Derby’s Over, Are You Still Woah Hung Over? Only 50 Weeks Until The City Looks Clean Again!

Louisville Metro Police say officers responded to the scene of a fatal shooting. [WDRB]

The Kentucky Derby isn’t what it used to be, at least as far as producing mayhem is concerned. Police said they made only 14 arrests in and around Churchill Downs Saturday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Nyquist stormed into the lead on the turn for home and won the Kentucky Derby to become just the eighth undefeated horse to win the Run for the Roses. [WHAS11]

Humana Inc. (HUM) on Wednesday reported first-quarter profit of $234 million. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman in her mid to late 20s was shot and killed Sunday morning, according to police. [WLKY]

Picture it – fish herpes in the Ohio River! [HuffPo]

Saturday’s crowd of 167,227 at Churchill Downs was the second-largest in Derby history. [WAVE3]

Tribune Publishing on Friday released a slate of talking points aimed at supporting its decision to rebuff Gannett’s recent $815 million offer to buy the company. The statement, labeled “Setting the Record Straight,” lists seven “myths” about Gannett’s recent bid and offers a series of brief rebuttals stating its case. [Poynter]

Every year at the Kentucky Derby, crazy hat-wearing, mint julep-guzzling horse-gazers break into a passionate rendition of Kentucky’s state song, “My Old Kentucky Home.” As tradition goes, the University of Louisville Cardinal Marching Band accompanies the crowd as they croon a ballad that seems to be about people who miss their happy home. “The sun shines bright on my old Kentucky home/’Tis summer and the people are gay” begins one version. [WFPL]

A majority of the five-member U.S. Federal Communications Commission has voted to approve Charter Communications Inc’s (CHTR.O) acquisitions of Time Warner Cable Inc (TWC.N) and Bright House Networks, two sources briefed on the matter said on Thursday. [Reuters]

ImagineAir said it also might start hiring pilots locally. [Business First]

In the race for the Floyd County Coroner, David Moore and William H. Garner III will face off in November’s general election. [News & Tribune]

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Ting not your thing? Want to be on the AT&T network with unlimited talk and text and cheap data? Join Cricket and you’ll get a $25 referral credit, $50 port-in credit and another $50 if you’re leaving T-Mobile. [Cricket]

Is Anyone Even Working This Week?

Shore Runner was nearing the final furlong, charging down the stretch of Keeneland’s muddy track on a Saturday afternoon last October. Then he took a step that ended his life. [WDRB]

Despite months of customer frustrations that it produced, a new billing system at Louisville Water Co. was recognized for a top “implementation” award at an industry gathering in Phoenix this week. [C-J/AKN]

Join Bernie Sanders for a campaign rally in Louisville, Ky. The event happens on Tuesday May, 3 at the Big Four Lawn at 4 p.m. [WHAS11]

In a story April 30 about the upcoming removal of a Confederate monument, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the monument was capped with a statue of Jefferson Davis. The statue is of a Confederate soldier. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Spring Meet at Churchill Downs began with night racing. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama brought the laughs at his last White House Correspondents’ Dinner. [HuffPo]

Stories of murders and shootings have almost become routine in Louisville. In 2015, the Metro area had 84 murders and more than 350 shootings, an average of nearly one per day, tearing lives and communities apart. [WAVE3]

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton has a 4-point lead over rival Bernie Sanders days ahead of Indiana’s primary, within a new poll’s margin of error. [The Hill]

Mayor Greg Fischer and University of Louisville President James Ramsey announced Friday the Confederate statue on U of L’s Belknap campus will be removed. [WFPL]

With Charter Communications set to receive approval for its acquisition of Time Warner Cable (TWC), regulators plan to impose a series of conditions designed to stop anti-competitive and anti-consumer policies pursued by TWC. Conditions proposed by the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission would prohibit the combined company from imposing data caps and overage fees on Internet customers, charging large online content providers for network interconnection, and stifling growth of online video by demanding restrictive clauses in contracts with programmers. [Ars Technica]

In a week in which Churchill Downs Inc. debuted renovations at its namesake Louisville racetrack, announced the return of the Breeders’ Cup to the track in 2018 and unveiled plans for a $25 million hotel and expansion at its Oxford, Maine, casino, the company focused on something else in a conference call with investors today. [Business First]

Drivers on 10th Street may soon notice more activity along either sides of the busy road. [News & Tribune]

Bridge Tolls Are Coming. Freak Out.

