How’d The Gays Ruin Your Life???

An attorney whose job in Jefferson County Public Schools’ central office was eliminated has been hired as a teacher at Central High School and will earn $84,000 – double the salary of a starting educator — despite not yet having teaching credentials. [WDRB]

Since becoming Chief of Police in 2012, serving the community where I first began as a young patrol officer in Western Louisville in 1980, I have strived to create a police force that is engaged and involved in the city; one that reflects the very people we serve. [C-J/AKN]

The thing no one wants to talk about: the highly-paid lobbyist behind all of this. [WHAS11]

With his campaign deep in debt, Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin is trying to make new friends among Kentucky’s well-heeled donor class. At a private reception in Lexington Monday night, Bevin joined Republican presidential candidate and Florida U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, the Philadelphia 76ers’ Nerlens Noel and some of the state’s top political donors at an event organized by Lexington power couple Kelly Knight and Joe Craft. [H-L]

The gays totally ruined your life again this week. [WLKY]

If you want to silence a black person’s pain, ask for forgiveness. We’re accustomed to our screams being hushed in the wake of tragedy. We’re accustomed to our grief being shoved aside in the rush to find mercy for those who have trespassed against us. [HuffPo]

About 30 same-sex couples have completed the paperwork for a marriage license through the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in the three business days since the United States Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage bans a violation of equal protections guaranteed through the Constitution’s 14th Amendment. [WAVE3]

The U.S. sued to block Electrolux AB’s $3.3 billion proposed takeover of General Electric Co.’s appliance business. [Bloomberg]

Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, a high-profile group riddled in the past year by tensions over President James Ramsey’s management style and sharing of information. [WFPL]

Data from Kentucky’s 446 public water systems shows they consistently produce excellent quality water and are nearly always in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water requirements, according to the Kentucky annual Drinking Water Report. The report summarizes the compliance data and status of public water system compliance monitoring results. [Energy & Environment Cabinet]

The parent company of The Courier-Journal and WHAS-TV split on Monday to form two new publicly traded companies: TEGNA Inc. and Gannett Co. Inc. [Business First]

Harrison County Council became the second county to sign a resolution in support of a regional development initiative Monday night, exactly two weeks after Clark County Council denied the same resolution to join formal discussions. [News & Tribune]

Where’s All That Compassion, Louisville?

More than a decade ago, lawmakers in Frankfort passed the same sex marriage ban that was overturned Friday by the Supreme Court. Reaction at the Capitol to the ruling was muted and mixed. [WDRB]

If Louisville health-care giant Humana sells, as expected, analysts and consultants who track the health care industry predict that a takeover would drastically shrink the local workforce. [C-J/AKN]

By a vote of 25 to 1, the Louisville Metro Council on Thursday approved the FY 2016 Capital and Operating Budgets for Metro Louisville. [WHAS11]

Luke Barlow and Jim Meade of Bardstown met 48 years ago and married in 2009 in Iowa. But, as Barlow said 90 minutes after the Supreme Court declared their marriage legal in Kentucky, the two men had never held hands in public here. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A large LGBT crowd gathered downtown at Jefferson Square to kick-off the celebrations. [WLKY]

Justice Antonin Scalia may have penned the most colorful dissent to Friday’s landmark Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality, but his colleague Clarence Thomas wrote the weirdest. [HuffPo]

Seems like maybe the issue here isn’t panhandling? And maybe the city should do a better job of, you know, being compassionate? [WAVE3]

Despite challenging lower court rulings throwing out Kentucky’s ban on same sex marriage, Gov. Steve Beshear moved quickly to comply with Friday’s historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling invalidating such bans in all 50 states. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Louisville Metro Council on Thursday approved a $873 million budget for the upcoming 2016 fiscal year, with a caveat that the total could increase by roughly $5 million for road paving if surplus funds are not available at the end of this fiscal year. [WFPL]

The authors of the 1968 Fair Housing Act wanted to reverse decades of government-fostered segregation. But presidents from both parties declined to enforce a law that stirred vehement opposition. [ProPublica]

You probably know that Louisville-based Humana Inc. is an acquisition target. Late last week, it was reported that Aetna Inc. has made an offer on the company. [Business First]

A Supreme Court decision handed down Friday that allows same-sex couples to legally marry in all 50 states wasn’t the only thing Melissa and Erin Love had to celebrate. The two Jeffersonville women, who share 2 and 6-year-old sons, tied the knot in Clark County exactly one year ago yesterday, making the historic day even more notable. [News & Tribune]

But We Can’t Come Up With WIC Funds

Aetna Inc., the second-largest U.S. health insurer by market value, is closing in on an acquisition of Humana Inc. and could reach a deal as early as this weekend, several people with knowledge of the matter said. [Bloomberg]

