Felner’s Thankful For UofL Sex Scandal

Here is a new thing for old ladies sitting at home to freak out about. [WDRB]

The misery continues for many Louisville Water Co. customers trying to navigate a transition to a new $29 million computerized billing system, eight months after it went live. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, sure, let’s prosecute the victims here and not the rich as hell sports folks. [WHAS11]

Escort Katina Powell broke her silence on Tuesday, saying she has no proof that Louisville men’s basketball coach Rick Pitino knew that a former Cardinals staffer hired her and other dancers to strip and have sex with former recruits and players. [H-L]

The woman at the center of a recruiting scandal in the University of Louisville basketball program is speaking out publicly for the first time. [WLKY]

Vice President Joe Biden said he will not run for president in 2016. Biden announced his decision in a statement given from the White House on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Wait, wait, wait — rich white guys complaining about folks attempting to hold police accountable for admitted profiling? Surely not! [WAVE3]

We can’t afford to be cynical about the news that the most lucrative college hoops program in the country uses women as a form of currency. On revelations that the University of Louisville basketball program may have paid a self-described “Louisville Madam” to supply recruits with strippers and sex, the reactions have congregated into two camps: moralizers and cynics. [The Nation]

A zoning hearing on the future use of JBS Swift’s lot on Cabel Street in Butchertown has been delayed yet again. [WFPL]

Clinton said she has “serious concerns” with the proposed mergers between Anthem and Cigna and between Aetna and Humana that are currently underway. The deals will be under review by the Department of Justice for the next year or so, likely running into the next president’s tenure. [The Hill]

The University of Louisville School of Medicine’s probationary status with an accrediting body has been lifted after more than a year. [Business First]

The RDA, for now, is dead in Clark County. The Clark County Council signed an ordinance rescinding a previous vote and absolving any current membership the county would have with the Regional Development Authority. [News & Tribune]


And we don’t mean the teevee newsreaders constantly hyping up Will Russell’s sad state…

A fire in Old Louisville that left three people dead has now been ruled arson. The fire happened on South Second Street in early July. [WDRB]

You should definitely go to this! The Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center in Clarksville will reopen in January with a completely revamped exhibit space including state of the art interactive exhibits. [C-J/AKN]

Wasn’t this flipping great? Around 9 p.m. Sept 21 Johnson and Cornelius escaped from the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections Community Corrections Center on East Chestnut Street. The inmates used bed sheets to facilitate an escape. [WHAS11]

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Some Jefferson County Public School pre-kindergarten students are using drama to learn math and other subjects. [WLKY]

The amount of money the world has pledged to divest from fossil fuels now exceeds $2.6 trillion, a group of policymakers, philanthropists and activists announced Tuesday. The figure is 50 times higher than the $52 billion that had been divested exactly one year ago. [HuffPo]

OH GOD WE’RE ALL GONNA GET THE SUPER LICE! The treatment-resistant form of lice scientists are calling ‘super lice’ has been found in 25 states including Kentucky and Indiana. [WAVE3]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

More than 60 percent of Louisville’s occupied housing structures are detached, single-family buildings, according to a Washington Post analysis of U.S. Census data. [WFPL]

Remember LMPD Chief White? He’s still up to the same old crap. [Click this Clicky]

My Morning Jacket drummer Patrick Hallahan, attorney Jon Salomon and chef Bobby Benjamin will open a new restaurant called Butchertown Grocery this November in Louisville. [Business First]

The conversation has only just begun. That’s the goal of Facing Homelessness: A Community Conversation, a public forum hosted by the News and Tribune and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

The Swift Plant Is Still Beyond Disgusting

Officials with the Kentucky State Fair say attendance numbers for this year increased from 2014. [WDRB]

The West End Wal-Mart Supercenter is inching forward by filing a new landscaping plan, but a company spokesman said the retailer is waiting for settlement of a lawsuit against its proposed suburban-style design. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a gaping hole in Jeffersonville and we’re apparently not talking about that city’s mayor. [WHAS11]

About two weeks ago, as the golfers were finishing their rounds at Bardstown Country Club, Jack Conway stood in a clubhouse dining room and saw the end of summer approaching and with it, an end to some of the issues that threatened to derail his Democratic campaign for governor. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville is preparing to welcome the region’s largest international festival for the 13th year. [WLKY]

