Even Bill Lamb Calls Letter Absurd

Conservative Bill Lamb is causing racist white peoples’ heads to explode. When Bill Lamb is on the same side as Attica Scott when it comes to the FOP’s threatening letter? All hell is gonna break loose. [WDRB]

A joint interim Kentucky legislative committee called Wednesday for updating the rules governing property tax assessments while questioning Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer about whether his office is examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

efferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer appeared Wednesday morning before a legislative panel at Kentucky’s Capitol to explain and defend his office’s valuation practices. [WHAS11]

Pope Francis’ call for urgent action to combat climate change isn’t having much influence on members of Congress from the coal state of Kentucky, who are working this week to block the centerpiece of the president’s agenda to limit the greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s budget committee voted to add more than $5 million for road repairs. [WLKY]

Those who believe slavery was not a central point of conflict in the Civil War may wish to peruse the South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas declarations of secession. Those documents all explicitly cite threats to slavery as reasons for secession. Mississippi’s declaration goes so far as to say that “a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization.” [HuffPo]

Critics are questioning lawmakers jumping on the anti-confederate bandwagon and the president of the NAACP Kentucky State Conference and Louisville Chapter Raoul Cunningham said he’s just fine with that. [WAVE3]

The old gay Louisville. A writer returns to the city where he was raised—and exiled—to find what was lost when gay life entered the mainstream. [TNR]

The Louisville Metro Tree Commission holds its final meeting this evening and is expected to vote on a draft ordinance that could create a new tree commission and new city policies for tree management. [WFPL]

An overwhelming majority of Americans say they believe protests against unfair government treatment make the United States a better country. Unless, that is, the protesters are black. [WaPo]

For Tim Gramig, a longtime broker Louisville’s commercial real estate market, opportunity has knocked twice this year. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan failed to sign an ordinance calling for certain financial information be provided to the New Albany City Council at the last meeting of each month. In response, the council voted unanimously Thursday to again approve the measure, and thus overrode the pocket veto of Gahan. A pocket veto occurs when an executive takes no action on a bill as opposed to an outright veto of the measure. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Compassionate Murder In Fischer’s Transparent City

MetroSafe dispatchers have confirmed that homicide detectives are investigating after a man’s body was found on the ground in the west end. [WDRB]

Activists said Sunday that the police shooting of a black man in Old Louisville a day earlier illustrates their claim that officers too often use excessive force to subdue people of color, and they said they hope it leads to police measures to increase transparency. [C-J/AKN]

Owning a home doesn’t come cheap and costs of maintenance and repairs to both inside as well as outside can add up. For the elderly and disabled, paying for the costs isn’t always easy. [WHAS11]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [H-L]

A Kentucky company that’s a top maker of whiskey and other spirits is buying a southern Indiana lumber mill that will turn out wooden segments for its bourbon barrels. Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman Corp. will spend $12 million to buy and expand that Owen County mill. [WLKY]

Any city struggling to house its residents should look no further than Houston for a few pointers. [HuffPo]

While facts began to surface about Saturday’s officer-involved shooting, local activists came together Sunday to discuss the fatal event. Their main concern is that they say the officer used unnecessary force. [WAVE3]

A group led by anti-gay pastor Rick Scarborough is vowing to defy any ruling by the Supreme Court that recognizes same-sex marriage. Louisville’s Six Flags Over Jesus is part of the group. [ThinkProgress]

A dramatic decline in Kentuckians earning GED diplomas over the last two years has led some lawmakers to question the current version of the test, which rolled out in January of 2014. [WFPL]

Workers are putting the finishing touches on rows of barracks in a 50-acre camp here, the largest immigration detention center in the country. It houses thousands of women and their children who were caught crossing the border illegally and are seeking asylum in the United States. [NY Times]

Nature’s Methane, an Indiana-based biofuel company, has plans to build not one but two biofuel facilities in west Louisville. [Business First]

The Louisville Metro Corrections officer who was charged with driving drunk along Spring Street and almost striking a patrol car before crashing through the Jeffersonville Overlook last year was sentenced to one year probation with a hefty price tag. [News & Tribune]

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]

People Freaking Out Over Humana

Aaron Wheatley estimates he spends four to five days on the Ohio River each week in his hunt for big catfish. [WDRB]

The Ford Motor Co. president and CEO Mark Fields outlined a bouyant vision for the automaker’s future and Louisville’s role during a lunch speech Friday. [C-J/AKN]

A mother’s love knows no bounds. WHAS11 was given permission to listen to a voice mail from Dashieka Ross—it was sent to her 20-year-old daughter Raveen Horn. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul stood before nearly 200 fans Saturday afternoon and made clear his intentions to force the expiration of the Patriot Act when the U.S. Senate meets for a rare session Sunday. [H-L]

According to newly released police interviews, the fatal shooting of a 16-year-old Louisville girl is linked to the death of a 14-year-old boy months earlier. [WLKY]

