It’s Oaks Day So You’re Already Tanked

Here’s your weekly oh snap moment… WAVE 3 anchor Dawne Gee has filed a lawsuit against Baptist Health Louisville over alleged “negligent” treatment she received last May. [WDRB]

If GLI supports the JCPS shakeup, you can bet it’s an absolute disaster. [C-J/AKN]

The post-position draw happened at Churchill Downs on April 29. The Kentucky Derby will happen on May 2. [WHAS11]

Get a glimpse backside as Kentucky Derby contenders work out and clean up. [H-L]

The body of a man missing since February has been found in a truck along Southern Parkway. [WLKY]

Feds pay for drug fraud: 92 percent of foster care, poor kids prescribed antipsychotics get them for unaccepted uses. [HuffPo]

During any other week twenty flights would make a busy day for Atlantic Aviation. However, the Thursday through Saturday of Derby week redefines wingtip-to wingtip. [WAVE3]

For a moment last year, it looked as if the Obama administration was moving toward a history-making end to the federal death penalty. [NY Times]

The Louisville Metro Council, Mayor Greg Fischer and MSD officials announced a plan this week for possibly creating a home buyout program for houses in the area that have been consistently flooded-out during the past several years. Right now, there are a slew of homeowners in flood-prone areas with flood damage they can’t repair even though they have flood insurance. [WFPL]

Looks like Jerry Abramson’s been meddling in Vermont and it didn’t go so swell. [Rutland Herald & VPR]

The University of Louisville’s entrepreneurial ecosystem just got a boost in funding and status. U of L has received a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to commercialize research. [Business First]

As Scott County enters its second month of emergency health provisions, its HIV outbreak is sounding alarms across the country for areas at risk of a similar epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]

We Love “Deb” Lots And You Should, Too

Could tobacco help prevent the transmission of HIV? Researchers from the University of Louisville are leading an international effort to find out. [WDRB]

House Democrats’ top priority in January could be allowing local governments to temporarily raise taxes to help pay for construction projects, House Speaker Greg Stumbo said last week. [C-J/AKN]

Congressman John Yarmuth wants to put pressure on Congress to raise the federal minimum wage. [WHAS11]

With a spate of botched executions across the country this year looming over their discussion, Kentucky lawmakers are revisiting some fundamental questions about the death penalty, including whether the state should keep it on the books. [H-L]

It’s borderline shameful that the teevee folks don’t see fit to identify the ridiculous judge in this scandalous immigration/modern day slavery story. [WLKY]

Want to read the most scandalous Louisville Metro Animal Services story yet? Have at it. The worst in eight years of our LMAS coverage. Everyone from Greg Fischer on down are to blame and should be prosecuted. [The ‘Ville Voice]

An arrest made by the U.S. Marshals Task Force Monday afternoon may not be related to a recent string of fast food robberies despite earlier indications. [WAVE3]

Here’s a peek at someone involved in the next LMAS scandal. [Ruh Ro]

Jennifer “Deb” Carpenter is pretty dang cool and Louisville should be proud of her. Also, DEXTER! [WFPL]

No one on the Supreme Court objected publicly when the justices voted to let Arizona proceed with the execution of Joseph Wood, who unsuccessfully sought information about the drugs that would be used to kill him. [HuffPo]

Just as Yum! Brands Inc. was seeing a rebound in China sales, the most recent meat supply scandal is having a “significant, negative impact” on the company’s performance in the Asian nation. [Business First]

The Indiana Department of Transportation gave the Clark County Commissioners a pleasant surprise last week. [News & Tribune]

The Water Company Costs You Even More $$$

The water in New Albany is back to normal, following a small ink spill that turned a creek blue. [WDRB]

U.S. Census Bureau data show cycling to work is more popular with those in lower-income households than with the wealthy. A larger percentage of Hispanics and multiracial Americans bike to work than do whites and African Americans, data show. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer said his plan to keep children engaged this summer and out of trouble seems to be working. [WHAS11]

