Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Will JCPS Have A Scandal-Free Week?

It appears Jefferson County Public Schools wants to move forward with plans to centralize the district’s application and acceptance process for its magnet schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether public schools could force all students to submit to random drug testing, as Louisville’s private Trinity High School has decided to do. But constitutional experts say it is unlikely the court would allow such testing at public schools, unless there was a suspicion that individual students were using drugs. [C-J/AKN]

Almost a week after an incredible Derby race, another amazing event took place at Churchill Downs Friday afternoon. Just before Race 7, a mile-long turf race, a horse broke out of the starting gate and managed to dump it’s jockey. [WHAS11]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police say a worker at an aluminum plant has been killed in an accident. [WLKY]

The urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. [HuffPo]

A local mother is fired up after she says her rights were violated when she was told she couldn’t breastfeed in an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday defended his support for a measure in the USA Patriot Act that has anchored a National Security Agency program to collect Americans’ phone data. [Reuters]

The total number of homeless residents in Louisville decreased about 14 percent in the past year, according to the 2014 Louisville Homeless Census. [WFPL]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

As the number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana continues to grow, Gov. Mike Pence signed an act meant to combat the IV drug use problem underlying the epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Tolls Will Still Hit Poorest Hardest

Scott County, Indiana, wants its needle exchange program to keep running even after the governor’s executive order expires. [WDRB]

Trinity High officials on Wednesday touted their decision to begin random drug- and alcohol-testing of their 1,200-plus students, saying the move will act as a deterrent and could help keep students from becoming addicted later in life. [C-J/AKN]

Police in Lawrence, Ind. have located a Louisville pizza delivery driver’s car that was stolen May 3. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission has approved a plan by Keeneland to move its simulcasting — betting on live horse races run elsewhere — to The Red Mile in Lexington. [H-L]

Officials approved a plan to minimize the effects of bridge tolls on low-income residents. And it won’t do much of that. [WLKY & Press Releases]

About a half-dozen states are considering cutting income taxes and simultaneously increasing sales or excise taxes — sparking debate on whether wealthier taxpayers will benefit disproportionately at the expense of those living on lower incomes. [HuffPo]

Ignore the bit where Connie Leonard snidely uses “Democrat” as an adjective. A lot of taxpayers are up in arms over recent home assessments in Metro Louisville. That’s because in many cases, assessed values jumped much higher than homeowners expected and certain neighborhoods are in more sticker shock than others. [WAVE3]

A federal appeals court panel ruled on Thursday that the NSA’s bulk collection of metadata of phone calls to and from Americans is not authorized by Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act, throwing out the government’s legal justification for the surveillance program exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden nearly two years ago. [The Intercept]

Louisville Metro Council members are scrutinizing new property assessments that, in some neighborhoods, have spiked by as much as 40 or even 150 percent. [WFPL]

Three men campaigning to lead the state of Kentucky faced potential voters Wednesday night in Booth Auditorium at the University of Pikeville. [WYMT]

Over the years, Papa John’s International Inc. has added a few non-pizza foods to its menu, including chicken wings, a giant chocolate chip cookie and, most recently, garlic knots. [Business First]

Democratic incumbent Jeff Gahan defeated challenger David White by almost 700 votes, or 60 percent to 39 percent, in the New Albany mayoral primary Tuesday. [News & Tribune]

Why Is Bullitt County Still So Awful?