A man is found dead in the middle of the street in a quiet Fern Creek neighborhood. [WDRB]

But we can’t afford WIC programs… Louisville waterfront officials have cobbled together just over $500,000 that will go for major enhancements around the Big Four Bridge on the Kentucky shore. [C-J/AKN]

People are freaking out about the sighting of a bear. [WHAS11]

The U.S. Supreme Court could issue a decision on Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban as soon as Thursday, but Kentucky officials are staying mum on what, if any, preparations they’ve made if the justices vote to allow gay marriage. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Everybody is freaking out about some clouds. [WLKY]

A former Baltimore police sergeant took to Twitter Wednesday to air a stunning list of acts he said he participated in and witnessed during his 11 years on the city’s force. [HuffPo]

The giant hole in the ground where a couple of old buildings used to stand on Third Street makes it clear: Nothing is getting in the way of the new $300 million Omni Hotel project, not even the historic Louisville Water Company building. [WAVE3]

Racehorses are continuing to get quicker, a study of winning times spanning 165 years of racing indicates. [BBC]

Halfway into its first year, Louisville city officials and residents say a plastic bag ban for yard waste has been met with a surprisingly positive reception. [WFPL]

More Americans are renting — and paying more — as homeownership falls. [NY Times]

Names, birth dates, addresses and Social Security numbers may have been exposed after hackers gained access to classified Clarksville Town Court records Tuesday, a judge says. [Business First]

Less than 48 hours after nine black men and women were murdered inside a house of worship, prayers of encouragement, forgiveness and mercy were offered in the midst of a church that provided slaves safe passage during the Civil War. [News & Tribune]

Even Bill Lamb Calls Letter Absurd

Conservative Bill Lamb is causing racist white peoples’ heads to explode. When Bill Lamb is on the same side as Attica Scott when it comes to the FOP’s threatening letter? All hell is gonna break loose. [WDRB]

A joint interim Kentucky legislative committee called Wednesday for updating the rules governing property tax assessments while questioning Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer about whether his office is examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

efferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer appeared Wednesday morning before a legislative panel at Kentucky’s Capitol to explain and defend his office’s valuation practices. [WHAS11]

Pope Francis’ call for urgent action to combat climate change isn’t having much influence on members of Congress from the coal state of Kentucky, who are working this week to block the centerpiece of the president’s agenda to limit the greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s budget committee voted to add more than $5 million for road repairs. [WLKY]

Those who believe slavery was not a central point of conflict in the Civil War may wish to peruse the South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas declarations of secession. Those documents all explicitly cite threats to slavery as reasons for secession. Mississippi’s declaration goes so far as to say that “a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce and civilization.” [HuffPo]

Critics are questioning lawmakers jumping on the anti-confederate bandwagon and the president of the NAACP Kentucky State Conference and Louisville Chapter Raoul Cunningham said he’s just fine with that. [WAVE3]

The old gay Louisville. A writer returns to the city where he was raised—and exiled—to find what was lost when gay life entered the mainstream. [TNR]

The Louisville Metro Tree Commission holds its final meeting this evening and is expected to vote on a draft ordinance that could create a new tree commission and new city policies for tree management. [WFPL]

An overwhelming majority of Americans say they believe protests against unfair government treatment make the United States a better country. Unless, that is, the protesters are black. [WaPo]

For Tim Gramig, a longtime broker Louisville’s commercial real estate market, opportunity has knocked twice this year. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan failed to sign an ordinance calling for certain financial information be provided to the New Albany City Council at the last meeting of each month. In response, the council voted unanimously Thursday to again approve the measure, and thus overrode the pocket veto of Gahan. A pocket veto occurs when an executive takes no action on a bill as opposed to an outright veto of the measure. [News & Tribune]

Another Day, Another Compassionate Murder In Fischer’s Transparent City

MetroSafe dispatchers have confirmed that homicide detectives are investigating after a man’s body was found on the ground in the west end. [WDRB]

Activists said Sunday that the police shooting of a black man in Old Louisville a day earlier illustrates their claim that officers too often use excessive force to subdue people of color, and they said they hope it leads to police measures to increase transparency. [C-J/AKN]

Owning a home doesn’t come cheap and costs of maintenance and repairs to both inside as well as outside can add up. For the elderly and disabled, paying for the costs isn’t always easy. [WHAS11]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [H-L]

A Kentucky company that’s a top maker of whiskey and other spirits is buying a southern Indiana lumber mill that will turn out wooden segments for its bourbon barrels. Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman Corp. will spend $12 million to buy and expand that Owen County mill. [WLKY]

Any city struggling to house its residents should look no further than Houston for a few pointers. [HuffPo]

While facts began to surface about Saturday’s officer-involved shooting, local activists came together Sunday to discuss the fatal event. Their main concern is that they say the officer used unnecessary force. [WAVE3]