The United States is not wealthy enough to throw open its doors to everyone, Dan M. Rose explained Saturday as he marched past a “Deport Illegals” banner on the Alumni Road overpass on New Circle Road in Lexington. [H-L]

A former commonwealth’s attorney is expressing concern about having to testify at the trial of an accused killer. [WLKY]

The U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom was seen at a London celebrity hotspot, complete with armed bodyguards. [Daily Mail]

With less than a month to the start of a new school year, a last minute push to register students by the Jefferson County Public Schools is ramping up throughout the city. [WAVE3]

Authorities say a man has died after being thrown from a boat into the Ohio River near New Albany Sunday. [WLEX18]

The Kentucky Labor Cabinet has cited Louisville Water Co. for violating trench-safety laws for the third time in four years, this time issuing a $84,000 fine for what the state agency called a “willful” disregard of the law. [WFPL]

Kentucky has lax restrictions on domestic abusers’ gun ownership—and the nation’s highest rate of fatal gun violence between partners. [Mother Jones]

Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari has something big in store for fans, but officials with the Santa Claus, Ind. theme park aren’t quite ready to say what. [Business First]

The large metal recycling bins supplied by the county for residents of its unincorporated areas are on borrowed time. [News & Tribune]

Please Support Dare To Care If You Can Afford It

You can’t even drive on Louisville streets these days without your vehicle getting sucked into a giant hole. [WDRB]

Ford Motor Co. says it will hire more than 11,000 people in the U.S. and Asia next year to support an aggressive rollout of new vehicles. [C-J/AKN]

As school safety in this country is re-examined, tonight we take a look at how Kentucky funds safety programs for schools. [WHAS11]

The future of everything according to Ford. Sheryl Connelly is something like a walking TED talk (and indeed, she recently gave one). As Ford’s in-house futurist, it’s her job to keep her eye on the big picture–to examine trends, to think flexibly, and to imagine possibilities as much as decades away. [Fast Company]

More than 600,000 Kentuckians are getting by with the help of food banks and the holiday season can be even harder. [WLKY]

For all of you who don’t have a Jennifer Lawrence Google alert set up already, we give you a roundup of her most lovable moments of the past year. [HuffPo]

The body of a person who had been reported missing by family members was discovered in a wooded area Friday afternoon. [WAVE3]

The welfare queen, she has risen. Spawned by Ronald Reagan to turn blue-collar whites against the Democratic Party, then buried by Bill Clinton with a law “ending welfare as we know it,” she’s been excavated under the first African-American president as Republicans inveigh against the costs of health insurance and food stamps for the poor. [National Journal]

A new poll found that on the eve of the first anniversary of last year’s elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn., support for stricter gun-control laws has dropped to its lowest level since the tragedy. [TPM]

The Kentucky Governor’s Mansion will reach an historic milestone next month, turning 100 years old on Jan. 20. The anniversary will be marked with a yearlong celebration of events honoring the Mansion’s architectural, social and political history. [Press Release]

Adam Edelen’s recent audit of Kentucky Retirement Systems contains a couple hidden gems. [Page One]

Critics of medical marijuana concede that one area of the economy has been boosted by legal weed: Denver’s commercial real estate. [Jim Higdon in Fortune]

Investors [last] week snapped up nearly $728 million in revenue bonds and notes that will help finance the Downtown Crossing of the Louisville-Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges Project. Kentucky then completed the financing plan by closing on a low-cost loan from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). [Press Release]

Barry Bernson’s History Doc Airing On KET

We hear Barry Bernson’s working on a documentary about Kentucky history that’s set to air on KET sometime in 2014. According to him, it’s a one-hour piece, in “Bernson’s Corner” style, that is written, produced and hosted by him. Should be good stuff!

It’s titled “A History of Kentucky in 25 Objects” and production is under way. Award-winning videographer Mark Crowner and Alanna Nash are part of the team.

Thought it’d be a good idea to share this with readers. Especially now that KET content is available through the PBS applications on AppleTV and iOS.