The new 21c in Durham looks pretty great. [HuffPo]

Almost 4,000 local GE workers are entering a critical few weeks for their future. Their union is about to start negotiating a new contract, fighting for better pay and benefits as GE looks to control costs. [WAVE3]

Ford Motor Company issued two new recalls Wednesday covering nearly 445,000 vehicles after receiving numerous complaint and incident reports, including at least four accidents related to loss of power steering and high underbody temperatures. [Consumerist]

Louisville Metro Council members unanimously approved an ordinance Thursday temporarily changing a flood rule that has left a number of homeowners with flood-damaged homes they can’t repair. [WFPL]

Saturday night’s statewide Republican dinner was supposed to be about unity, and it was, in more ways than one. But none of his former opponents showed up. [Ronnie Ellis]

Shares of Humana Inc. closed Friday with a 20 percent gain after a report by The Wall Street Journal that the Louisville-based health-benefits company is considering being acquired. [Business First]

Brandon Terry reaches his hand into a brown paper bag and tosses its contents onto his coffee table — a pack of syringes, sterile cotton swabs, a ream of condoms. He also has an orange box with hazardous warning stickers on the side. [News & Tribune]

David Tandy-Dan Johnson Slap Fight!

Police body cameras, smoother roads with more bike lanes and affordable housing. Those are just some of the big ticket items Louisville’s mayor is asking Metro Council to approve. [WDRB]

SLAP FIGHT! Louisville Metro Councilman Dan Johnson claims Council President David Tandy physically threatened him in a private telephone conversation this week and that he may file a criminal complaint. [C-J/AKN]

Boarded up homes and vacant and abandoned properties are problem in many Louisville neighborhoods. [WHAS11]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

The school year is almost over, but some elementary students are already getting help preparing for next year. What the hell kind of opener is that? [WLKY]

The U.S. Department of Education has formally cleared Navient Corp., the student loan giant formerly part of Sallie Mae, of wrongdoing after an investigation into whether the company cheated troops on their federal student loans. The findings contradict earlier conclusions reached by the Justice Department, which sued the company in May 2014 after determining that Navient systematically overcharged troops and denied them key rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Federal prosecutors said the company’s actions were “intentional, willful, and taken in disregard for the rights of servicemembers.” [HuffPo]

As victims recover from a devastating apartment fire in southern Indiana, there are new problems. Time Warner Cable tried to collect lost equipment fees from at least two of its customers who lost everything when the Bridgepoint Apartments caught fire in April. [WAVE3]

Looks like some folks discovered the UPS hub again. [Gizmodo]

The Obama administration announced new clean water rules today that it says will protect sources of drinking water for 117 million Americans, rules welcomed by environmental groups, but bitterly opposed by congressional Republicans and farm state democrats. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

KFC Corp.’s rebranding and revival of Kentucky Fried Chicken founder Col. Harland Sanders has garnered mixed reviews. [Business First]

A former New Albany Police officer was formally terminated Thursday evening by the department’s Merit Commission on four of five charges of improper conduct. Laura Schook — who made claims in 2008 and 2010 to the merit commission of some officers filing inaccurate time sheets, corruption within the department and by not receiving proper backup on calls — was terminated by a 4-1 vote of the commission. [News & Tribune]

JCPS & MSD Want More Of Your Money

The Jefferson County Board of Education may need to seek a 4 percent property tax revenue increase later this summer in order to balance its $1.4 billion budget for the 2015-16 year, according to a tentative budget approved by the board on Monday night. [WDRB]

For the second year in a row, the Metropolitan Sewer District board is looking at a 5.5 percent increase in customers’ rates. [C-J/AKN]

The American Red Cross is hoping you have what it takes to be a hero. Unless you’re gay, then you’re dead to them. [WHAS11]

Jefferson County Public Schools has a budget that’s four times that of the Lexington-Fayette County government. [H-L]

Louisville police are working to identify a woman whose body was pulled from the Ohio River on Tuesday. [WLKY]

North American energy ministers said on Monday they had set up a working group on climate change and energy, a partnership designed to help Canada, the United States and Mexico harmonize policies. [HuffPo]

Terror can he heard in the voices of two women who called 911 and told the operator they were being shot at after leaving a gas station. [WAVE3]

The Distillery Innovation and Excise Tax Reform Act unveiled Tuesday would drop the current tax rate for distilled spirits from $13.50 per proof gallon to $2.70 per proof gallon on the first 10,000 gallons of productions for all distillers and then $9 per proof gallon after that. [The Hill]

A new health ranking of senior citizen health in the U.S. puts Kentucky near the bottom of the list. [WFPL]

One of the most basic facts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership is also the most important: It’s huge. [NPR]

Last week, I wrote about a study that indicated that women-owned businesses in Kentucky were growing more slowly than those in other states. [Business First]

The rows and rows of homemade chocolates nestled behind glass cases at Schimpff’s Confectionery soon will double. [News & Tribune]