If you’re a working-age person without a job, a disability or a kid, then soon you’re not going to have access to food stamps, either. In another sign of eroding sympathy for the jobless amid a tepid economic recovery, states are restricting benefits for the unencumbered unemployed. [HuffPo]

It’s always inspirational when a child has a dream and is able to turn that dream into a reality. That’s what Rachel Ritchie from Vine Grove, KY is doing. [WAVE3]

No one will be surprised to learn that the campaign to build a national movement against gentrification is being waged out of an office in Brooklyn, New York. [The Atlantic]

The former director of Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District says she believes Metro government should be regulating diesel pollution from a lot owned by pork producer JBS Swift. Lauren Anderson said this week she thinks there’s a valid legal argument to be made for the regulation, but her former agency disagrees. [WFPL]

Tolls sure are going to be awesome for Louisville. The Chicago Skyway is a key conduit for drivers in the Chicago area looking for a weekend getaway. But on this Labor Day weekend, trips to Lake Michigan might be a lot messier than usual. [ThinkProgress]

Appears BF has turned into a publication about whatever whim Jonathan Blue and his relatives decide to play with in a given week. [Business First]

Indiana University Southeast was recognized as one of the country’s safest campuses on a national website. [News & Tribune]

Some Fun(?) Educational Roundup Things

Eastern High School staff physically and verbally harassed a football player over accusations of smoking marijuana, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday. [WDRB]

Amid growing protests claiming the building of a methane plant in western Louisville continues a legacy of environmental racism, Mayor Greg Fischer says the Fort Wayne, Ind.-based company behind the project will spend the next two months listening to community concerns before seeking construction approval. [C-J/AKN]

The Highlands Neighborhood Association is encouraging Councilmen David Tandy and Tom Owen to permanently revoke the license of Cahoots which is located on Bardstown Road. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to move five candidates forward in the search for the next state education commissioner. The candidates, who have not been named, are in-state and out-of-state educators. However, the board did not preclude adding finalists when it meets Friday in Lexington, before the start of second-round interviews. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Crews are quickly restoring Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home, with big plans for it to attract visitors from around the world. [WLKY]

Last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a dire report about the state of the planet: July 2015 was the earth’s warmest month on record, dating back to 1880. [HuffPo]

With its largest-ever incoming class starting school Monday, Spalding University celebrated the growth by rebranding and renaming its new Kentucky College of Art and Design. [WAVE3]

Applications for U.S. home mortgages edged up last week as interest rates declined, an industry group said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

A neighborhood group is hoping concerns about public health and the environment will factor into a city board’s decision to grant a conditional use permit to pork producer JBS Swift. [WFPL]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

Students at Mount Tabor Elementary in New Albany can now use a finger scanning system from Horizon Software to pay for school meals, but some parents are worried about the new technology. [Business First]

Community Montessori High School senior Nick Vaughn narrowly lost in the May New Albany City Council District 6 Republican Party primary. He had a plan to start a work program to benefit disadvantaged residents, and though it won’t be implemented yet in a governmental platform, Vaughn has launched a nonprofit aimed at ushering low-income families out of poverty. [News & Tribune]

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Ignoring Fischer In Favor Of Derby Excitement Is Tough To Do

If you haven’t seen it yet, it looks like this is going to be a rough week for Republican Jamie Comer. [Page One]

Nine schools in Jefferson County that have been among the lowest performing in Kentucky may soon shed the stigmatizing label of “priority school,” depending on how students fare on the next round of state tests in a few weeks. [WDRB]

A judge has ruled in favor of the JBS/Swift pork plant in Butchertown in a legal dispute with the neighborhood association over whether the plant should have been allowed to make certain improvements or additions to its facilities. [C-J/AKN]

Dance with Grace studio owner John Gividen is still trying to wrap his head around what happened Thursday night, April 23. His longtime client Lucy Zeh was shot and gravely injured by her estranged husband Frederick Zeh right outside the dance studio. [WHAS11]

A reward for information in the slayings for a Central Kentucky mother and daughter has been increased to $50,000, the victims’ family said. [H-L]

The winners of the marathon, the mini marathon and the wheelchair division have all crossed the finish line. [WLKY]

Progressive Democrats have been hoping to see a showdown between Elizabeth Warren and Hillary Clinton for years. Instead, they’re getting a public feud between the senator from Massachusetts and President Barack Obama. [HuffPo]

Despite the threat of severe weather across Louisville, thousands of people attended opening night festivities at Churchill Downs. [WAVE3]

