Three Horrible Superintendents In A Row

Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens must “step up to the challenge” of leading Kentucky’s largest school district and regain the trust that has eroded in the past year, according to an annual evaluation unanimously approved by the school board Tuesday. [WDRB]

Thanks, religious extremists, for ruining hospitals everywhere when you buy them up! The state is investigating whether patient care is unsafe at University of Louisville Hospital because of staff cuts made by KentuckyOne Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s a battle over trees but for Cynthia Huber the fight has a deeper meaning. “This is not only did they lose their loved ones that they have memorialized but they’re also losing the tree in memory of that person,” she said. [WHAS11]

Welp, readers of the Herald-Leader can now look forward to a much poorer experience. The Lexington Herald-Leader announced on Monday that it will transfer its printing and packaging operations to Louisville starting in August, and that the company will put its downtown Lexington building on the market. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Jefferson County Public School board voted unanimously to approve Superintendent Donna Hargens’ 2015-2016 summative evaluation. [WLKY]

“You might think, ‘Well that is not going to happen to us in America. We’re not going to listen to some ridiculously haired buffoon, peddling lies and nativism in the hopes of riding a protest vote into power.’” Oliver said. “Well let Britain tell you, it can happen, and when it does, there are no fucking do-overs.” [HuffPo]

Photographs went viral on social media; thoroughbreds with sores on their backs, ribs showing. Hooves in need of trimming. The outcry began drawing attention from equine industry standards such as the Daily Racing Form and Blood Horse. [WAVE3]

In his final State of the Union address in January, President Obama made an ambitious pledge to overhaul the management of fossil fuels on America’s public lands in his final year, focusing, in particular, on the antiquated and little-known federal coal program. [ThinkProgress]

A new Google project to estimate solar potential has come to Louisville. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell tried to blame Democrats for refusing to fund Zika-related activities. Reality? McConnell and his friends pushed all kinds of nastiness into the legislation that they knew would keep Democrats from supporting it. Like trying to harm women and undoing confederate flag bans in federal cemeteries. [TPM]

Aetna Inc. isn’t happy with Missouri’s decision earlier this year to oppose its pending purchase of Humana Inc. [Business First]

The South Central Regional Airport Authority has received assurance of the $750,000 local match needed for the runway extension project at the Clark Regional Airport. [News & Tribune]

UofL Dumpster Fire Is Still Smoldering

Your sewer bill is about to go up again, but not as much as the Metropolitan Sewer District wanted. [WDRB]

Rebuffed by the Louisville Metro Council for a 20 percent rate boost to pay for a backlog of major maintenance, the Metropolitan Sewer District on Monday will ask its board to charge its customers 6.9 percent more. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Neighbors are upset over tree removal at Bowman Field. [WHAS11]

Four children sat cross-legged as their teacher flipped through a numbers book. When the page turned, they raced to yell the next number first — “six,” “seven” and then, “nine!” [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s tough to take Adam Edelen seriously because he wanted to be on the Foundation board. [WLKY]

Donald Trump’s policy agenda would quickly push the national debt to its highest level in history, according to a new report. [HuffPo]

The Jefferson County Public School Board of Education has met on multiple occasions to discuss the evaluation of Superintendent Dr. Donna Hargens. [WAVE3]

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on Monday called on the Senate to take immediate action this week to address Puerto Rico’s $70 billion debt crisis before the critical July 1 deadline for the island territory’s next debt payments. [Reuters]

The Louisville Metro Council will spend the next two weeks on summer break. When the 26-member legislative body returns to City Hall, they’ll likely focus on establishing a natural gas franchise agreement with Louisville Gas and Electric. That will set parameters the utility provider must abide by to use the public rights of way for natural gas transmission. [WFPL]

A short-handed Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law that tightens abortion clinic requirements in a way that critics say unduly restricts women’s access. [McClatchy DC]

