Been To The Falls? No? JUST GO!

It was not icy roads but a strong odor that people in Southern Indiana were complaining about on Monday morning. Most people say it smelled like propane or natural gas but emergency officials don’t think it’s anything that hazardous. [WDRB]

Standing in front of dozens of Jefferson County Public Schools principals, the district’s chief business officer acknowledged that JCPS has done a “horrible job of communicating” its proposed budget changes that could cut hundreds of thousands of dollars from some schools’ budgets. [C-J/AKN]

An exhibit featuring family photographs of Anne Frank has opened at Louisville Free Public Library and continues through Feb. 27. [WHAS11]

Virginia Kraft Payson’s conviction has won more battles than any list of her achievements can do justice to, whether it documenting outdoor exploits as a journalist for Sports Illustrated or crafting bloodlines as one of Thoroughbred racing’s most noted owner/breeders. [H-L]

Two years ago, WLKY did a story on T.J. Floyd — a young boy who suffers with what’s called an invisible injury. [WLKY]

Solar is the energy employer of the future — or at least that’s how the numbers look today. A new report on the state of the solar industry out Tuesday from the nonprofit Solar Foundation shows that the number of jobs in the United States in the solar industry outpaced those in the oil and gas industries for the first time ever. [HuffPo]

Parents and principals showed up at Monday’s board meeting to express concern for budget allocations that aim to make Jefferson County Public Schools a more equitable school system by shifting funding between schools. [WAVE3]

The EPA’s own advisory board says the agency needs to clarify its findings on fracking. [ThinkProgress]

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee joined the field for the Kentucky Republican presidential caucus before the Thursday deadline, bringing the total of candidates to 11. [WFPL]

Of course Matt Bevin is the butt of national jokes. Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has notified U.S. authorities that he plans to dismantle the state’s health insurance exchange created under the Obama Administration’s Affordable Care Act. [Reuters]

Louisville-based Crossdock Development is at it again in Jeffersonvile’s River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Holly Kelley and her family were among the first to experience the new interactive exhibits in the Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at its reopening Friday. [News & Tribune]

Out-Of-Control Local Media Hype

There was a definitely-not-rare shooting in Louisville yesterday and everyone at WDRB lost their damn mind. Education reporter Toni Konz was there with bells on, scaring the shit out of her teenage followers. All because it was a slow news day. [WDRB]

Congress has effectively lifted the nation’s longstanding ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs, which allow intravenous drug addicts to trade dirty syringes for clean ones in the hopes of preventing disease. [C-J/AKN]

The folks at WHAS11 weren’t quite as bad when it came to freaking out over the shooting. That station is no longer run by a delusional teabagger, so it’s the least hype-y station in town. [WHAS11]

A proliferation of threats at schools across the state has officials working with police to determine best responses and prevention techniques. [H-L]

WLKY was also beside itself with the shooting coverage. Just not quite as insane as WDRB. [WLKY]

The economy generated almost 300,000 jobs last year and cut the nominal unemployment rate to five percent. But family incomes for most people are still deeply depressed. [HuffPo]

Don’t worry, WAVE3 also got in on the shooting hype action. The tea people in charge there made sure they hyped it up plenty. [WAVE3]

Swedish home appliance maker Electrolux said on Monday its CEO Keith McLoughlin would retire and be replaced by senior executive Jonas Samuelson, just a month after the biggest deal in the company’s history collapsed. [Reuters]

This is what happens when people like WDRB’s education reporter hype the hell out of something, keeping people scared. Sure, she and her colleagues freak out when their actions are questioned, but they’re still to blame. CALM DOWN BEYONCE! [WFPL]

In 10 months, Americans will go to the polls to pick the next U.S. president. When they cast their ballots, those votes will likely hinge on how they feel about the issues most important to them. But what are those issues? [NPR]

A pair of creditors is looking to force the troubled Bullitt Utilities Inc. into Chapter 7 bankruptcy, claiming it is their best hope of getting paid what they’re owed. [Business First]

Indiana politics are just as dumb as Kentucky politics. The first meeting the New Albany City Council in 2016 had little drama, except for one announcement from the councilman who is beginning his fifth term. [News & Tribune]

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Council’s Following Frankfort Off A Cliff

The principal at a top performing JCPS school is concerned about losing teachers. [WDRB]

In a stunning move, Democrat David Tandy said Tuesday he will not seek a fourth term and will forgo a bid to serve a second consecutive term as Metro Council president. Most political observers were the opposite of stunned. Tandy’s been attacked the past year by the Stumbo Democrats – the anti-progressives who learned how to play dirty at the hands of David Yates, Stumbo’s former deputy. On top of that, Tandy has a history of running from fights. Reference: Cordish, everything Abramson ever tried, nearly everything the corrupt Jim King pushed. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another murder in Compassionate City. Nothing’s new in 2016. [WHAS11]

Mitch McConnell says a Republican takeover of the statehouse is inevitable. He’s right. But it’ll only last a few years. [H-L]

Making an already difficult system worse. TARC will be adjusting service on seven bus routes beginning Jan. 31. Most of the service changes involve minor adjustments to pick-up times in response to traffic conditions and delays. [WLKY]

Of course Indiana bigots want to fine transgendered individuals for using the “wrong” restroom. [HuffPo]

There’s a new rally cry to help prevent juveniles from getting into trouble late at night. Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad has been asking for a curfew law that is easier for officers to enforce for nearly two years. Now, Louisville Metro Council Members are asking questions. [WAVE3]

A foreclosure case involving Land of Tomorrow Productions LLC, the company that owns the Funtown Mountain property in Cave City, is moving forward, according to action taken during Barren Circuit Court on Monday morning. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Just what Louisville needs, another Greg Fischer protege! [WFPL]