Elizabethtown Police are investigating an early morning homicide. [WDRB]

A coalition of transportation advocates is pressuring the city to be more transparent about its application for a $50 million award to revolutionize roadways. [C-J/AKN]

The scene of a crash on Watterson Trail between Stone Bluff Road and Hurstbourne Parkway involving a JCPS school bus, #0853, has cleared. [WHAS11]

Food prices in Kentucky fell by 7.5 percent last year, according to the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s quarterly Marketbasket Survey. [H-L]

WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE?! [WLKY]

Donald Trump may be about to do something that has never been done in the modern presidential nominating era: Win a state primary without a single endorsement from a member of Congress. [HuffPo]

Sandra Mae Frank, a young woman from the Bluegrass, is making quite a mark on the Great White Way. [WAVE3]

If FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has his way, most people who subscribe to cable will stop paying a monthly fee to rent a set-top box from their provider. [NPR]

The chief executive of Aetna is optimistic about the future of the company and Louisville following the planned sale of Humana. [WFPL]

Reaction to Gov. Matt Bevin’s first budget proposal was mixed with Republicans approving and Democratic lawmakers asking for more details and expressing concerns. [The Morehead News]

When Kentucky and Indiana transportation officials debuted the new RiverLink brudge tolling system in November, they promised there would be plenty of discussion ahead on how the tolling system works. The system is a financing mechanism for the Ohio River Bridges Project, which will be completed later this year. [Business First]

An order banning weapons at the Clarksville Municipal Building is back on the table. [News & Tribune]

Breathe. The Air Might Not Kill You.

Former Jefferson County Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Matt Conway was charged with felony assault Wednesday night after allegedly attacking his wife, according to a police report. Remember when his brother was covering up his police investigation(s)? [WDRB]

Everything is so corrupt in West Buechel that they’ve started some kind of watchdog organization. [C-J/AKN]

Just what Louisville needs – another stadium/arena. [WHAS11]

The red steel shipping container was once used to transport toothbrushes and bras. By May, it and another container will be transformed into a one bedroom, one-bathroom, 640-square-foot home that will be part of a new live-work community on York Street spearheaded by the North Limestone Community Development Corp. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A team of physicians, surgeons and nurses are creating an advanced heart failure program at Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WLKY]

When Donald Trump first watched his new TV ad that began airing this week, he said, “Play it again. I love the feel of it.” I, too, had to play it again, not because I too loved the feel, but out of amazement that this is what the front runner for the Republican nomination had chosen to put in his first TV ad of the campaign. [HuffPo]

A man is charged with wanton endangerment after setting himself on fire in the parking lot of a busy downtown convenience store. Maybe instead of jailing this man, Possumbilly City could get him some help? [WAVE3]

The FBI now tracks animal abuse like it tracks homicides. It was more than 10 years ago that Mary Lou Randour realized she couldn’t answer what should have been a simple question: Was cruelty against animals on the rise or in decline? [WaPo]

About a dozen people filed into a Jeffersontown gun shop shortly after noon on Tuesday, just after President Barack Obama wrapped up a live address outlining details of his executive actions designed to bolster gun control and curb gun violence. [WFPL]

Time Warner Cable said late Wednesday that hackers may have stolen up to 320,000 customers’ email passwords. [The Hill]

Craig Richard, the former CEO of Greater Louisville Inc. who left the chamber of commerce in 2014 to become CEO of Invest Atlanta, will resign from his position Jan. 18, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed announced Wednesday. Part of a pattern. These folks leave after screwing up in Louisville and eventually get figured out, forced resignations occur, blah blah blah. [Business First]