Kentucky State Police are now investigating the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.Shelter employee Delsie Williams says Kentucky State Police came to her Mt. Washington home on Monday afternoon with a search warrant. She says they took her cell phone, hard drive, laptops, desktop computers and other items. Her attorney tells WDRB he’s still trying to figure out the reason. [WDRB]

The city’s codes and regulations department hit Louisville metro government with a “public nuisance” violation for a piece of property it owns. In a Jan. 23 notice, a city inspector found the historic Colonial Garden sites in south Louisville had “several rotten structural beams” and that “all exterior surfaces need to be put into good repair.” [C-J/AKN]

A fundraiser will take place Wednesday at Spinelli’s Pizzeria in Downtown Louisville for an employee who was stabbed while delivering pizza to Norton Hospital. [WHAS11]

Kentucky has taken steps to prohibit electioneering on public property within 100 feet of polling places for the May 19 primary election. [H-L]

Visitation will be held Thursday for U.S. District Judge John Heyburn. [WLKY]

Food stamp recipients are more likely to be obese than the general population, according to new research from the federal government. [HuffPo]

The childhood home of Muhammad Ali will be restored, it’s new owner promises. George Bochetto, an attorney from Philadelphia, has bought half of the home and now shares ownership with real estate investor, Jared Weiss, of Las Vegas. [WAVE3]

Last year’s bid to undo Obama’s immigration actions deemed a failure, time to move on to other priorities. [Politico]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is seeking residents’ input on the shaping of the district’s five-year strategic plan. [WFPL]

Parents worry about a child getting a concussion in the heat of competition, but they also need to be thinking about what happens during practices, a study finds. High school and college football players are more likely to suffer a concussion during practices than in a game, according a study published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. [NPR]

Back in September, Sweden-based AB Electrolux announced plans to acquire GE Appliances, a Louisville-based division of General Electric Co., for $3.3 billion. At the time, officials with both companies speculated that the transaction would close in 2015, after making its way through the regulatory process. [Business First]

With eyes on the six months ahead, Mayor Mike Moore and City Councilman Dennis Julius are poised to battle for the mayor’s seat in November. [News & Tribune]

At Least It Moved To Cordish Central

Remember the Louisville “purge” nonsense? Now it’s a thing in Baltimore — where Cordish is headquartered. [Baltimore Sun]

They are family homes, but they’re being used like extended stay hotels in neighborhoods where that was never the plan. Now, new rules regulating boarding houses in Louisville are aiming to put a stop to it. [WDRB]

Meanwhile, we give away MILLIONS to Cordish for doing nothing. The Louisville Metro Public Health and Wellness Department is eliminating half of its clinics serving residents in the Women, Infants and Children nutrition program because of a projected $800,000 budget shortfall this year. [C-J/AKN]

When Tess Graham, 64, looks in the mirror these days she sees the female she’s also felt she was inside. “I waited 55 years to see me. That is a long time,” Graham said. [WHAS11]

Trying to pry information out of professional chauffeur T.J. Doyle is harder than wrestling a winning trifecta ticket out of a poor man’s hand. [H-L]

A Louisville elementary school got some big-name recognition when Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear visited to celebrate the school reaching an environmental milestone. [WLKY]

This highly entertaining pothole move is hilarious. It’s a shame it hasn’t happened in Louisville. [HuffPo]

All the pageantry and tradition of Derby week really boils down to one thing: the incredible athletic talent of 20 horses that reach the starting gate on the first Saturday in May. Kentucky loves its horses, and the Derby horses are some of the best treated around. But the Bluegrass is also home to many people who are working to better the lives of other horses that don’t have it anywhere near as good. [WAVE3]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

The Kentucky Public Service Commission was scheduled to hold a hearing on Tuesday on Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ proposed rate increase. [WFPL]

A Kentucky judge has validated a printing company’s discrimination against an LGBT group under the state’s “Religious Freedom Restoration Act” (RFRA). [Think Progress]

Louisville-based Baptist Healthcare System Inc., operator of Baptist Health Louisville and several other hospitals across the state, plans to expand its corporate headquarters on Eastpoint Parkway in Louisville in the coming years. [Business First]

The space the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center’s museum exhibits once occupied now is a labyrinth of metal frames and stacks of drywall. A cacophony of clanging metal on metal and shrieking power tools overwhelms the senses there now, but it won’t be too long before a different sound fills the air. [News & Tribune]

Don’t forget to enter to win a copy of Lawn Darts of Fate! Contest runs through the end of the week. [Page One & The ‘Ville Voice]