Really? Move The VA To The West End?

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The East End Bridge is not just for cars and trucks. It’s made with bicycles in mind, too. There is a multi-use path on one side of the long-anticipated bridge. [WDRB]

If Aetna and Humana eventually are permitted to consummate a $37 billion sale deal, their lawyers must convince a federal judge that the companies’ plans to shed health insurance business in several states will keep competition alive. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s some actual press release stenography. Louisville is receiving a $29.5 million implementation grant through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Choice Neighborhoods Initiative program. [WHAS11]

What will Donald Trump’s presidency mean for Thoroughbred racing? After all, Kentucky’s horse industry could never get out of the starting gate without the immigrants he demagogued as “criminals” and “rapists” during the campaign. [Tom Eblen]

Police are investigating a shooting on the 400 block of South 10th Street. [WLKY]

President-elect Donald Trump distinguished himself on the campaign trail as the rare Republican candidate promising not to cut Social Security and Medicare. [HuffPo]

Plans to build a new veterans hospital in West Louisville continues to get support from around the community. [WAVE3]

American intelligence agencies have concluded with “high confidence” that Russia acted covertly in the latter stages of the presidential campaign to harm Hillary Clinton’s chances and promote Donald J. Trump, according to senior administration officials. [NY Times]

A Louisville Metro Council committee will spend Tuesday afternoon discussing how to spend the city’s projected budget surplus. [WFPL]

The dangerous myth that Hillary Clinton ignored the working class. To many white Trump voters, the problem wasn’t her economic stance, but the larger vision—a multi-ethnic social democracy—that it was a part of. [The Atlantic]

A 16-acre business park spread across five buildings on River Road has sold to a partnership between Louisville-based The Hocker Group LLC and Hollenbach-Oakley LLC. [Business First]

Health officials in Indiana say the bull that tested positive for Anthrax last week is not a threat to public safety, nor has it entered the food supply. [News & Tribune]

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Another Compassionate, Deadly Weekend In Possibility City

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Nicole Cowherd’s husband, Charles Cowherd, was killed nearly six months ago. With the number of homicides growing in the city every week she worries her husband’s case is being put on the back burner. [WDRB]

Health benefits for retired union coal miners will not expire Dec. 31 under a compromise nearing a final vote in Congress, but coal country lawmakers say the deal is unacceptable because it is temporary and does nothing to address a related shortfall in the miners’ pension fund. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police is investigating a homicide over in the 1900 block of Ivy Ridge Lane. That is not far from Manslick Road near the Gene Snyder. [WHAS11]

Hey, Paul Prather: get fucked. You’ve spent years whitewashing discrimination, homophobia and excusing this hateful bullshit under the guise of Jesus. Really, get fucked, you old, white shitsack. [H-L]

Three people were shot Sunday morning at a University of Louisville student housing apartment complex. [WLKY]

President-elect Donald Trump is expected to pick Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson, who has ties to Russia, to be his secretary of state, several media outlets reported Saturday. [HuffPo]

One person was killed in a shooting Saturday night in the Fairdale area, according to LMPD public information officer, Dwight Mitchell. [WAVE3]

Go watch Congressman John Yarmuth, the incoming ranking member of the House Budget Committee, discuss future budgets under Cheeto Jesus. [C-SPAN]

Maybe if people like Keith Runyon hadn’t spent years allowing Democrats to eat their own, ignoring scandal in his own liberal back yard, we wouldn’t be in this position with a manchild as governor. [WFPL]

The CIA has concluded in a secret assessment that Russia intervened in the 2016 election to help Donald Trump win the presidency, rather than just to undermine confidence in the U.S. electoral system, according to officials briefed on the matter. [WaPo]

Shares of Louisville-based Humana Inc. are down about 2 percent on Wall Street this afternoon after the company announced that it was adjusting earnings per share guidance because of a recent court decision. [Business First]

As Floyd County’s Veterans Service Officer, Glen Hammack is on a mission to let fellow veterans know there’s help for them when they re-enter the civilian world. [News & Tribune]

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Another Disastrous Week For UofL

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Let’s all roll our eyes at this non-story about Jefferson County Public Schools. Way to continually hype up what is typically nonsense. Jefferson County Public Schools has fired a teacher for using sick leave while she went on a cruise in October. [WDRB]

One year after the University of Louisville placed two top administrators on leave with pay after the disclosure they were under investigation by the FBI, the university has paid them more than $1 million — enough to pay in-state tuition for about 90 students. [C-J/AKNs]

