who was stabbed while delivering pizza to Norton Hospital. [WHAS11]

Kentucky has taken steps to prohibit electioneering on public property within 100 feet of polling places for the May 19 primary election. [H-L]

Visitation will be held Thursday for U.S. District Judge John Heyburn. [WLKY]

Food stamp recipients are more likely to be obese than the general population, according to new research from the federal government. [HuffPo]

The childhood home of Muhammad Ali will be restored, it’s new owner promises. George Bochetto, an attorney from Philadelphia, has bought half of the home and now shares ownership with real estate investor, Jared Weiss, of Las Vegas. [WAVE3]

Last year’s bid to undo Obama’s immigration actions deemed a failure, time to move on to other priorities. [Politico]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is seeking residents’ input on the shaping of the district’s five-year strategic plan. [WFPL]

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds. High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. [NPR]

Back in September, Sweden-based AB Electrolux announced plans to acquire GE Appliances, a Louisville-based division of General Electric Co., for $3.3 billion. At the time, officials with both companies speculated that the transaction would close in 2015, after making its way through the regulatory process. [Business First]

With eyes on the six months ahead, Mayor Mike Moore and City Councilman Dennis Julius are poised to battle for the mayor’s seat in November. [News & Tribune]