Bob Hill Seems Frustrated These Days

From the end of his driveway, Bob Hill can hear the hum of construction work. He lives close enough to the four-lane highway taking shape that he can see it when a line of trees thins for the winter. [WDRB]

An assault case in Jefferson Circuit Court was dismissed Tuesday by a judge who ruled an assistant commonwealth’s attorney “altered” evidence that was “deliberately not disclosed and concealed” from the defense counsel. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner American Pharoah will retire and breed here in Kentucky. [WHAS11]

If Matt Bevin’s ignorance and code words leave you with a bitter taste in your mouth, you’re not alone. [H-L]

In newly released audio statements, an Olmsted Academy North student told police that he was choked so hard by a school resource officer that he could barely breathe and had blurry vision. [WLKY]

It wasn’t that the intelligence community was giving the administration wholesale faulty intelligence. It was that the administration was lying to the American people about what the intelligence actually showed. [HuffPo]

The mayor of Goshen has resigned, a city representative said Wednesday. Earlier in the day, an email apparently from Mayor Bob Thacker was sent to residents saying that members of a neighborhood watch Facebook group – which the email referred to as “The Disease” – had crossed a line, mentioning the mayor’s wife and children in online posts. [WAVE3]

States lack accurate statistics on widespread heroin use. [NPR]

The Louisville Department of Public Health and Wellness is conducting the 2015 Community Health Needs Assessment survey to help the department and local hospitals determine which programs, policies and services will lead to a healthier Louisville. [WFPL & Survey]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Wednesday announced the results of a four-state crackdown aimed at stopping illegal distribution of addictive prescription medicines, such as opioid painkillers, that yielded 280 arrests. [Reuters]

Work on The Outlet Shoppes of the Bluegrass’s expansion is well under way, but just how much will the 53,400-square-foot addition cost? [Business First]

The preliminary $119 million plan to revamp, rebuild and realign several Greater Clark County Schools would result in an additional $13.74 cents per $100 of assessed property valuation for 2016 property taxes, the district superintendent told school board members Tuesday night. [News & Tribune]

Thank Goodness The Primary’s Over

The company that owns Churchill Downs is suing the Daily Racing Form, alleging the publication’s online wagering service illegally took bets on races at the Louisville track during Kentucky Derby weekend. [WDRB]

You might say Louisville is more flabby than fit. The American College of Sports Medicine has again ranked the area near the bottom for fitness among the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas in its just-released 2015 American Fitness Index, which combines health behaviors, rates of chronic health problems and community indicators such as recreational facilities and farmers’ markets. [C-J/AKN]

Package-delivery giant UPS will pay more than $25 million to settle charges it submitted false claims to the federal government in connection with delivery of Next Day Air overnight packages, the Department of Justice said Tuesday. [WHAS11]

You should check out this interactive map of last night’s vote results from across Kentucky. [H-L]

The teevee folks claimed no problems were reported while voting yesterday even after the Office of the Attorney General issued press releases listing the number of calls regarding problems per county. [WLKY]

After hearing story after story from voters on the campaign trail about heroin’s toll, Hillary Clinton instructed her policy team to draw up solutions to the burgeoning opiate epidemic. [HuffPo]

JCPS is really good at being awful when it comes to buses. A parent of a Jefferson County Public Schools student is suing the district, claiming a school bus dragged his son along a St. Matthews road in 2013. [WAVE3]

Kentucky hates old people. States with at least 40 percent of homes ranked on the bottom two rungs include North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. [Newsweek]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ Audit Committee has approved giving a Louisville auditing firm a $65,000 contract to see through changes to tighten the university’s financial controls and make it less prone to fraud. [WFPL]

Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren’t overweight, a U.S. study suggests. [Reuters]

Humana Inc. is continuing its commitment to hire an average of 500 veterans and military spouses each year. [Business First]

Though the closure is only expected to last until construction is completed on the new Farmers Market pavilion, some business owners chided the city for shutting down a second block of Bank Street so that vendors could set up booths. [News & Tribune]

How’ll That Waterfront Property End Up?