On Thursday Bernheim Forest completed the purchase of 162 acres from a longtime Bullitt County farmer and businessman as part of a forest expansion [WHAS11]

A bill to keep the government funded through the end of April does not include a provision that would have made it easier for the horse racing industry to hire foreign guest workers who groom horses and perform other jobs. [H-L]

A new Louisville Metro Police Department unit, aimed at improving community relationships, was formed last month. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama opened up about racism he faced throughout his presidency in an interview with CNN’s Fareed Zakaria on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Here’s even more terrible coverage about charter schools. You’ll never see a legitimate deep-dive from local television folks. [WAVE3]

Gen. Michael Hayden, a former head of the NSA and CIA, says he’s worried about Donald Trump’s understanding of cybersecurity. [The Hill]

As Republicans assume a new majority in the upcoming legislative session, the Louisville-area chamber of commerce wants the Kentucky General Assembly to pass legislation long stymied by Democrats. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court was something of an under-the-radar issue in the 2016 campaign, extremely important to some groups (especially white evangelicals), but not discussed all that much on a national level. But now that Donald Trump has been elected, and with the success of the GOP’s only-Republican-presidents-are-allowed-to-fill-vacancies strategy, it will be of tremendous importance to the country’s future. [WaPo]

The Kentucky Court of Appeals ordered Porter Bancorp Inc. (NASDAQ: PBIB) the Louisville-based parent company of PBI Bank, to pay more than $10 million to Signature Point Condominiums LLC, Signature Point Apartments LLC and Signature Point KTC. [Business First]

As Carrier employees in Indianapolis learned the jobs they thought were lost to Mexico were actually saved, employees at the Manitowoc Beverage Services Inc. plant in Sellersburg speculated that President-elect Donald Trump might keep theirs in the United States, too. [News & Tribune]

Thank Bevin For The UofL Hot Mess

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Families in need get the gift of free clothes, but only for a few hours. [WDRB]

Attorney General Andy Beshear said Wednesday that Gov. Matt Bevin alone caused the University of Louisville to be put on probation by the school’s accrediting agency, and only Bevin can address the problem by backing off his orders revamping the university board of trustees. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! “Over at our campus, we are tired of it. We’re tired of all the rhetoric,” U of L Athletic Director Tom Jurich said about the proposed amended funding ordinance for the Yum! Center up for consideration with the Metro Council. [WHAS11]

State Rep. Tim Couch, R-Hyden, republished fake news stories on his Facebook page this week alleging that President Obama’s daughters, Malia and Sasha, are adopted, and suggesting that the president is gay and his wife, first lady Michelle Obama, is a transgender man. [H-L]

Celebrating successes and looking to the future were the main themes at the annual Youth Build Breakfast. [WLKY]

The Pakistani government on Wednesday released a description of a phone call between Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and U.S. President-elect Donald Trump that gave global media and Trump-watchers a lot to chuckle about. [HuffPo]

MSD broke ground on the $60 million Shawnee Park Basin Project on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

When Matt Bevin and his crew of revisionist historians attempt to claim he’s great for education, remember this. Kentucky passed a plan to offer tuition-free community college, but Gov. Matt Bevin has delayed putting the program in place until next year. [CHE]

The air beneath the Big Four Bridge Saturday afternoon was for a moment filled with drum beats and smoke from burning sage. [WFPL]

In a move signaling an assault on President Obama’s climate change and environmental legacy, President-elect Donald Trump will nominate Scott Pruitt, the attorney general of the oil and gas intensive state of Oklahoma, to head the Environmental Protection Agency. [WaPo]

Paint the city red? Like it’s not already red from the blood of countless gun murders? [HEAD-DESK]

A local nonprofit organization that focuses on empowering underprivileged women soon will open its first retail location in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

It was good ole fashioned campfire storytelling that led Tom Netherton to write his first book. [News & Tribune]

Your Morning Dept Of Awful Extremes

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Louisville is launching a new plan of attack against the city’s deadly heroin epidemic. [WDRB]

A “big, big change” is proposed for the busy St. Matthews-Eline library branch at City Hall and also for the rest of the building – the former Greathouse Elementary School – under a planned $4.5 million renovation and expansion project that could get started early next year. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This accounted for SEVEN (7) of the top stories for this station yesterday. Literally – seven. One lane of Shelby and East Broadway is expected to be shut down for a week due to a crash causing a partial building collapse. [WHAS11]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The review of Louisville Metro’s fiscal year budget brings some possible good news to the Louisville Metro Police Department. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

Work still has yet to begin on cleaning up a contaminated industrial site in Louisville’s Park Hill neighborhood. [WFPL]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