Now that GE Appliances has been acquired by Qingdao Haier, several executive moves are taking place. [Business First]

It’s been a difficult few weeks for Erik Brewer, a former truck driver who recently became homeless before his van was totaled in a crash on Interstate 74 in western Indiana last month. [News & Tribune]

The City’s Losing Yet Another Convention

Louisville sure is Compassionate City. According to LMPD spokesperson Dwight Mitchell, three people were found dead in a home on the 1600 block of Louis Coleman Jr. Drive after police responded to a report of shots fired in the neighborhood Saturday afternoon. [WDRB]

Thanks, religious extremists, for ruining hospitals everywhere when you buy them up! The state is investigating whether patient care is unsafe at University of Louisville Hospital because of staff cuts made by KentuckyOne Health. [C-J/AKN]

WARING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As violence continues to spike around the city, one neighborhood is continuing to combat crime by promoting a festival of non-violence. [WHAS11]

Meanwhile, the people who do all the actual work at UK are paid dirt in comparison. University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto received a 48 percent increase in his base pay and a three-year contract extension Friday. [H-L]

If it’s not a gun death, it’s a stabbing, so that’s fun. Police are investigating a stabbing in southern Jefferson County. [WLKY]

Mitch McConnell (R-Cowardly Grandmother) is supporting Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump for president — but he isn’t saying, at least for now, whether he thinks the business mogul is actually up to the job. [HuffPo]

A big convention in Louisville will finish out its contract, and then it will be off to another city. SkillsUSA Executive Director Timothy Lawrence said hotels and transportation are the two biggest factors why the organization will be switching locations in 2021. [WAVE3]

A tax break that benefits only about 2,000 people adds up to billions in savings for them — and billions lost for the US economy. Leo Hindery Jr. remembers the call he got the night before he was to testify before Congress, in September of 2007, to close a tax loophole enjoyed by private-equity investors. It was from Stephen Schwarzman, co-founder of the Blackstone Group, the largest private-equity management firm in the US. [Bill Moyers]

Residents wishing to rent their homes through online portals like Airbnb must soon adhere to a set of local regulations. [WFPL]

Republicans STILL DON’T have an actual health care alternative and they never will. The House GOP’s health-care proposal would expand savings accounts, provide tax credits for buying insurance, and allow people to purchase coverage across state lines. Just don’t ask how much it costs. [The Atlantic]

Aetna Inc. and Humana Inc. are giving themselves a little more time to shore everything up before merging. [Business First]

The last vote is just three days away, but some the details regarding Floyd Memorial Hospital’s sale to Baptist Health have raised concerns among local officials. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate City Has Absolutely Turned Out To Be Worse Than Possibility City

What the hell is wrong with people?! [WDRB]

Only half of school-based certified staff think that Jefferson County Public Schools Superintendent Donna Hargens and other Central Office administrators are providing effective leadership in support of schools, according to a district survey that was posted online Friday. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Some University of Louisville folks have decided to sue Matt Bevin. [WHAS11]

Income inequality in Kentucky has grown significantly since 1979 and Fayette County is among the counties with the greatest inequality, says a study released last week by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A woman who survived a brutal attack in Hardin County five months ago was found dead Friday at her Warren County home. [WLKY]

As President Barack Obama approaches the end of his second term, there’s been much discussion of what his legacy will be. While much of that debate focuses on his foreign policy or his sweeping domestic policies, such as the Affordable Care Act, there’s another area where the 44th president has left a significant mark: making life easier for millions of working parents. [HuffPo]

Shenitrea Vaughn, 25, was shot in her home and has been recovering in Louisville. Doctors told her she may never walk again, but she’s fighting and learning how to live again. [WAVE3]

People in Orlando have dressed as guardian angels to protect the funeral of one of the Orlando shooting victims from homophobic protesters. [BBC]

New data show that while the wealthy in Kentucky keep earning more money, the poor continue to make even less. [WFPL]