Have you seen this puppies and rainbows b.s. with Donna Hargens? Giving this woman a free pass is the last thing Louisville needs right now. [WDRB]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has ordered 988 body cameras from Arizona-based TASER International ahead of its upcoming body camera pilot program, the department confirmed Tuesday. [C-J/AKN]

It’s a building and a company that dominates the downtown Louisville skyline and the city’s business community. For more than five decades, the healthcare giant Humana and its employees have remained an important piece of this area’s economic fabric. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader endorsed Hal Heiner over Jamie Comer, which is likely to push Comer over the edge behind closed doors. [H-L]

Researchers say children in Louisville are being sold for sex. The KristyLove Foundation is a first-of-its-kind shelter in Louisville created by a woman who escaped the sex trade and turned her heartbreak into healing. [WLKY]

Faith in humanity, restored. A worker in a Qdoba fast food restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky was caught on video feeding a customer who was unable to feed herself. [HuffPo]

A Louisville police chief says there’s a lot of work to be done to ease tensions between law enforcement and the community. He believes body cameras could be part of the answer. [WAVE3]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Waterfront Development Corp. wants two of its downtown properties just south of Waterfront Park to be developed. The agency asked on Thursday for development proposals for the properties. [WFPL]

Ha! Daniel Grossberg has an ad highlighting Jacob Conway’s blackmail/extortion/threat attempt. [Click the Clicky]

American Pharaoh strolled out of his trailer and into the stables with ease when he arrived at Pimlico Race Course Wednesday afternoon. [Business First]

The Floyd County Council voted 5-2 last week to cut $150,000 from the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter budget to help balance the county’s 2015 general fund. That won’t end well. [News & Tribune]

Louisville Loves Cutting TARC Routes

TARC is asking for the public’s opinion about possibly cutting service on three of its busiest routes. [WDRB]

Clarksville Community Schools — which Superintendent Kimberly Knott called “the neediest school district in Southern Indiana” — stands to lose more than $500,000 under Indiana’s new budget, which was signed last week by Gov. Mike Pence and introduces changes to the school funding formula. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway is suing Marathon Petroleum Corp. over high gas prices. The 2015 gubernatorial candidate filed the complaint Tuesday with the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky – one week ahead of the state’s primary election. [WHAS11]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. Judicial corruption is a big deal in the rest of the state. [H-L]

Following a heated public meeting, the Floyd County Council is holding off on a decision to cut half of the county’s animal control budget. [WLKY]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

People are freaking out because police found marijuana growing at the scene of a shooting. [WAVE3]

Jerry Abramson sends emails to the White House staff. [White House]

Public meetings begin this week to share information about Louisville’s draft assessment of the city’s urban tree canopy. [WFPL]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Indianapolis-based American Senior Communities LLC plans to build a new facility in Louisville. [Business First]

To downtown Jeffersonville resident McNeil Wynn, TARC is vital in his everyday commute to Louisville. [News & Tribune]

Convention Center Construction Will Hurt

An additional 26,000 students at 31 public schools in Jefferson County will begin receiving free breakfast and lunch this fall – regardless of their income – under a plan approved by the school board Monday night. [WDRB]

The Kentucky International Convention Center will close in August 2016 and stay shuttered for two years, while undergoing a $180 million makeover officials say is desperately needed if Louisville is to stay competitive in attracting lucrative convention and trade show business. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a beehive on the roof of the Bristol Bar and Grille in the Highlands. [WHAS11]

The Urban County Council probably will be asked by August to approve a needle-exchange program aimed at stemming growing rates of hepatitis and HIV in Fayette County. [H-L]

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Louisville Metro police are searching for dynamite stolen from a local construction site. [WLKY]

Even though some politicians claim America is a “Christian nation,” the share of the population that identifies as Christian has declined significantly in recent years. [HuffPo]

