Some Fun Humana Things Happening…

Wait, 448 square feet is tiny? In May, WDRB took you to Louisville’s very first permanent tiny house, which had just broken ground. Five months later, we take you inside now that the house is finished. [WDRB]

In her first comments to a reporter since the publication of her book, “Breaking Cardinal Rules,” Katina Powell said in a brief interview Friday that her daughters support the book in which she claims she provided them as escorts for University of Louisville players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

After months of community meetings discussing the site for the proposed West Louisville FoodPort, organizers held an event to celebrate the season as well share more information about the project Saturday. [WHAS11]

Democrat Andy Beshear and Republican Whitney Westerfield are the men publicly running to be Kentucky’s next attorney general. But behind the scenes, scores of corporations, wealthy businessmen, lawyers, lobbyists and labor unions have given several million dollars to two independent groups loosely affiliated with the Democratic and Republican parties, which are spending that money on a barrage of attack ads meant to influence voters. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A triple shooting in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood leaves two dead and one injured. [WLKY]

Migrants streaming across the Balkans reached Slovenia on Saturday, diverted overnight by the closure of Hungary’s border with Croatia in the latest demonstration of Europe’s disjointed response to the flow of people reaching its borders. [HuffPo]

Of all the things that are hard to understand, shots fired at a visitation are near the top of the list. Especially, when it was gun fire that claimed the life of the 22-year-old in the casket. [WAVE3]

Maybe we’ll take homelessness this seriously in Louisville some day. Hawaii’s governor has signed an emergency proclamation to deal with the problem of homelessness, saying the state faces the country’s highest per capita rate of homelessness and more needs to be done to house the indigent. [Reuters]

West Louisville residents are organizing against a proposed biodigester plant, where organic waste would be converted into methane gas. The efforts come as Louisville Metro officials — including Mayor Greg Fischer — and the energy company behind the proposal work to educate the community about the technology. [WFPL]

It used to be a given: When your kids reached school age, they’d strap on their backpacks and head for the neighborhood elementary school. Or, you’d pay a hefty tuition to send them to private school. In the last two decades, a third option has emerged. Today, there are more than 6,000 charter schools in the country. And lately, they’ve been the subject of passionate and often acrimonious debate about the right way to fix public education in America. [NPR]

The guests have arrived, the band is playing and bride and groom are meeting at the altar. Then the chaplain asks, “does anyone object?” That’s the question Monday for insurers Humana Inc. and Aetna Inc., as shareholders of both companies vote on whether to approve a merger that would combine Humana’s growing Medicare business with Aetna’s portfolio to create the second-largest managed-care company in the United States. [Business First]

Legislation, its effects on funding public schools and the advent of major changes in public education are the discussion table for a meeting of the Indiana Coalition for Public Education on Wednesday, Oct. 21. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administrative Dumpster Fire Part 850

Oldham County voters will soon decide if alcohol will be sold throughout the county. [WDRB]

When will taxpayers have to stop paying Bonnie Hackbarth’s lying ass? [C-J/AKN]

Criticizing teachers probably isn’t the smartest thing for this principal to do. [More C-J/AKN]

Yet another reason Donna Hargens and her shady pal, Bonnie Hackbarth, have got to go. [WHAS11]

In the ever expanding universe of Kentucky bourbon, it can be hard to keep up with new distilleries and new things to sample. But it is so much fun trying. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are still investigating after a body was found inside a box. [WLKY]

A worsening political dispute on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group threatens one of the few silver linings for U.S. policy in the Middle East. [HuffPo]

A silent killer may be responsible for taking the lives of a Louisville couple. Deputy Coroner Cindy Thoene said Donald Hayes, 64, Barbara Hayes, 57, and their two dogs were discovered dead inside their home in the 9400 block of Dawson Hill Road around 3:15 p.m. on Oct.12. [WAVE3]

University of Louisville is investigating claims that a former staffer hired escorts to have sex with basketball players and recruits. [NPR]

People living with sickle cell disease may have a new treatment option that can cure them of the blood disorder. [WFPL]

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers? [ProPublica]

