All Kinds Of Compassionate Things Happening

It was almost a year ago when Jefferson County Public Schools officials presented an annual report to the school board about the district’s effort to recruit and hire more minority teachers. [WDRB]

Charter, with the assistance of people like Riggs Lewis, are *this close* to fleecing taxpayers by manipulating your legislative representation. [C-J/AKN]

Family members remember DeShawndre Davis as a charming man who loved to make people laugh. His father said he was at the wrong place at the wrong time when he was shot and killed on Dixie Highway last Sunday. [WHAS11]

Andy Beshear emphasizes that he is his own man, but family ties have been an enormous boon to the Democratic nominee for attorney general. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA! While surrounded by gunshot-wound survivors, community members and relatives, Andrea Davis expressed anger over a shooting during the funeral visitation for his son Deshawndre Davis. [WLKY]

Amid the heroin epidemic, there is little disagreement over the effectiveness of naloxone, the medication that can revive opioid addicts from an overdose. It has come to be seen as an essential tool to combat the skyrocketing number of overdoses. [HuffPo]

Wasn’t that fun, Compassionate City? A vehicle struck several juveniles, sending at least nine to the hospital, early Sunday morning in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Remember the firefighter mess here in Possumbilly City? New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said on Friday the city had agreed to pay $75 million to settle a longstanding dispute with its firefighters over back wages, ending a quarrel in which he was threatened with house arrest. [Reuters]

Louisville Metro Department of Public Health is expanding the city’s syringe exchange program to a second location. [WFPL]

Kentucky, once a near Democratic monopoly, is seeing more voters register Republican and now has a Republican-majority congressional district for the first time since 1999. [Richmond Register]

These have been heady times for those in the domestic whiskey business. Especially for Louisville’s Brown-Forman, the home of Jack Daniel’s, Woodford Reserve, Old Forrester, and so many other notable brown water brands. [Business First]

The residents of Sellersburg chose the same person to be their clerk-treasurer for five straight elections. On Nov. 3, they won’t have that chance. Sellersburg residents will have to choose who will replace the late Dave Kinder. [News & Tribune]

UofL Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves. In Other Words? Told Ya So Years Ago, Nothing Has Changed

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

WHAS11 has learned, through MetroSafe, there is a shooting in the 3800 block of Vermont Avenue, in the Shawnee area. [WHAS11]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Metro police said a 66-year-old man found dead last week was slain. Police said Michael Davis was killed sometime last Monday. [WLKY]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Crowds rallied together Sunday near the corner of 17th and Broadway with concerns of a new biodigester planned for the West Louisville neighborhood that would deal with methane gas. [WAVE3]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan touted two Louisville educational institutions Thursday during a stop in the city. [WFPL]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services is updating and expanding its surgical facilities in a $2.4 million project. [Business First]

Shane Corbin said his role as Jeffersonville Planning and Zoning director has been an exciting one. [News & Tribune]

Maybe Greg Will Give Cordish More $

Guess this is a nice break from all the shootings? LMPD is investigating after at least one person was stabbed near Fourth Street Live! in downtown Louisville. [WDRB]

Philadelphia representatives with the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network visited Louisville on Wednesday as part of an investigation into claims of racial discrimination at the Cordish Co.’s downtown 4th Street Live venue. The group is conducting the fact-finding mission because Cordish is planning to build a casino in Philadelphia, and it is concerned about the project after reading The Courier-Journal’s July 17 story outlining allegations from more than half a dozen former employees who claim that the company uses practices to bar African Americans. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you ever thought Time Warner Cable wasn’t the worst. [WHAS11]

Police in Florida have arrested a Louisville priest who resigned after FBI investigators found child pornography on his computer. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating after a man was fatally shot Saturday night outside of an apartment complex in southwestern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Americans use prescription drugs and they know these medicines help people, but they still don’t care much for pharmaceutical companies and think the industry is too money-hungry, according to a new survey. [HuffPo]

Everything is puppies and rainbows. “What we’re trying to do is break a world record with a Guinness World Record for the most paddlers in a lot. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky GOP’s central committee voted Saturday to adopt a presidential caucus system next year, clearing the way Republican Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and reelection at the same time. [Politico]

The grass is nearly knee-high and litter-covered on the vacant lots at the northeast corner of Wilson Avenue and Dixie Highway. The two shaggy lots aren’t unusual for the Park Hill neighborhood, where nearly 8 percent of properties — more than 340 parcels — are vacant or abandoned, according to a 2014 report from Network Center for Community Change. [WFPL]

The US government is launching a $5m (£3.2m) initiative to combat the use and trafficking of heroin, with a focus on prioritising treatment rather than punishment. [BBC]

Glenmary Country Club, a semiprivate club and golf course located off Bardstown Road south of the Gene Snyder Freeway, closed Wednesday and could remain closed indefinitely as a legal dispute surrounding the property continues. [Business First]

During their first official introduction to the proposal, New Albany City Council members were generally receptive to a request to aid in funding a plan designed to eliminate homelessness in Southern Indiana over the next decade. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

David Tandy-Dan Johnson Slap Fight!