It’s like Coopers’ Craft bourbon, but it’s in pie form. [Business First]

Lauren Powell said she and her husband have had plans of starting a livestock farm with pigs and other animals on their 14-acre property near Russiaville. But a pet pig? That was never on their radar. [News & Tribune]

Maybe Don’t Ignore Frankfort Republicans

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Guess we can look forward to months and months of breathless regurgitation from this station’s education reporter on the charter schools front, right? Hopefully WDRB won’t rely on its teabagger staffers to assign stories so the public will get some actual deep-dives on what charters could mean for Jefferson County Public Schools. [WDRB]

Gunmen exchanged about 20 shots at an annual Thanksgiving Day football event, thrusting Louisville past its homicide record and into the national spotlight. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Of course the report was buried in a release the day before Thanksgiving – that’s how Greg Fischer STILL allows his staff to operate. A Metro Councilwoman criticized the timing of a report showing a multiple Louisville agencies failed to communicate with each other leading to the deadly South 28th Street building collapse. [WHAS11]

Like many students, Tyler Allen spent his college days enthusiastically experimenting with alcohol. Only for Allen, it turned into a habit that was more than recreational. [H-L]

Sucks that the guy got killed but can you imagine how much could be accomplished in Kentucky if we weren’t wasting time on constantly renaming roads, bridges and buildings? [WLKY]

Democrats on the House Oversight Committee on Monday asked the committee’s chairman, Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), to look into President-elect Donald Trump’s financial entanglements and make sure he’s not breaking the law. [HuffPo]

Homicide detectives with the Louisville Metro Police Department are investigating the death of a man found shot Monday morning. [WAVE3]

The Republican Party long insisted that the troubles of the inner city were cultural—but rather than apply the same logic to struggling blue-collar communities, Trump blamed their problems on external forces. [The Atlantic]

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms. The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Imagine how different things could be if Chris Hartman were permitted by the Fairness board over the past seven or eight years, as I have pushed, to spend time with these extremists trying to educate them. Kentucky would be in a much better spot than it is today. [WFPL]

You don’t get a pat on the back for ratcheting down from rabid after exploiting that very radicalism to your advantage. Unrepentant opportunism belies a staggering lack of character and caring that can’t simply be vanquished from memory. [NY Times]

Kroger Co. rates among the retailers doing the least to cut out the use of toxic chemicals, according to a new study completed by a group that aims to protect families from harmful chemicals. [Business First]

In the interest of preventing stagnation in downtown Jeffersonville, the city council approved a new zoning district that in part raises the maximum residential building height to 100 feet. [News & Tribune]

Ugh. Another Deadly Thanksgiving.

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At least two people are dead after reports of multiple shootings at Shawnee Park [yesterday] afternoon. [WDRB]

Louisville Gas and Electric’s new rate proposal attempts to shift all of its fixed costs for residential electricity service to a regular monthly fee, a move that drew outcries from advocates for the poor and supporters of the area’s fledgling solar industry. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This story will make your eyes roll back in your head. The level of disconnect as it relates to Metro Animal Services is absurd. [WHAS11]

The Fayette County Coroner’s Office is asking for the public’s help as they search for the relatives of a woman who died Sunday. [H-L]

A store owner called police after one of his regular customers was shot. [WLKY]

Reminder – coal is dead/dying and it is never going to be a great thing for Kentucky again. Never. Canada plans to phase out most coal-powered electricity plants by 2030, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna announced Monday. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Volindah Costabell has lived in the Highlands for 30 years. She’s siding with the Original Highland Neighborhood Association. [WAVE3]

An Estill County citizens group is taking legal action against three state entities. The organization wants more information on the state’s response to the illegal dumping of low-level radioactive waste in the county landfill. [WEKU]

Louisville’s more than 2,000 nonprofits have accounted for $10.6 billion in annual revenue over the past year, according to a new study by the Center for Nonprofit Excellence. [WFPL]

Even a well known story depends on where you begin to tell it. In the summer of 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African-American boy visiting Mississippi, was lynched by white men who said he’d flirted with a white woman. Till’s body was returned home to Chicago where his mother insisted on an open casket. Photos were wired around the globe and the world saw his mutilated body. His murderers would be free within a month. [NPR]

A panel of Humana, Kindred, UPS and automotive executives explored ways the companies are trying to attract and retain talent. [Business First]

The house at 1218 E. Oak St. should have already fallen to the ground. For years it was in a state of disrepair and was ready for the wrecking ball. [News & Tribune]