A new report from global commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield and its Louisville affiliate, Commercial Kentucky Inc., shows a continual decline in office vacancy while projecting a somewhat rosy outlook for the local economy. [Business First]

The Clarksville Town Council shied away from granting start-up funds to the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administration Just Needs To Go

Louisville Metro Police found a body in a box in southern Jefferson County Tuesday afternoon, according to a spokesperson. [WDRB]

Two Humana Inc. shareholders have filed suit to block Aetna’s purchase of the Louisville-based health care giant, contending that the $37 billion acquisition isn’t a good deal for stockholders who stood to benefit from the company’s bright future. [C-J/AKN]

Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore has issued an executive order to put more firefighters on the streets. [WHAS11]

The most celebrated jockey in Lexington this month won’t be riding in Keeneland’s fall meet, or afterward at the Breeders’ Cup. In fact, he died 119 years ago. [H-L]

The college basketball season tips off in about four weeks, but for the University of Louisville the focus is on what did or didn’t happen off the court. [WLKY]

Appalachia struggles with a disproportionate disease burden, and poor sleep is part of it. [HuffPo]

Jefferson County Public School leaders met on Monday for the first time since one of their key administrators ended his employment with the district. [WAVE3]

Jennifer Lawrence has written an essay expressing her anger at getting paid less than her male co-stars. [BBC]

Louisville’s electric vehicle enthusiast group will cut the ribbon this weekend on the group’s first public vehicle charger. [WFPL]

Earlier this month, Wal-Mart trumpeted that it had beaten a goal it set five years ago: to open at least 275 stores in food deserts by 2016. That targeted expansion into “neighborhoods without access to fresh affordable groceries” came as part of the retailer’s “healthier food initiative,” lauded by — and launched with — First Lady Michelle Obama in 2011. Wal-Marts have been popping up in lower-income urban areas where grocery stores are scarce ever since. [NPR]

The Louisville-Lexington area’s economy is currently firing on all cylinders, blowing by the nation at large, according to a new study from The PNC Financial Services Group. And the good news is expected to continue through the end of the year and into 2016, according to PNC. [Business First]

Clarksville residents should soon see more police patrols in their neighborhoods thanks to a $250,000 grant awarded to the Clarksville Police Department. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Kill Like This

200 trees? Try 200,000. Then we can start talking about the tree canopy here in Possibility City. [WDRB]

A bipartisan pair of Louisville council members want to restrict Mayor Greg Fischer’s office from making any changes to the city’s portion of the Neighborhood Place partnership without Metro Council approval. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating the murder of a man found at the intersection of 20th and Chestnut streets. [WHAS11]

More than 100 former Jefferson County Public Schools students who dropped out are now re-enrolled in classes. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway after two people were found dead Monday afternoon inside a home in southeastern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Eight people have been wounded by gunfire in the Greater Louisville area since Friday afternoon. Four of them died. It is in this background that Louisville Councilwoman Mary C. Woolridge will introduce the new Commander of the Louisville Metro Police Department Second Division to the community.

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The author of the bestselling book on people’s relationship with water will be among the speakers Monday during the IdeaFestival Water event. [WFPL]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Sarah Davasher-Wisdom has been promoted to senior vice president of public affairs and strategy at Greater Louisville Inc. [Business First]

Throughout all three debates this election season, Jeffersonville mayoral candidates Mike Moore and Dennis Julius challenged the accuracy of some of each others’ statements, asking audience members to look it up for themselves. [News & Tribune]

Bad News For UofL Continues To Flow

When Kentucky and Indiana start charging drivers to cross the Ohio River next year, a cadre of behind-the-scenes workers will oversee toll transactions on three bridges. It’s estimated that more than 110,000 vehicles will use those spans each day. [WDRB]

A “major progress announcement” in regard to the Downtown Crossing portion of the Ohio River Bridges Project is scheduled to be made by Gov. Steve Beshear and other top officials Monday morning. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting in Possibility City. [WHAS11]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

Oh, wait! Another day, another pedestrian death in Possibility Compassionate City. [WLKY]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