Country and bluegrass music will ring from the hills of eastern Rowan County with a concert for the late Keith Whitley on Friday, July 1, at Poppy Mountain. [The Morehead News]

Louisville Metro Government will make $128,000 in loans to 13 local “microenterprises.” [Business First]

A new hearing room located within the Clark County jail for incarcerated inmates may save time and provide more security, courts and jail officials say. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Shootings & Racist Statues

The Muhammad Ali Center has received a $500,000 grant from The UPS Foundation to honor the boxer’s legacy, according to a news release. [WDRB]

A citizens’ petition requesting landmark designation for a house threatened with demolition in the Upper Highlands has halted the issuance of a wrecking permit for the site on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Leave it to E-town to burn down a restaurant with a cancer stick. Firefighters say an ignited cigarette thrown into a bed of dry mulch is believed to have started a fire that destroyed a McDonald’s restaurant in Elizabethtown. [WHAS11]

Ford Motor Co. executives spared no expense in overhauling the crown jewel of their empire, the F-150. They gave the truck a new aluminum body, smaller turbocharged engines and a lighter and stronger steel frame – all with an eye to appease U.S. regulators demanding cleaner vehicles. The initiative took six years and cost Ford more than $1 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Jefferson County judge has ruled that a Confederate monument near the University of Louisville can be removed and relocated. [WLKY]

A top official in the George W. Bush administration has become the most prominent Republican to endorse Hillary Clinton for president. [HuffPo]

A South Louisville woman trying to keep someone from getting into her apartment was shot late this past week. [WAVE3]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

While Republicans and Democrats differ wildly on firearms issues in Congress, opposition to gun control measures transcends political parties in Kentucky. [WFPL]

Democrats pushing for gun curbs after the latest mass shooting in the United States are co-opting a Republican mantra to build public support and defang opposition: it’s time to get tough on national security. [Reuters]

Ford is shortening its traditional two-week summer shutdown to one week at its sport utility vehicle manufacturing plants in Louisville, Chicago and Oakville, Ontario, according to a news release. [Business First]

The Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana has to wait at least until next month for the New Albany City Council’s funding resolution to go for a final vote. [News & Tribune]

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Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

All The Kudos To Greg Fischer

Louisville Metro Police are responding to a report of a shooting in the Middletown area. [WDRB]

A Louisville Metro Police officer is in stable condition after he was shot late Saturday night in the Russell neighborhood after a foot chase with a Louisville man, police said. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! This was the most insane story of the week locally, right? [WHAS11]

The publisher and author of escort Katina Powell’s book alleging that former Louisville men’s basketball staffer Andre McGee hired her and other dancers for sex parties at the Cardinals’ dormitory have countersued Louisville students, saying they attempted to “extort” a monetary settlement in their action alleging Powell and the book devalued their education. [H-L]

Metro United Way and the Center for Women and Families announced a partnership for 211 to expand its services in Louisville. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton’s first speech since she won a majority of pledged delegates in the Democratic presidential race included remarks about how abortion relates to other issues. That’s groundbreaking for a presidential candidate. [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer is calling on Louisville and southern Indiana residents to join him in marching in the Kentuckiana Pride Parade on Friday as a show of compassion and unity. [WAVE3]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

A woman who was shot by a Jefferson County constable in a Walmart parking lot has agreed to settle her lawsuit against the county government. The county will pay $75,000 in damages to Pedro and Tammie Ortiz on behalf of Constable David Whitlock, who shot Tammie Ortiz in November 2011. That brings the cost of the shooting for Jefferson County taxpayers to six figures, since the county has already paid more than $37,000 to Whitlock’s attorneys. [WFPL]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

A Louisville-based package-design company is expanding internationally. [Business First]

In the hopes of taking advantage of expected growth, the City of Charlestown could create a redevelopment authority board that would be able to borrow money and get to work. [News & Tribune]