Nonprofits looking to do some good for youth in Clark and Floyd counties have a chance to bolster their budgets with grants from the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana. [News & Tribune]

JCPS-LMPD Mess Blown Outta Proportion

Time Warner constantly sucks and constantly gets to take more of your money with little to no competition. [WDRB]

PEE ALERT! Louisville has a top-25 basketball team with a high ceiling, but the Cardinals aren’t ranked yet this season because of ongoing investigations into a book making major allegations against the program, coach Rick Pitino said. [C-J/AKN]

Supporters of Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens met with Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine on Monday afternoon, Nov. 30, urging him to withdraw his request to remove Stevens from criminal court cases. [WHAS11]

Before Gov. Steve Beshear leaves office and Gov.-elect Matt Bevin can reconstitute the racing commission, the regulatory body will take up some key business on Tuesday: a request for a gambling parlor at Turfway Park in Florence and Keeneland’s plan to open a quarter horse track and gambling parlor in Corbin. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department chief is reminding Jefferson County Public Schools exactly what officers can and cannot do when it comes to safety and security at schools. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama spoke out on Planned Parenthood following what appears to be a politically motivated shooting at one of the health care provider’s clinics in Colorado last week that left three people dead and nine others injured. [HuffPo]

After more than three months of meetings with local officials and community leaders, Clark County’s health officer, Dr. Kevin Burke, is gearing up to formally petition the state to set up the exchange program. [WAVE3]

One of the most prominent stains on the reputation of the much-mythologized Reagan administration was its response, or lack of response, to the AIDS crisis as it began to ravage American cities in the early and mid-1980s. President Reagan famously (though, not famously enough) didn’t himself publicly mention AIDS until 1985, when more than 5,000 people, most of them gay men, had already been killed by the disease. Filmmaker Scott Calonico’s new documentary short, When AIDS Was Funny, exclusively debuting on VF.com, shows how the Reagan administration reacted to the mounting problem in chilling fashion. Not even Reagan’s appointed mouthpiece, notorious press secretary Larry Speakes, had much to say about the crisis beyond derisive laughter. [Vanity Fair]

The future of Louisville’s bicycling infrastructure will be the topic of discussion at a pair of public meetings set for this week. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday said the United States has power to do more to prevent gun homicides like last week’s shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Hillsdale Furniture LLC has based its distribution operations in Bullitt County since 2008, but those services are returning home. [Business First]

Officials are looking at ways to make the Clark County Government Building more secure. [News & Tribune]

All Kinds Of Compassionate Things Happening

It was almost a year ago when Jefferson County Public Schools officials presented an annual report to the school board about the district’s effort to recruit and hire more minority teachers. [WDRB]

Charter, with the assistance of people like Riggs Lewis, are *this close* to fleecing taxpayers by manipulating your legislative representation. [C-J/AKN]

Family members remember DeShawndre Davis as a charming man who loved to make people laugh. His father said he was at the wrong place at the wrong time when he was shot and killed on Dixie Highway last Sunday. [WHAS11]

Andy Beshear emphasizes that he is his own man, but family ties have been an enormous boon to the Democratic nominee for attorney general. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA! While surrounded by gunshot-wound survivors, community members and relatives, Andrea Davis expressed anger over a shooting during the funeral visitation for his son Deshawndre Davis. [WLKY]

Amid the heroin epidemic, there is little disagreement over the effectiveness of naloxone, the medication that can revive opioid addicts from an overdose. It has come to be seen as an essential tool to combat the skyrocketing number of overdoses. [HuffPo]

Wasn’t that fun, Compassionate City? A vehicle struck several juveniles, sending at least nine to the hospital, early Sunday morning in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Remember the firefighter mess here in Possumbilly City? New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said on Friday the city had agreed to pay $75 million to settle a longstanding dispute with its firefighters over back wages, ending a quarrel in which he was threatened with house arrest. [Reuters]