An emotional US President Barack Obama has unveiled new restrictions on gun purchases, saying the “constant excuses for inaction” have to stop. [BBC]

Just a few days before Christmas, the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development named a new leader it believes can march the county toward new heights. [Business First]

Clark County is soon to undergo an inventory and assessment of signs in the county, to comply with federal regulations. [News & Tribune]

Local Media Mall Freakout Rages On

Terrible that this kid was injured but HOLY HELL AT THE HYPE! This is being blown way out of proportion. Really? Hyping things up with a headline about god putting them there? This is why Louisville can’t have nice things. [WDRB]

Yes, UofL could have paid her to go away. UofL loves to pay people to go away. Look at Shirley, the former attorney, nearly everyone else who knows something and hasn’t gone to prison. [C-J/AKN]

Linda Lee was convicted of sparking several fires over a period of 18 months. [WHAS11]

Lexington is still trying really hard to be as murderous as Louisville. [H-L]

Didn’t take long for Compassionate City to get back to murder after the start of the new year. [WLKY]

White wingnut terrorists took over a federal building in Oregon and almost no mainstream media covered it. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department’s Traffic Division reports that it responded to almost 30,000 vehicle accidents in 2015. [WAVE3]

U.S. President Barack Obama is expected to announce executive actions expanding background checks on gun sales, media outlets reported on Thursday, citing people familiar with White House proposals and planning. [Reuters]

If you ignore the bullshit mall hype being pushed by WDRB for a minute – the disgusting white flight panic, approved by Bill Lamb and his team as if it is in any way helping this city – you’ll find thoughtful commentary from people who aren’t losing their damn minds. People who were actually there. [WFPL]

Why is Middle America killing itself? The fact itself is probably the most important social science finding in years. It is already reshaping American politics. The Post’s Jeff Guo notes that the people who make up this cohort are “largely responsible for Donald Trump’s lead in the race for the Republican nomination for president.” The key question is why, and exploring it provides answers that suggest that the rage dominating U.S. politics will only get worse. [WaPo]

Rucker Todd, founding partner of the law firm that became Frost Brown Todd LLC, died on Dec. 25 at age 92. [Business First]

After more than three months, the City of New Albany turned over financial records from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter to the News and Tribune. [News & Tribune]

NYE Dept Of Awful Update Stuff

Louisville International Airport is filling four out of five available airplane seats, the highest rate since at least 2007. [WDRB]

We can’t keep track of all the UofL scandals these days! Two former University of Louisville biosafety employees who lost their jobs last year following federal investigations of biological safety practices have filed a federal lawsuit against the university, claiming repeated violations of health and safety regulations and an attempted cover-up by university officials. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Get a grip, Julie Raque Adams, and quit it with the fear mongering. It’s like you want to lose your state senate seat. [WHAS11]

Kentucky child welfare officials place too many children with mental health problems in institutions for too long when they could be better served by relatives or foster families, according to a leading child advocacy group. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The family of a teenager charged with murder in the death of another teen said they want the truth to come out. [WLKY]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Leave it to Louisville teevee folks to continue the Mall St. Matthews freak out. [WAVE3]

When officers take the lives of those they are sworn to protect and serve, they undermine their own legitimacy. [The Atlantic]

A prominent member of Louisville’s Board of Zoning Adjustment and Planning Commission has resigned his positions. [WFPL]

Open data has contributed to dramatic improvements in a wide array of fields over the past few decades, affecting how we look at astronomy, genetics, climate change, sports and more. But until recently, crime has gone without the open analysis prevalent in other fields because crime data has been closely held by law enforcement agencies and has usually only been released in bulk at monthly, quarterly or annual intervals. [FiveThirtyEight]

When most of the assets of the Sam Swope Auto Group were sold to a Florida company earlier this year, the purchase price was not disclosed. But now we at least know the price of the bulk of the real estate involved. [Business First]

Counties in Southern Indiana are working on securing a grant that would help strengthen partnerships between local manufacturing industries and their workforces. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Go To The Falls Visitor Center! It’s A Hidden Gem In The Metro

It seems the fight is over for a seat on Jeffersonville’s City Council, but that hasn’t stopped one candidate from throwing some verbal punches. [WDRB]

Oh, god, Lynn Winter is at it again. It’s time for Louisville to move on. Living in the past is not working. [C-J/AKN]

The warm winter that we have been seeing is bad for business in Paoli, Indiana. [WHAS11]

Fewer people in the state are getting their GED because of more rigorous standards and the move to a computer-based test, according to a report released Tuesday by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

Thursday marks the third anniversary of the fatal Christmas Eve attack on a young man in west Louisville. [WLKY]

The federal government’s case against the man suspected of helping the San Bernardino shooters would be weaker if the NRA and other gun rights groups had their way in court. [HuffPo]

It’s absolutely terrible that this guy got shot. But his claim not to know why he was shot? Really? Sure, it could be an accident here in Compassionate City because there’s a new gun murder every five seconds. Just unlikely the son of a high-profile attorney doesn’t know why he got shot. [WAVE3]

With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. [ThinkProgress]

Norton Healthcare and the University of Louisville have released the details of the agreement the parties reached Friday to settle an ongoing dispute over Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WFPL]

The Pittsburgh City Council on Monday voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, falling in line with a growing number of municipalities that have taken similar actions in recent years, city officials said. Meanwhile, Kentucky twiddles its thumbs. [Reuters]

The city of Louisville has green-lighted a contract with CTC Consultants in order to chart how to best connect Louisville to the KentuckyWired fiber optic Internet cable network. [Business First]

Visitors to the new Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center at and after its grand reopening Jan. 8 can expect an immersive learning experience as they travel through the history of the falls and the affects and relation to the region. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]