David Tandy-Dan Johnson Slap Fight!

Police body cameras, smoother roads with more bike lanes and affordable housing. Those are just some of the big ticket items Louisville’s mayor is asking Metro Council to approve. [WDRB]

SLAP FIGHT! Louisville Metro Councilman Dan Johnson claims Council President David Tandy physically threatened him in a private telephone conversation this week and that he may file a criminal complaint. [C-J/AKN]

Boarded up homes and vacant and abandoned properties are problem in many Louisville neighborhoods. [WHAS11]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

The school year is almost over, but some elementary students are already getting help preparing for next year. What the hell kind of opener is that? [WLKY]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

As victims recover from a devastating apartment fire in southern Indiana, there are new problems. Time Warner Cable tried to collect lost equipment fees from at least two of its customers who lost everything when the Bridgepoint Apartments caught fire in April. [WAVE3]

Looks like some folks discovered the UPS hub again. [Gizmodo]

The Obama administration announced new clean water rules today that it says will protect sources of drinking water for 117 million Americans, rules welcomed by environmental groups, but bitterly opposed by congressional Republicans and farm state democrats. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

KFC Corp.’s rebranding and revival of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Col. Harland Sanders has garnered mixed reviews. [Business First]

A former New Albany Police officer was formally terminated Thursday evening by the department’s Merit Commission on four of five charges of improper conduct. Laura Schook — who made claims in 2008 and 2010 to the merit commission of some officers filing inaccurate time sheets, corruption within the department and by not receiving proper backup on calls — was terminated by a 4-1 vote of the commission. [News & Tribune]

Morning Bourbon & Needle Fun Stuff

A death investigation began shortly after a body was found in the Ohio River Tuesday morning. [WDRB]

The relocation of hundreds of government employees out of decaying office space is beginning, with the entire move expected to be completed by mid-fall. [C-J/AKN]

Eight authors who have written books about bourbon are scheduled to open a days-long event giving participants a behind-the-scenes look at Kentucky’s bourbon industry. [WHAS11]

Of course Hal Rogers opposes needle exchanges. Until his family members figure out how to profit from them, they won’t get his support. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year. [WLKY]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Two local TV station employees suffered minor injuries as a car ran a light and slammed into their live truck, flipping it onto its side. [WAVE3]

Charter Communications announced early Tuesday that it will acquire Time Warner Cable — a little over a month after a proposed deal between Comcast and Time Warner was killed by regulators. [The Hill]

The appeals period for the latest round of Louisville property tax assessments closes at the end of this month. Some appeals will be successful, but others will not. [WFPL]

Senate Republican leaders managed to scrape up enough votes just past midnight Saturday morning to put off decisive action on the NSA’s bulk collection of American phone records until next Sunday, May 31. But the hardliners — and make no mistake, they are taking an even harder and more absurd line than the NSA itself — have no endgame. [The Intercept]

Louisville leaders are encouraging foreign-born residents of Louisville to call their friends and family and tell them how much they enjoy living here. [Business First]

A Southern Indiana county at the epicenter of the worst HIV outbreak in Indiana history is seeking state permission to implement a yearlong needle exchange program. [News & Tribune]

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]

Of Course They’re Going To Dig Up Those Trees

The Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission this week issued the reprimand to Jefferson District Court Judge Sandra McLaughlin for comments that were “unnecessary, undignified and inconsistent with the presumption of innocence,” according to the Dec. 29 order. [WDRB]

A federal judge in Michigan has dismissed a suit filed last summer by Ford Motor Co. hourly employees, several working at the Louisville Assembly Plant, who alleged that the International United Auto Workers had breached a duty of fair representation. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Police are investigating in the Parkland Neighborhood after a man’s body was found inside a home Tuesday. [WHAS11]

Time Warner Cable holds the bottom two spots in the latest list of companies on the American Customer Satisfaction Index. [H-L]

The coroner has identified a man killed Tuesday in a shooting in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

While few people say they’ve completely recovered from the recession, many are beginning to notice a change. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials plan to dig up trees they say someone mistakenly planted along Brownsboro Road, ending a controversy that will cost taxpayers thousands of dollars. [WAVE3]

Los Angeles gave America the modern street gang. Groups like the Crips and MS-13 have spread from coast to coast, and even abroad. But on Southern California’s streets they have been vanishing. Has L.A. figured out how to stop the epidemic it set loose on the world? [Pacific Standard]

Even before police practices came under national scrutiny, Louisville Metro Police leaders were exploring a new technology that police critics and advocates alike say would improve relations between officers and the public. Body cameras have been under consideration in LMPD for nearly two years, police officials said. [WFPL]

The number of Americans filing new claims for jobless benefits rose more than expected last week, but the trend remained consistent with sustained strength in the labor market. [Reuters]

In recent years, Louisville Water Co. officials have started thinking regionally as a means to take advantage of the company’s vast Ohio River water supply and make money to offset reductions in everyday water usage. [Business First]

The same commission that New Albany Police Officer Laura Schook petitioned in May for help voted unanimously Monday to fire the 20-year veteran of the department for improper conduct. [News & Tribune]

Here’s A Good Morning You-Know-What Sandwich

An LG&E natural gas pipeline that ruptured in Oldham County in September caused $1.3 million in property damage and other costs, according to the utility’s report to federal safety regulators. [WDRB]

Attorney General Jack Conway appointed another special prosecutor to handle the ongoing dispute over whether Louisville Metro Councilman David James is serving in two incompatible public positions. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Louisville Metro Police are working a fatal shooting on 2100 block of Ratcliffe Avenue just west Dixie Highway. [WHAS11]