A Lyndon man dedicated his career to being a Louisville police officer. Now, he’s dedicating his retirement to making sure more than 200 years of department artifacts have a home. [WAVE3]

Viewers didn’t have to wait long for the allegations of domestic abuse to come up in the statewide, televised debate Monday night between four Republican candidates for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

The University of Louisville on Monday released a financial auditor’s review that had been kept out of the public’s eye for more than a year, the result of a court settlement with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting. [WFPL]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

StemWood Corp., a New Albany veneer and lumber mill that has operated since 1905, plans to close in the next six to eight months. [Business First]

The Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has until next week to respond to New Albany City Councilman Scott Blair’s request for a state ruling on whether he should be recognized as a member of the organization’s board. [News & Tribune]

Will JCPS Have A Scandal-Free Week?

It appears Jefferson County Public Schools wants to move forward with plans to centralize the district’s application and acceptance process for its magnet schools. [WDRB]

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether public schools could force all students to submit to random drug testing, as Louisville’s private Trinity High School has decided to do. But constitutional experts say it is unlikely the court would allow such testing at public schools, unless there was a suspicion that individual students were using drugs. [C-J/AKN]

Almost a week after an incredible Derby race, another amazing event took place at Churchill Downs Friday afternoon. Just before Race 7, a mile-long turf race, a horse broke out of the starting gate and managed to dump it’s jockey. [WHAS11]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Louisville Metro Police say a worker at an aluminum plant has been killed in an accident. [WLKY]

The urban poor in the United States are experiencing accelerated aging at the cellular level, and chronic stress linked both to income level and racial-ethnic identity is driving this physiological deterioration. [HuffPo]

A local mother is fired up after she says her rights were violated when she was told she couldn’t breastfeed in an Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Louisville. [WAVE3]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Sunday defended his support for a measure in the USA Patriot Act that has anchored a National Security Agency program to collect Americans’ phone data. [Reuters]

The total number of homeless residents in Louisville decreased about 14 percent in the past year, according to the 2014 Louisville Homeless Census. [WFPL]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

As the number of HIV cases in Southeastern Indiana continues to grow, Gov. Mike Pence signed an act meant to combat the IV drug use problem underlying the epidemic. [News & Tribune]

Council Should Always Ignore Fischer

Indiana’s riverboat casinos will now be allowed to build new facilities on land. [WDRB]

A group that has formed to raise concerns about planned Transit Authority of River City service cuts has scheduled additional public meetings to give citizens a chance to air their views about the cutbacks, primarily on three heavily used routes. [C-J/AKN]

Now Elizabethtown is trying to get in on Louisville’s pedestrian killing game. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto will recommend bringing hourly workers to a starting rate of $10 an hour, a move that would affect at least 600 workers, he announced this week. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is asking for the public’s help in identifying a man whose body was found Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

Americans generally tell their civil rights history along the following lines: At one time, white southerners were racist, very racist. They created laws to keep blacks in separate and inferior schools, kept them poor by relegating them to the lowest paying jobs, denied them the right to vote, and humiliated them with an array of petty and demeaning social customs. [HuffPo]

Police say a woman is expected to be OK after she was accidentally shot by her 2-year-old son Saturday night. [WAVE3]

Republican financier Matt Bevin can talk without notes for an hour about why he wants to be Kentucky’s next governor, easily tossing out facts to support his case for a smaller state government that does less. Some of Bevin’s facts might come especially easily because they’re not correct. [John Cheves]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Friday said all unintended consequences need to first be examined before Metro Council approves changes to the 2006 MSD Flood Plain Management Plan. Metro Council should never wait on Greg Fischer for anything. [WFPL]

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in federal funds. [NPR]

A regional collaboration in Southern Indiana is still in the running to receive funding through a new statewide program aimed at attracting more workers and businesses to the state. [Business First]

An $80 million plan to renovate and replace schools in Floyd County was defeated by more nearly 1,000 votes Tuesday. [News & Tribune]