A group led by anti-gay pastor Rick Scarborough is vowing to defy any ruling by the Supreme Court that recognizes same-sex marriage. Louisville’s Six Flags Over Jesus is part of the group. [ThinkProgress]

A dramatic decline in Kentuckians earning GED diplomas over the last two years has led some lawmakers to question the current version of the test, which rolled out in January of 2014. [WFPL]

Workers are putting the finishing touches on rows of barracks in a 50-acre camp here, the largest immigration detention center in the country. It houses thousands of women and their children who were caught crossing the border illegally and are seeking asylum in the United States. [NY Times]

Nature’s Methane, an Indiana-based biofuel company, has plans to build not one but two biofuel facilities in west Louisville. [Business First]

The Louisville Metro Corrections officer who was charged with driving drunk along Spring Street and almost striking a patrol car before crashing through the Jeffersonville Overlook last year was sentenced to one year probation with a hefty price tag. [News & Tribune]

Let’s See How Many Compassionate Possibility City Shootings Greg Fischer Can Try To Ignore This Year

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. A shooting in the Parkland neighborhood sent two people to the hospital. [WDRB]

Blair Leano-Helvey is bringing a new twist to Louisville’s growing urban agriculture scene. She’s started a butterfly farm. [C-J/AKN]

On any given baseball diamond, you’re likely to find a young boy shine. The pride of a parent means alot, especially if you’re Scott Patrick and you’re parents outnumber your entire team. [WHAS11]

Want a look at what’s going on with Lexington’s school district? A Bryan Station High School teacher has told the Fayette County school board that the district’s failure to provide enough resources for a behavior management plan meant that “disruptions, disengagement and acts of violence and aggression are far too common at our school.” [H-L]

Locust Grove, the 18th century home of the sister and brother-in-law of George Rogers Clark and William Clark, is growing industrial hemp. [WLKY]

At a time of historic economic inequality, it should be a no-brainer to raise a tax on inherited wealth for the very rich. Yet there’s a move among some members of Congress to abolish it altogether. [HuffPo]

Wait, nope, there were two separate shootings Sunday evening. Police are investigating two separate shootings that happened about an hour apart overnight in Louisville. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is using an online questionnaire to gather additional public input about the future of quail restoration efforts in the state. [Richmond Register]

America’s top sire commands some $300,000 for each of his offspring. That adds up to about $35 million a year — and potentially hundreds of millions over his lifetime. [WFPL]

Science issues aren’t usually hot topics for presidential candidates, whose rhetoric tends to revolve more around jobs and the economy than space exploration and funding for energy research. But one organization wants to change that, and is pushing for 2016 presidential candidates to agree to a full debate on science issues, including climate change. [ThinkProgress]

People pulled out their wallets in a big way for this year’s WHAS Crusade for Children. The 62nd annual event raised nearly $5.7 million for children who have special need. [Business First]

Positive skin tests came back for 48 people tested for tuberculosis at Rock Creek Community Academy on Thursday, Clark County Health Department officials said, but that doesn’t mean 48 people have the disease. [News & Tribune]

County Attorney’s Office Sounds Fun

The Jefferson County Attorney’s Office has reprimanded a prosecutor and ordered him to go to sensitivity training for making “insensitive and derogatory” comments about the family that owns Hwang’s Martial Arts Academy. [WDRB]

Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer will be called to testify before a Kentucky legislative committee this month over allegations that his office is not physically examining taxable properties in accordance with state law. [C-J/AKN]

You might have to dig a little deeper to pay for your college degree as the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is set to vote on a tuition hike Thursday. [WHAS11]

Ahmed Zayat spends big money buying and betting on horses, and brags about how successful he’s been at everything he’s set out to accomplish. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just days into a pilot program for police body cameras, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has gone on the record to address concerns from the public. [WLKY]

The leaders of six of Europe’s largest oil producers are calling for a plan to price planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, citing climate change as “a critical challenge for our world.” [HuffPo]

For the third consecutive year Ford Motor Company says it will shorten the annual summer shutdown at some of its plants in order to meet the demand by consumers for vehicles. [WAVE3]

New York City, Baltimore and other major cities have seen a recent rise in gun violence. The uptick has raised the alarm for many police departments that worry the summer months may make the problem worse. [NPR]

Louisville transportation officials are offering bus passes to young people this summer at a discounted rate. [WFPL]

More than 150 people in southeast Indiana have been diagnosed with HIV, the largest outbreak in state history. [ProPublica]

Humana Inc. has completed the sale of its Concentra Inc. subsidiary for $1.06 billion in cash. [Business First]

Section 8 housing voucher system, social security income, food stamps — Kelli Orman wishes she didn’t have to rely on any of these low-income assistance services. [News & Tribune]