Sales of spirits are accelerating into the festive season, according to Brown-Forman. The Louisville-based parent of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Woodford Reserve reported that sales for the second quarter were up 5 percent to nearly $1.14 billion. For the first half of the financial year net sales are up 4 percent, the company said. [H-L]

We’re blown away that wingnuts aren’t screaming satanism or whatever. Good Morning Dragons is a yoga program at South Oldham Middle School that has kids bending and twisting into yoga poses before the first bell. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali on Saturday posted a selfie on his Instagram to cheer on Louisville against Kentucky in college football. “#Louisville Game Day! Go Cards!” the caption read. [HuffPo]

This is why Clark County can’t have nice things. She makes decisions that affect thousands of students, but several months ago she made a decision that landed her in jail. Despite admitting to felony theft, Teresa Perkins took her seat on the Greater Clark County School Board Tuesday night and she says she’s not resigning. [WAVE3]

Did UPS discriminate against a pregnant worker by letting her go? Women’s reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups. [NPR]

James McGaugh is the recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for psychology, the University of Louisville announced Tuesday evening. [WFPL]

A growing number of cable companies are implementing data caps (sorry — “data thresholds”), which put limits on how much data a subscriber could use before facing penalties ranging from warning messages to throttled speeds to overage fees. A new report from the federal Government Accountability Office says that lack of competition in the broadband market could result in these caps being implemented with no one benefiting other than cable companies’ bottom lines. [Consumerist]

Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) recently began cranking out its new aluminum body F-150 trucks. Since then, there’s been plenty of speculation about whether the new body would be carried over to other vehicles, including the F-Series Super Duty Trucks made in Louisville. [Business First]

Another fun scandal is brewing at the University of Louisville. The VP of Human Resources was canned and escorted away by cops. [The ‘Ville Voice]

The legal bills of a Jeffersonville resident who sued MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. and the city of Jeffersonville over a neighboring asphalt plant have been paid by a laborers’ union. [News & Tribune]

Council Democrats Apparently Lack All Courage

From the Department of Things That Make This Possibility City… A fire run to a Louisville residence led to the arrest of two people after police say firefighters found something illegal inside the home. [WDRB]

In a dozen years representing the Louisville Metro Council’s 5th District centered in the Shawnee and Portland, Democrat Cheri Bryant Hamilton says she has spent significant effort “planting seeds” in trying to improve the district’s quality of life. [C-J/AKN]

Police were on the scene at Valley High School after officials said they received a threat Monday morning. [WHAS11]

It’s a shame no one in Louisville has the guts to stand up. You want to know why people like Vicki Aubrey Welch and Jim King don’t stand up? Because cable lobbyists have been on them like white on rice in a coordinated lobbying campaign focused on Louisville, Lexington and Northern Kentucky. Bravo to Mayor Jim Gray and a unanimous Urban County Council for taking on Time Warner Cable. It’s about time somebody stood up to the giant cable television and Internet companies and their frustrating game of monopoly. [H-L]

The sister of a central Indiana man who has challenged rulings that his death last year was a suicide says she’s sent documents about the investigation to 500 community leaders. [WLKY]

The Vincennes New Years Eve Ball is a tradition for parents and students of Vincennes Lincoln High School. [HuffPo]

Donations poured in when a homeless family struggled to cover expenses for a child killed in Cherokee Park. [WAVE3]

KFC’s parent company, Yum! Brands, has teamed up with Singapore-listed Yoma Strategic Holdings to bring the franchise to Myanmar, also known as Burma. [BBC]

Why a JCPS parent didn’t let her son take Kentucky’s standardized tests. [WFPL]

Grimes’s refusal to say who she voted for is emblematic of her entire campaign, which, for the last 15 months, has been waged in a defensive crouch—evading and obfuscating at every turn. [TNR]

Companies that usually compete for business have partnered together for a common cause. [Business First]

Brian Meyer was unanimously selected by the Clark County Democrats to succeed Danny Rodden as sheriff in their caucus Saturday morning, but not without some resistance. [News & Tribune]

Council Is About To Take Greg Fischer To Task

And people still wonder why we cover the intricacies of smaller school districts. It’s because that’s where we’ve shown for years the focus should be. [WDRB]

Can we please start taking youth homelessness more seriously in Louisville and in Kentucky? [C-J/AKN]

During a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Louisville Metro Police released new details after a woman was found locked inside the trunk of her daughter’s car. [WHAS11]

A Woodford County High School student is at odds with administrators who put her into an alternative school and stripped her of her position as senior class president after she purchased from a classmate a pill that treats attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a suit filed in U.S. District Court in Lexington. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police said a 12-year-old boy found dead in Cherokee Park on Tuesday afternoon was killed. [WLKY]

After years of listening to Wayne LaPierre croon away about how “only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun,” we finally have some real data to test whether this rationale for arming civilians (and selling more guns) is really true. [HuffPo]

Kentucky has one of the highest rates of homeless children in the county. [WAVE3]

Turns out Louisville’s Metro Council DOES have subpoena power and can force Greg Fischer to turn over documents and hand over staffers to testify. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Student Timothy Tungate was on the third floor of Fern Creek High School on Tuesday afternoon when he heard gunshots ring out. [WFPL]

The Comcast/Time Warner Cable merger vote was delayed after New York regulators found deficiencies. NY’s consumer protection agency pointed to the companies’ substandard customer service. [Ars Technica]

The world wouldn’t have bourbon without Kentucky. [Business First]

New Albany will maintain zoning control over the two-mile fringe area between the city and Floyd County, the Indiana Supreme Court decided. [News & Tribune]