JCPS, MSD, Death, Frankfort, AWFUL

The principal of Moore Traditional School will not be able to lead the school after a state diagnostic review has determined she does not have the capacity to oversee the school’s turnaround efforts. [WDRB]

If the Metropolitan Sewer District won’t hide its planned 17-million gallon sewage storage basin underground, Smoketown residents are promising a political fight through “direct action” and litigation. [C-J/AKN]

The Louisville Free Public Library will receive a $10,000 grant after winning first place in a national competition. [WHAS11]

The House-Senate negotiations to craft a two-year, $21 billion state budget lasted more than three hours Friday without any resolutions while concerns about funding for Kentucky’s courts intensified. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting, you know how this plays out. [WLKY]

These are the kind of extremists who support Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

Some concrete animal statues were moved from a long-closed restaurant and local media outlets treated it as a top story yesterday. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear said he believes the state can lead the way in research on the effectiveness of a new drug treatment program centered on Vivitrol. [Ashland Independent]

Researchers Kyle Barnett and Christine Ehrick are saving Kentucky sound. Not saving as in redeeming, of course. They’re preserving the audio that is unique to the state’s character. [WFPL]

Rock climbers hope a new study of their economic impact in the Red River Gorge will help make the case for opening more public land in the area for climbing. [WKYT]

Real estate developer America Place LLC could break ground on its next project at the 6,000-acre River Ridge Commerce Center in Jeffersonville as early as next month. [Business First]

Clark County residents have the chance to learn the ins and outs of their sheriff’s office at a Citizen’s Law Enforcement Academy this spring. [News & Tribune]

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Clark County Schools Seem A Hot Mess

Busing kids in Clark County may have just hit a pothole. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five intersections have been identified as the most dangerous locations for pedestrians to cross, according to a five-year study by city officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Now Jim Ramsey wants to meet one-on-one with University of Louisville trustees. [WHAS11]

Another bad week for Damon Thayer… Matt Bevin cannot remove members of the Kentucky Horse Park Commission but must allow them to serve out defined terms, according to an opinion released Monday by Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Off-duty police officers will be walking the streets in Old Louisville. It’s part of an initiative to cut down on crime in the area. [WLKY]

There’s a presidential candidate being compared to Adolf Hitler — and odds are, it’s not the one you’re thinking of. Disgraced televangelist Jim Bakker recently equated the support Democratic hopeful Bernie Sanders is getting from America’s youth to support for Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany. [HuffPo]

“I-STEP is just another standardized test that doesn’t do anything but give kids anxiety,” Leslie Rayborn, mother of a Clarksville Elementary School student, said. “It doesn’t measure their true potential.” [WAVE3]

Some Republican state senators spent a long weekend back and forth between family and working on their version of a two-year state budget. [Ronnie Ellis]

Oldham County has the state’s best health outcomes, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. [WFPL]

Republican leaders adamantly opposed to Donald J. Trump’s candidacy are preparing a 100-day campaign to deny him the presidential nomination, starting with an aggressive battle in Wisconsin’s April 5 primary and extending into the summer, with a delegate-by-delegate lobbying effort that would cast Mr. Trump as a calamitous choice for the general election. [NY Times]

Another day, another hurdle for the merger of Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. There are a number of people scrutinizing the deal and its possible impact on competition among health insurers, but antitrust regulators said this week that they’ll pay especially close attention. [Business First]

Floyd County employees hoping to soon vote for union representation will have to wait a little longer, that is if the commissioners give them the opportunity to vote at all. [News & Tribune]

Can We Quit Pretending We’re Compassionate?

Strengths and weaknesses of each Jefferson County Public Schools facility, a redesign proposal that would impact three middle schools and the Class of 2016 graduation schedule will all be up for discussion on Tuesday. [WDRB]

Some 7,700 Louisville Water Co. service lines are made of lead – and now for the first time, customers can quickly check to see whether those old pipes are made of lead. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s new State Police Commissioner was announced Monday and they’re from right here in the Louisville area. [WHAS11]

A judge has denied a request by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration to temporarily close a Lexington abortion clinic that the state claims is operating illegally. [H-L]

A man shot and killed his wife and children before setting their house on fire and killing himself in Saratoga Springs on Sunday, Louisville Metro Police said. [WLKY]

After nearly a decade of generally lukewarm concern over what’s been called the “greatest threat“ of our time, Americans are finally taking climate change seriously. [HuffPo]