It’s the latest unfavorable national headline for the University of Louisville. This one reads, “Louisville created and continues to nurture dangerous culture for women,” and it tops a story that was posted on Sports Illustrated’s website Friday. [WAVE3]

Back in 1990, as the debate over climate change was heating up, a dissident shareholder petitioned the board of Exxon, one of the world’s largest oil companies, imploring it to develop a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from its production plants and facilities. The board’s response: Exxon had studied the science of global warming and concluded it was too murky to warrant action. The company’s “examination of the issue supports the conclusions that the facts today and the projection of future effects are very unclear.” [LA Times]

In what alternate universe does Louisville have a transportation plan that doesn’t suck? [WFPL]

The color of debt: how collection suits squeeze black neighborhoods. [ProPublica]

Louisville, meet your new integration overlord. His name is Rick Jelinek, and he’s been selected by Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. to help it integrate Louisville-based health insurer Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

Clarksville is moving forward with the next phase of its comprehensive plan, with the Planning Commission now working toward writing up the formal plan based on input gathered at five recent public meetings. [News & Tribune]

Latest UofL Dumpster Fire Rages On

Louisville Metro Fire needs your help identifying someone it calls a person of interest in a fire that killed three people. [WDRB]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

University of Louisville announced on Tuesday, Oct. 6, it is reviewing allegations regarding the men’s basketball program. [WHAS11]

Eleven employees in the Jefferson County public school district have filed a lawsuit saying they shouldn’t be forced to pay union fees if they don’t want to be part of the union. [H-L]

You should probably go to this pumpkin thing. The third annual Jack-O-Lantern Spectacular will be held Oct. 8 through Nov. 1 at Iroquois Park. [WLKY]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

Changes could be coming to the Original Highlands. The Board of Zoning adjustments gave the green light for Edwards Communities Development Company to build 194 apartments on the site where Mercy Academy sits empty on East Broadway. [WAVE3]

Girls, many of whom have suffered a range of trauma at home, make up a growing share of children arrested and detained across the country. [ProPublica]

An academic conference on the environmental history of the Ohio River Valley kicks off in Louisville later this week. [WFPL]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

American Commercial Lines Inc., which is based in Jeffersonville, announced Thursday that it has agreed to acquire AEP River Operations LLC from American Electric Power Co. Inc. AEP River Operations is a commercial inland barge company that delivers about 45 million tons of products each year. The company is based in Chesterfield, Mo., and has operations in Paducah, Ky., and Convent, Algiers and Belle Chasse, La., the News and Tribune reports. [Business First]

Victims of domestic violence in need of immediate legal protection in Floyd County now have a place to turn to after regular business hours. [News & Tribune]

Death Murder Death Murder Death

Authorities have released the name of a woman who was found murdered near Churchill Downs. [WDRB]

Immigration and criminal defense lawyer Daniel Alvarez has gained the endorsement of Citizens for Better Judges in the highly contested Jefferson District Court race. [C-J/AKN]

LMPD are investigating a stabbing that happened in the 5100 block of Crafty Drive located in the Lynnview neighborhood. [WHAS11]

New ribbon advertising boards have been installed around the second tier of Rupp Arena, the first part of a two-year, $15 million technology upgrade for Lexington’s most recognized landmark. [H-L]

This got a lot less buzz than we expected. Particularly in light of the double-dipping. Louisville has a new chief of community building. Mayor Greg Fischer named Yvette Gentry to lead the department. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School personnel action document reveals 30 of the districts bus drivers and substitute bus drivers resigned, retired or were terminated from early August to the middle of September. [WAVE3]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

Home repairs can be a frightful burden for Louisville residents who live in poverty or on fixed incomes. [WFPL]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

An empty elementary school in downtown Jeffersonville will soon be torn down to make way for a 93-room upper mid-scale hotel. [Business First]

Telling stories of epidemics and disasters through the eyes of those who lived — and died — in them, “Stories Behind the Stones: Disease, Disasters and the Downtrodden” offered tours of Fairview Cemetery over the weekend. [News & Tribune]