Major Greg Fischer Pee Alert Is Beyond Funny

Shively police say they are searching for a suspect in a shooting outside an apartment complex that left one person dead and another injured. [WDRB]

Three attorneys have been nominated to fill the Jefferson District Court seat vacated when Judge Angela McCormick Bisig was elected to circuit judge last November. [C-J/AKN]

The case against USA Harvest founder, Stan Curtis, will be back in the courts Friday. [WHAS11]

This is the biggest pee alert we’ve ever given – please consider yourself warned. The Kentucky League of Cities named Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer the 2013 elected city official of the year, citing his leadership, innovation and success in building a stronger economy. [Business First]

Sadly, this may be one of the biggest wastes of money we’ve seen in Louisville all year. [WLKY]

Low-income Kentucky families who get federal help with their home heating bills, food for young children or child care could be the first to suffer from the partial shutdown of the U.S. government, officials said Wednesday. [H-L]

Former President Jimmy Carter and singer Christina Aguilera received awards Thursday in Louisville in the name of Muhammad Ali, who sat in the front row to watch. [WAVE3]

An appeals court says the widow of a southern Indiana theme park president isn’t required to sell shares in the facility to her late husband’s brother. [WFPL]

Really, what the heck is going on in Clark County these days? This woman bit her son before getting arrested. [News & Tribune]

It currently has no guaranteed long-term income stream, but the Louisville Metro Affordable Housing Trust Fund is soliciting proposals from developers to tap what resources it does have — primarily a revolving fund for rehabilitating vacant and abandoned property for reuse by low-income people. [C-J/AKN]

A group of Senate Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), railed against Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) at a private luncheon on Wednesday, according to The New York Times, which cited two unnamed people who were present. [HuffPo]

Thank David Jones For Your Fun Tax Increases

How has this loose cannon not been disbarred? The state’s Judicial Conduct Commission ruled former jurist Martin McDonald guilty of Misconduct. [WDRB]

Strange – we thought it was rampant waste, fraud and abuse ruining MSD. Those “flushable” wet wipes, baby wipes, hemorrhoid pads that you send swirling down your toilet bowls are gumming up the works for the Louisville Metropolitan Sewer District — clogging sewer line pumps, screens and other mechanical parts at sewage treatment plants, racking up equipment damage and labor costs. [C-J/AKN]

Police say a stabbing in the 1900 block of Kendall Lane in Shively on Monday night has left one man in the hospital. [WHAS11]

As a marketing venue for Kentucky’s most famous spirit, Bourbon Street is hard to beat — and in July, it’s steamy enough to make any drink look good. [H-L]

Louisville police are on the scene of a fatal shooting at an apartment complex in Pleasure Ridge Park. [WLKY]

Jennifer Lawrence sat down with Vogue to discuss paparazzi and the super “weird” past that made her the lovable star she is today. It turns out America’s dream best friend had a pretty “unhappy” childhood. [HuffPo]

A year after two motorcyclists were injured in a hit-and-run accident police have yet to make an arrest, but the woman who was the passenger in the vehicle that allegedly caused the accident has filed a lawsuit. [WAVE3]

Angry taxpayers spoke, and the Jefferson County school board listened — sort of. After a contentious, standing-room only meeting Monday night, board members for Jefferson County Public Schools turned down the district’s request to raise property tax rates 3.1 percent — then minutes later approved a smaller 1.4 percent hike that will generate roughly $8 million more for public schools. [Toni Konz]

Yum! Brands Inc. again reported weaker same-store sales for restaurants in China as many consumers there remain hesitant to eat chicken due to an Avian flu outbreak. [Business First]

The Jefferson County Board of Education has approved its sixth straight annual tax increase—but it’s a smaller hike than the JCPS staff’s 3.1-percent increase recommendation. [WFPL]

For five months one of the three bridges that cross the Ohio River from Southern Indiana to Louisville was closed. [News & Tribune]