Police body cameras, smoother roads with more bike lanes and affordable housing. Those are just some of the big ticket items Louisville’s mayor is asking Metro Council to approve. [WDRB]

SLAP FIGHT! Louisville Metro Councilman Dan Johnson claims Council President David Tandy physically threatened him in a private telephone conversation this week and that he may file a criminal complaint. [C-J/AKN]

Boarded up homes and vacant and abandoned properties are problem in many Louisville neighborhoods. [WHAS11]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

The school year is almost over, but some elementary students are already getting help preparing for next year. What the hell kind of opener is that? [WLKY]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

As victims recover from a devastating apartment fire in southern Indiana, there are new problems. Time Warner Cable tried to collect lost equipment fees from at least two of its customers who lost everything when the Bridgepoint Apartments caught fire in April. [WAVE3]

Looks like some folks discovered the UPS hub again. [Gizmodo]

The Obama administration announced new clean water rules today that it says will protect sources of drinking water for 117 million Americans, rules welcomed by environmental groups, but bitterly opposed by congressional Republicans and farm state democrats. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

KFC Corp.’s rebranding and revival of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Col. Harland Sanders has garnered mixed reviews. [Business First]

A former New Albany Police officer was formally terminated Thursday evening by the department’s Merit Commission on four of five charges of improper conduct. Laura Schook — who made claims in 2008 and 2010 to the merit commission of some officers filing inaccurate time sheets, corruption within the department and by not receiving proper backup on calls — was terminated by a 4-1 vote of the commission. [News & Tribune]

Morning Bourbon & Needle Fun Stuff

A death investigation began shortly after a body was found in the Ohio River Tuesday morning. [WDRB]

The relocation of hundreds of government employees out of decaying office space is beginning, with the entire move expected to be completed by mid-fall. [C-J/AKN]

Eight authors who have written books about bourbon are scheduled to open a days-long event giving participants a behind-the-scenes look at Kentucky’s bourbon industry. [WHAS11]

Of course Hal Rogers opposes needle exchanges. Until his family members figure out how to profit from them, they won’t get his support. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Louisville Waterfront Fourth of July celebration will return this year. [WLKY]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Two local TV station employees suffered minor injuries as a car ran a light and slammed into their live truck, flipping it onto its side. [WAVE3]

Charter Communications announced early Tuesday that it will acquire Time Warner Cable — a little over a month after a proposed deal between Comcast and Time Warner was killed by regulators. [The Hill]

The appeals period for the latest round of Louisville property tax assessments closes at the end of this month. Some appeals will be successful, but others will not. [WFPL]

Senate Republican leaders managed to scrape up enough votes just past midnight Saturday morning to put off decisive action on the NSA’s bulk collection of American phone records until next Sunday, May 31. But the hardliners — and make no mistake, they are taking an even harder and more absurd line than the NSA itself — have no endgame. [The Intercept]

Louisville leaders are encouraging foreign-born residents of Louisville to call their friends and family and tell them how much they enjoy living here. [Business First]

A Southern Indiana county at the epicenter of the worst HIV outbreak in Indiana history is seeking state permission to implement a yearlong needle exchange program. [News & Tribune]

More Possibility In Chattanooga Than Louisville?

The words don’t always come easy. For Perry Clemons, they sometimes vanish. Clemons is 58-years-old and lives in Clarkson, Kentucky. [WDRB]

As Mayor Greg Fischer joins Metro Council member Angela Lee in calling for a fuller environmental study of the Brownsboro Road site purchased for a new Veterans Affairs Medical Center, plans are in the works to turn about half of the second choice site into a subdivision. [C-J/AKN]

What? Another shooting? Surely not. Not in Possibility City where everything is Compassionate and Transparent. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul takes the first step toward running for president when he asks state party leaders to endorse his idea to create a 2016 presidential caucus in Kentucky. [H-L]Singed by their defeat in the battle over Homeland Security funding, Republicans aren’t about to renew their fight against President Barack Obama’s executive actions on immigration anytime soon. [Politico]

They’ll run stories like this about animal shelters hundreds of miles away. But couldn’t be bothered to dig in at Metro Animal Services at any point over the past decade. [WLKY]

Louisville doesn’t have the guts to do something like this. Fischer and council will always bend over backwards for lobbyists. [HuffPo]

Lexington has started to shoot its kids just like Louisville! Copycat. We were first. Lexington police told media outlets a 9-year-old boy was taken to UK Hospital after being shot while riding in his parents’ car. [WAVE3]

A factory in Louisville, Kentucky, made chewing tobacco for over a century before folding in 2009. Now the abandoned site is a symbol of how the city is changing: The 24-acre brownfield will soon become one of the largest hubs for local food in the U.S. [Fast Company]

Louisville Metro Police is on track to putting body cameras on some officers this summer. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama’s proposal to consolidate more than a dozen regulatory offices into an agency that would oversee food safety is drawing the intrigue and ire of some food safety advocates, producers, and experts — some of whom question the feasibility of a move that’s decades in the making. [ThinkProgress]

A U.S. Supreme Court decision about whether patients who get insurance through federally administered exchanges should have their costs subsidized is not expected to have an impact on Kynect, Kentucky’s insurance exchange. [Business First]

At first it looks like some kind of marketing ploy. Six picnic tables, surrounded by a garbage can on a concrete slab in the middle of Same Peden Community Park in New Albany. [News & Tribune]