UofL Hospital Sounds Like Tons Of Fun

A southern Indiana man was arrested in California yesterday armed with explosive chemicals and guns. Police say he told them he was headed to a gay pride event in Los Angeles. We spoke with some of Jim Howell’s neighbors who told us they had no idea how dangerous he was. [WDRB]

A leading University of Louisville surgeon says that staffing cuts by KentuckyOne Health at U of L Hospital have rendered it “unsafe” for the care of seriously ill and injured patients. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands marched from Indiana and Kentucky to show their support for the people of Orlando. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Community and Technical College System Board of Regents approved its budget for next year, which includes a 6.1 percent tuition increase for students and no raises for faculty or staff to help deal with continued budget cuts. [H-L]

Two people were taken to University Hospital after a shooting at a White Castle. [WLKY]

Rabbi Michael Lerner, a political activist and the editor of Tikkun Magazine, didn’t hesitate to get political while speaking at the funeral of sports legend Muhammad Ali, who died at age 74 on June 3. [HuffPo]

Twenty-year-old James Howell, who attended Ballard High School, has been arrested multiple times in Southern Indiana. [WAVE3]

A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun took hostages and opened fire inside a crowded Florida nightclub, killing approximately 20 people and wounding 42 others before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said Sunday. [Politico]

The Kentucky Supreme Court will decide the fate of local minimum wage laws. On Friday, the court heard arguments over whether Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance violates state law by going beyond the scope of Kentucky’s minimum wage, which is tied to the federal rate of $7.25 per hour. [WFPL]

If you support this monster, you’re enabling, supporting, okaying, begging for more hatred. Donald J. Trump on Sunday sought to capitalize on the mass shooting at a gay club in Orlando, reiterating his controversial call for a temporary ban on Muslim migration to the United States and criticizing Hillary Clinton for what he claimed was her desire to “dramatically increase admissions from the Middle East.” [NY Times]

It’s so far, so good as Aetna Inc. works to fold Humana Inc. into its business. [Business First]

A new leader has been named to guide the News and Tribune’s editorial vision. [News & Tribune]

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Puke Alert: Ali Funeral Ticket Scalpers

The Jefferson County Coroner’s office could soon be without a morgue in a battle between county and state. [WDRB]

When young Cassius Clay returned to his hometown in 1960 after winning an Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight, he was greeted by hundreds of fans at the airport, and a 30-car motorcade followed him to Central High School, his alma mater. [C-J/AKN]

People are so disgusting that they scalped tickets FOR A FUNERAL! It’s so gross we’re still thinking about it more than 24 hours later. [WHAS11]

Have you seen what’s going on in Lexington? Houses and other buildings on 10-acre lots must be excluded from the total acreage before an agricultural exemption on property taxes can be given to a homeowner, according to an official legal opinion from the Kentucky Department of Revenue to Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. [H-L]

Compassionate City has reached peak pedestrian accident. Getting hit by an LMPD cruiser takes the cake. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama mourned the death of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in a Saturday statement, remembering “The Greatest” for his talent and his spirit. [HuffPo]

Why we love Louisville: someone gets shot every day. [WAVE3]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

Demand for bourbon is putting pressure on the population of Kentucky’s white oak trees, which are used to make staves for whiskey barrels. [WFPL]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Forty-five years after founding his fire-protection company, Richard Barber was considering an expansion plan. Meanwhile, an Indiana company was looking for growth opportunities. [Business First]

Getting some answers on the process and what’s coming forward for the Summit Springs development off State Street is the aim of a city council work session Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Your Governor Is Still Super-Dumb, Folks

We weren’t joking – are you interested in buying The ‘Ville Voice? [The ‘Ville Voice]

It’s official: Bardstown is still one of the worst places on earth, probably. Thank goodness for bourbon. The mayor of Bardstown has fired the assistant chief of the Bardstown Police Department after he was allegedly caught shredding documents belonging to the City of Bardstown, according to official documents. [WDRB]

How will Scott Jennings continue trying to spin this Jim Ramsey-UofL mess? Maybe he’ll just sue everybody who mentions his lucrative contract to spin on behalf of the UofL Foundation. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ugh, who let Claudia Catfish back on the teevee? Less than 24 hours after a Valley Station family shared how it fell victim to a rental scam on CraigsList, WHAS 11 viewers stepped in to help the family raise the money it needed to avoid being forced out on the street. [WHAS11]

A Lexington council woman says she will meet with Lexington fire officials and planning staff to determine what can be done to protect homes and help firefighters in neighborhoods where homes are close together. Since September 2015, at least three fires have occurred in neighborhoods where the distance between homes was less than 10 feet. [H-L]

Crews broke ground Wednesday in Hardin County for a pipeline that will connect one of its water districts to Louisville’s water infrastructure. [WLKY]

Donald Trump would respect limits on his authority if he’s elected president, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) said Monday. [HuffPo]

In case you were wondering? Matt Bevin is dumber than anything the corrupt former governor could cough up. [WAVE3]

Police do not need a warrant to obtain a person’s cellphone location data held by wireless carriers, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Tuesday, dealing a setback to privacy advocates. [Reuters]

Once again, Louisville — a city that prides itself on its park system — has landed near the bottom of a ranking of parks. Probably because the city’s cheerleader electeds consistently ignore reality and focus on hype. [WFPL]

Donald Trump claims a net worth of more than $10 billion and an income of $557 million. But he appears to get there only by overvaluing properties and ignoring his expenses. [Politico]

Cities and businesses in Kentucky have made improvements in including the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender community — but there’s still a ways to go. [Business First]