It wouldn’t be a day in Compassionate City without a school bus accident. mergency crews responded to a multi-vehicle crash involving a school bus. [WAVE3]

It’s 2016, but the Eastern Kentucky Correctional Complex didn’t get the memo. The minimum and medium security prison in West Liberty, Kentucky has a mail policy that prohibits prisoners from receiving books and magazines that “promote homosexuality” — whatever the prison thinks that means. In just a four-month period in 2015, EKCC used the policy 13 different times to confiscate mail including letters, cards, “pages out of book,” and magazines like Out and The Advocate. [ACLU]

It’s obvious just from looking at it that the Black Leaf site in West Louisville is in an extreme state of disrepair. [WFPL]

Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid (Nev.) on Thursday called on Republican leaders in Congress to renounce Donald Trump because of his controversial views, saying their “moral cowardice” led to the GOP presidential front-runner’s rise. [The Hill]

Don’t expect another big purchase from Kindred Healthcare Inc. anytime soon — at least, not in the world of home health care. [Business First]

Floyd County Democratic Party Chairman Adam Dickey has announced the declared candidates for a special vacancy caucus for the position of party vice chair. The caucus was called following the resignation of Stacy Deck last month. [News & Tribune]

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Compassionate City Got More Deadly

One person was killed and another person was injured in two separate shootings Saturday evening. [WDRB]

Surprise! A corrupt labor organization (any labor group defending flipping AT&T is not acting on behalf of its membership, period) is butthurt that there might be real competition in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

The Louisville Metro Police Department confirmed they are investigating the death of a 5-month-old. [WHAS11]

Janet Patton always brings it when it comes to reporting facts that Damon Thayer hates. The Kentucky Horse Park is “making good progress,” state Tourism, Parks and Heritage Secretary Don Parkinson said after hearing Wednesday that the park is on track to meet budget projections for the year. [H-L]

Metro police are investigating another homicide. This one occurred in South Louisville just a few blocks west of Wyandotte Park. [WLKY]

Half of America believes Donald Trump’s campaign exhibits fascist overtones, with only 30 percent disagreeing, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll. The sentiment isn’t contained to Democrats, who unsurprisingly are willing to agree with a negative statement about their political rivals. Forty-five percent of independents also say Trump’s campaign has echoes of fascism, as do a full 28 percent of Republicans. [HuffPo]

Two people were shot in the 900 block of Esquire Alley around 6:38 p.m. Saturday evening. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate for February 2016 stayed at 5.8 percent from a revised 5.8 percent in January 2016, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. [Press Release]

The state House of Representatives approved a bill on Friday that would create a new class of criminal punishment called “acute misdemeanor.” [WFPL]

House Democrats took Republicans and their new governor, Matt Bevin, somewhat by surprise by including a larger up-front contribution to Kentucky’s troubled pension systems than expected in the budget the House passed Wednesday on strict party line votes. [Ronnie Ellis]

Humana Inc.’s top executives could be in for a big payday if they’re still with the company when its pending merger is completed. [Business First]

Sellersburg’s newly elected clerk-treasurer and appointed chief deputy will not have accrued longevity and paid time off reinstated after a five-month break in their employment last year. [News & Tribune]

HOW Is JBS Still In The Damn News?!

Inclusivity is powerful. Much more than being just the opposite of exclusivity, it’s a distinct way of looking at the world. Its power has been revealed to me over and over in the internet business, in political campaigns, and from living in my adopted hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. [Matthew Barzun]

Seniors in Jefferson County Public Schools would graduate over a three-day period at the end of May, according to a proposal that will be up for school board approval on Tuesday, March 22. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric Company warned Mayor Greg Fischer on Monday it will stop collecting a 2 percent fee used to fund public safety and other community initiatives if a new franchise agreement cannot be reached by the end of March. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! JBS Swift plant’s plan to begin killing pigs using CO2, rather than the current method of electrocution, called for a public meeting Wednesday night. [WHAS11]

John Sanders’ room on the second floor of St. James Place is comfortable yet cramped. There is no storage space for his pots and utensils in the small kitchenette on one side of his room. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman was rushed to University Hospital after a shooting Wednesday night in southwest Louisville. [WLKY]

In an effort to curb America’s deadly opioid crisis, federal health officials are urging doctors to largely avoid prescribing highly addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin when treating patients for chronic pain. [HuffPo]