Louisville Metro Department of Public Health is expanding the city’s syringe exchange program to a second location. [WFPL]

Kentucky, once a near Democratic monopoly, is seeing more voters register Republican and now has a Republican-majority congressional district for the first time since 1999. [Richmond Register]

These have been heady times for those in the domestic whiskey business. Especially for Louisville’s Brown-Forman, the home of Jack Daniel’s, Woodford Reserve, Old Forrester, and so many other notable brown water brands. [Business First]

The residents of Sellersburg chose the same person to be their clerk-treasurer for five straight elections. On Nov. 3, they won’t have that chance. Sellersburg residents will have to choose who will replace the late Dave Kinder. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

David Tandy-Dan Johnson Slap Fight!

Police body cameras, smoother roads with more bike lanes and affordable housing. Those are just some of the big ticket items Louisville’s mayor is asking Metro Council to approve. [WDRB]

SLAP FIGHT! Louisville Metro Councilman Dan Johnson claims Council President David Tandy physically threatened him in a private telephone conversation this week and that he may file a criminal complaint. [C-J/AKN]

Boarded up homes and vacant and abandoned properties are problem in many Louisville neighborhoods. [WHAS11]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

The school year is almost over, but some elementary students are already getting help preparing for next year. What the hell kind of opener is that? [WLKY]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

As victims recover from a devastating apartment fire in southern Indiana, there are new problems. Time Warner Cable tried to collect lost equipment fees from at least two of its customers who lost everything when the Bridgepoint Apartments caught fire in April. [WAVE3]

Looks like some folks discovered the UPS hub again. [Gizmodo]

The Obama administration announced new clean water rules today that it says will protect sources of drinking water for 117 million Americans, rules welcomed by environmental groups, but bitterly opposed by congressional Republicans and farm state democrats. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

KFC Corp.’s rebranding and revival of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Col. Harland Sanders has garnered mixed reviews. [Business First]

A former New Albany Police officer was formally terminated Thursday evening by the department’s Merit Commission on four of five charges of improper conduct. Laura Schook — who made claims in 2008 and 2010 to the merit commission of some officers filing inaccurate time sheets, corruption within the department and by not receiving proper backup on calls — was terminated by a 4-1 vote of the commission. [News & Tribune]

Morning Bourbon & Needle Fun Stuff

A death investigation began shortly after a body was found in the Ohio River Tuesday morning. [WDRB]

The relocation of hundreds of government employees out of decaying office space is beginning, with the entire move expected to be completed by mid-fall. [C-J/AKN]

Eight authors who have written books about bourbon are scheduled to open a days-long event giving participants a behind-the-scenes look at Kentucky’s bourbon industry. [WHAS11]

Of course Hal Rogers opposes needle exchanges. Until his family members figure out how to profit from them, they won’t get his support. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year. [WLKY]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Two local TV station employees suffered minor injuries as a car ran a light and slammed into their live truck, flipping it onto its side. [WAVE3]

Charter Communications announced early Tuesday that it will acquire Time Warner Cable — a little over a month after a proposed deal between Comcast and Time Warner was killed by regulators. [The Hill]

The appeals period for the latest round of Louisville property tax assessments closes at the end of this month. Some appeals will be successful, but others will not. [WFPL]

Senate Republican leaders managed to scrape up enough votes just past midnight Saturday morning to put off decisive action on the NSA’s bulk collection of American phone records until next Sunday, May 31. But the hardliners — and make no mistake, they are taking an even harder and more absurd line than the NSA itself — have no endgame. [The Intercept]

Louisville leaders are encouraging foreign-born residents of Louisville to call their friends and family and tell them how much they enjoy living here. [Business First]

A Southern Indiana county at the epicenter of the worst HIV outbreak in Indiana history is seeking state permission to implement a yearlong needle exchange program. [News & Tribune]

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]