For 10 weeks, viewers of A&E’s “60 Days In” saw the ins and outs, the good and the bad of the Clark County jail. The show also opened a conversation about the state corrections across the country. Every week, the News and Tribune hosted a panel with local experts to dig into the stories behind the show. Below are the top 5 takeaways from season one and from those weekly conversations. [News & Tribune]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Louisville Loves A Good Pedestrian Accident

A young child is in critical condition after being hit by a vehicle in west Louisville. [WDRB]

The Memorial Day weekend wasn’t the deadliest on record by any stretch, but three deaths in unrelated incidents and a shooting near University of Louisville that left a college student seriously injured still made for a tragic holiday. The slayings increased Louisville’s 2016 homicides total to 47. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a story about a pedestrian accident in J-town. [WHAS11]

The U.S Department of Labor has funded a grant worth $3.4 million to help retrain out-of-work coal miners in Kentucky. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a shooting at Lincoln and Colorado avenues. [WLKY]

As the nation once again honors American war dead on Memorial Day, instead of spouting the usual nationalistic platitudes that that U.S. soldiers fought to keep the country “safe and free,” perhaps we should analyze whether that is really true. [HuffPo]

If you’re going to run hyped up stories about suicide attempts, the least you could do is include resources for those in need. [WAVE]

The Federal Reserve should raise interest rates “in the coming months” if the economy picks up as expected and jobs continue to be generated, U.S. central bank chief Janet Yellen said on Friday, bolstering the case for a rate increase in June or July. [Reuters]

Is the Portland renaissance real? An assessment of progress. [WFPL]

Courtrooms across the nation are using computer programs to predict who will be a future criminal. The programs help inform decisions on everything from bail to sentencing. They are meant to make the criminal justice system fairer — and to weed out human biases. [ProPublica]

Wait, this came as a surprise to people? Some folks must live in an alternate universe. [Business First]

Shelters across the state are losing government money due to a massive policy shift that emphasizes permanent housing for the homeless. [News & Tribune]

MSD Will Probably Make You Crazy

JCPS wants to make sure no child goes hungry during the summer. Here’s how you can take advantage of the district’s largest summer meals effort to date. [WDRB]

In a move few expected, the Bullitt County Board of Education voted Monday night to postpone any consideration of redistricting until after January 2017. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, now GLI cares about something – the MSD rate hike. [WHAS11]

William Thielen, executive director of the Kentucky Retirement Systems, told the state pension fund’s board of trustees Thursday that he will retire effective Sept. 1 after five years in the job. [H-L]

If you can get shot in J-town, you can get shot anywhere. Compassionate City! Police are investigating a shooting in Jeffersontown in which one person was shot. [WLKY]

Oh, great, the NYC gays are trying to make Kim Davis a thing again. They apparently don’t realize that you’re not supposed to throw water on the damn Gremlins or whatever. CALM DOWN, BEYONCE, LET THE MONSTER STAY IN HER REDNECK CAVE! [HuffPo]

The Metropolitan Sewer District has taken 5 1/2 percent hikes every year. This year, MSD wants a 20 percent increase – the largest in almost a decade. The rate hike, which would need approval from the Louisville Metro Council, had us questioning what the money will pay for and how much your bill would go up. [WAVE3]

Shouts of “Shame, shame, shame,” erupted in the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday as Republican lawmakers narrowly defeated legislation to protect the civil rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees of government contractors. [Reuters]

Justin Schmidt grabbed some pizza and took a seat against the wall. It felt good to rest his legs. [WFPL]

When the ball dropped in Times Square on Jan. 1 of this year, more than half of the country disapproved of the job that President Obama was doing, according to Gallup. That boded poorly for the Democrats over the course of the year; presidential approval correlates to both how his party fares in the presidential race (even if he’s not on the ticket) but also to the results of Senate races. An unpopular Obama suggested a less popular whoever-was-about-to-win-the-Democratic-nomination. [WaPo]

Humana Inc. has learned a lot about Louisville over the past year — it knows our major health problems are diabetes, behavioral health and respiratory conditions, and it’s starting to understand why. [Business First]

Now that building permits are temporarily frozen in Charlestown’s business district, one business owner hoping to develop property said he’s looking at his options, which he said could include legal action. [News & Tribune]

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At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Drama Must Just Be Never-Ending

Approximately $1.7 million is being cut by Jefferson County Public Schools by eliminating 25 central office positions, according to new information obtained through an open records request. [WDRB]

Former Metro Council President David Tandy has been hired by one of Louisville’s oldest and largest law firms as an attorney and lobbyist who will be tasked with finding opportunities for emerging minority and women-owned companies. [C-J/AKN]

From Safari and TeensConnect camps at the Louisville Zoo, to Summer Reading and the annual Cultural Pass, Louisville is offering dozens of programs designed to keep students’ minds and bodies active during the summer break, Mayor Greg Fischer announced. [WHAS11]

The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications. [H-L]

Another day, another shooting or two. Police are investigating two shootings blocks apart in the Parkland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Two Boston brothers accused of urinating on and beating a homeless Mexican man and telling police “Donald Trump was right: All these illegals need to be deported,” were sentenced to prison on Monday, prosecutors said. [HuffPo]

A same-sex couple is accusing the Archdiocese of Louisville of discriminating against them after Catholic Cemeteries denied the design for their joint tombstone. [WAVE3]

Data released Friday by the Major Cities Chiefs Police Association, based on reports from more than 60 cities, showed notable increases in murders in about two dozen cities in the first three months of the year compared to last year and a 9 percent increase nationwide. [NY Times]

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin says the commonwealth has a lot in its favor when it comes to attracting manufacturers. [WFPL]

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived. [The Intercept]

They’re people with advanced degrees who hail from all over the world, and they are relocating to Louisville. [Business First]

Floyd County finances improved by $878,000 Tuesday night. But what happens to that money was the main topic of discussion at the monthly Floyd County Council meeting. [News & Tribune]