When will President Barack Obama apologize for all the other innocent victims of drone strikes? [The Intercept]

Milton Engebretson starts his church’s van. He’s in his third week of what has become a daily ritual: driving around Austin, Indiana, transporting people to the town’s Community Outreach Center. [WFPL]

Same-sex marriage is legal in most states but so is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation. [NPR]

I’ll come right out and admit it: I’ve never been to the Kentucky Derby. I’ll take it a bit further: I’ve also never been to the Kentucky Oaks, and I’ve always found a way to avoid Thunder. [Business First]

Only two of New Albany’s six district council races feature a contested primary, but those races feature multiple candidates. [News & Tribune]

Obama Visit Will Snarl Traffic Like Woah

Several Louisville Metro Council members have thrown support behind new legislation aimed at regulating large parties in abandoned buildings. [WDRB]

A national traffic-congestion study ranked Louisville as the 36th worst city in the United States, which will probably come as no surprise to Louisville commuters. It’s also the 128th worst on the international list. [C-J/AKN]

A lawsuit over bullying at Ramsey Middle School is expected to be filed against Jefferson County Public Schools Wednesday. [WHAS11]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday shortened the prison sentences of nearly two dozen drug convicts, including eight serving life in prison, in an act the White House said continues Obama’s push to make the justice system fairer by reducing harsh sentences that were handed down under outdated guidelines. [H-L]


Taxes are a pain. Health insurance is a pain. This year, Americans will suffer both when they file their income taxes. Ouch. [HuffPo]

The 141st Kentucky Derby isn’t until May 2, but the solid gold winner’s trophy arrived at Churchill Downs on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

No one in Louisville is surprised that Commissioner of Education Terry Holliday is tucking tail and running away. [Page One]

Proposed luxury apartments in Butchertown may get some help from the city. Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee signed off on a plan last week that would give a tax break for a new building between Main and Clay streets housing 263 luxury apartments. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court delivered a victory to state health departments on Tuesday, ruling that private Medicaid doctors cannot sue states to raise their reimbursement rates. [The Hill]

The Kentucky International Convention Center at 221 S. Fourth St. will be closing from August 2016 to summer 2018 to accommodate work on its $180 million expansion and renovation. [Business First]

Dr. Jerome Adams, Indiana’s state health commissioner, has a message for individuals potentially affected by the HIV outbreak in Scott County: You aren’t alone, and we can help you. [News & Tribune]

Thought All Was Piggies & Rainbows At Swift?

You can thank David Jones for most of this mess. If you missed it, he was losing his marbles during Monday evening’s meeting, claiming no one but the board had any say so in whether Hargens got a sweet contract renewal. Little has changed since the days of Daeschner and Berman. Remember those shysters? Only now it’s not just us — Toni can smell b.s. a mile away (with the exception of Terry Holliday b.s.). [Toni Konz]

The fines keep stacking up the JBS Swift slaughterhouse and meat packing plant in Louisville’s Butchertown neighborhood. [C-J/AKN]

They are not police officers just yet, but you can already see the tension as new Louisville Metro Police recruits are put into potentially life-threatening situations such as a mock break-in at a business. [WHAS11]

Republican candidate for governor Matt Bevin said he would undo the expansion of the state’s Medicaid system, a move that would take away health insurance from nearly 400,000 people. [H-L]

Another day, another… wait for it… Four people were transported after an accident involving a JCPS bus. [WLKY]

The bill to rein in PETA’s killing at their headquarters in Virginia passed the House of Delegates in a landslide 95-2 vote. Shelters will now be required by definition to make efforts to adopt out animals, instead of summarily killing them. [HuffPo]

The Metro Air Pollution Control District has levied $48,000 in fines against JBS Swift, but says the company can settle the fines for less if they take certain steps. [WAVE3]

Cockfighting lover Matt Bevin says he has a seven point economic plan for Kentucky, which means nothing. Check out the looks of his 700 kids’ faces. Not even they take him seriously. [CN|Toots]

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, will visit Louisville next month at the end of a U.S. tour. [WFPL]

Several Republican governors who are nervous about a Supreme Court ruling are asking Congress for help — even if it puts them at odds with their own party. [The Hill]

By now, you probably have heard that the 40-story National City Tower in downtown Louisville has changed owners. [Business First]

What are the most pressing needs in Clark and Floyd counties? [News & Tribune]