Critics say it’s a destruction of civil rights. Supporters say it’s part of Kentucky’s constitution. Tuesday, Kentucky’s Senate has passed a bill allowing businesses to refuse service to people based on their religious beliefs in certain situation. [WAVE3]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A call this week for fiber Internet service providers to begin applying for franchise status marks the next step in Louisville’s quest to become a gigabit city. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell spoke to Donald Trump on Tuesday and recommended that the business mogul condemn violence at his rallies. [Politico]

The state of Florida has already given Humana Inc. the OK to merge with its Connecticut-based competitor, Aetna Inc. But some doctors groups aren’t so sure. [Business First]

The first phase of a project to install security cameras along Riverside Drive in Clarksville is completed and the town is ready for phase two. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

Still Loving The Christy Brown Shade

The federal government is throwing new resources at the growing heroin problem in Kentucky and throughout the nation. [WDRB]

Louisville planners recommended Thursday morning that short-term rentals be allowed in most zoning districts but that a special permit should be necessary if the unit is not a host’s primary residence. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The best part of this whole Speed Museum coverage? All the photos of Christy Brown throwing shade at Matt Bevin. May we all grow up to be as skilled as her. [WHAS11]

Lexington is apparently trying to imitate Louisville again. Second overnight shooting in a week. [H-L]

Valley Station may be one of the few areas of the city where Rand Paul would be welcomed with open arms. [WLKY]

Another Donald Trump supporter was caught on video evoking Nazis as he yelled at protesters following a rally in Cleveland on Saturday. “Go to Auschwitz,” the man said to the protesters after raising his arm in an apparent Nazi salute. “Go to fucking Auschwitz.” [HuffPo]

Really, all that shade Christy Brown threw was terrific. Somebody please give her an award. [WAVE3]

Apollo Global Management says it’s buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc., for $1.36 billion, in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market’s closing stock price last week. [NPR]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced federal funding for several Kentucky health care centers to help fight the state’s opioid epidemic. [WFPL]

How hot was it last month globally? It was so hot that the famed Iditarod sled race in Alaska brought in extra snow from hundreds of miles away by train. [ThinkProgress]

Two-thirds of state economic development spending benefits big businesses, according to a sample of three states analyzed by Good Jobs First. [Business First]

One of the last things left before Gateway Park opens in Clarksville is to wait for the grass to fill in. [News & Tribune]

Brown Gave Master Class In Throwing Shade

Community activist Angela Newby-Bouggess has died. [WDRB]

Nearly 500 sexual assault kits that would have continued to sit untested in the Louisville Metro Police property room will now be sent for lab testing after a shift in LMPD philosophy. The department is sending 1,386 untested rape kits to Kentucky State Police for testing – 463 more than originally intended. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “We have to start opening our eyes and reconciling the fact that these things happened,” says Attorney Larry Wilder, a statement he has repeated since October when his client’s book Breaking Cardinal Rules hit store shelves. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission has dedicated 88 acres to an existing preserve in Pulaski County. [H-L]

Another day, another fun pedestrian accident in Possibility Compassionate City! [WLKY]

The White House has narrowed its search for a Supreme Court nominee to three federal appeals court judges, Sri Srinivasan, Merrick Garland and Paul Watford, a source familiar with the selection process said on Friday. [HuffPo]

If she can do it, you can do it. One year after her story went viral, Asia Ford returned to the Rodes City Run 10K Saturday. [WAVE3]

Obama Administration transparency is a lot like Fischer Administration transparency. It’s not a real thing. Two years ago last month, I filed a public-records request to the Federal Emergency Management Agency as part of my reporting into the flawed response to Hurricane Sandy. Then, I waited. [ProPublica]

Kelly Downard has apparently turned into all bark and no bite. No clue what happened to him but he’s been entirely neutered. [WFPL]

Environmental policies are often vilified as economical agents of destruction. From the Clean Power Plan, to methane rules, to the Paris Agreement, every time a new environmental policy is proposed detractors argue that new rules drive costs up, kill jobs, and hamper trade. But a new study is challenging the idea that curbing pollution hurts business to the point of stifling export trade. [ThinkProgress]

A pair of sisters is opening a barber shop that will be a little different than most others. [Business First]

Two contracts up for a vote in April got some scrutiny by the New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corp.’s board of trustees work session Monday. [News & Tribune]