Revisiting Ramsey’s Big Reality Disconnect

You may have to watch your step more closely when crossing at least one downtown street. A pedway allowing easy access to the convention center will be going away. [WDRB]

How many scandalous hires does this make for Greg Fischer? The man has no concept of vetting new hires. Where are the liberal hand-wringers now? Every time a shitty hire is revealed, they freak out and attack. Every. Time. But suddenly they’re quiet. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! School time horror stories. “I had a chair thrown across the room and the kid looked at me–this is second grade–and said “what the f*** did I do b****,” Lucretia Gue, a former first grade teacher at Frayser Elementary School said. [WHAS11]

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

Local teevee folks are still freaking out about a white lady married to a preacher. When was the last time they freaked out like this over a person of color? Or over someone not tied to some random church? [WLKY]

Here’s one more indication that American teachers work really, really hard — and don’t make nearly enough. An analysis released Tuesday by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development looks at the state of education around the world, examining everything from intergenerational mobility in education to graduation rates to teacher pay. [HuffPo]

The YMCA of Louisville and the YMCA of Southern Indiana are merging, organization leaders announced during the 25th annual YMCA Mayor’s Thanksgiving Breakfast. [WAVE3]

Rand Paul, R-Cookie Tree, said after a town hall at the Highlands Museum and Discovery Center he is in conversations with the CEO of AK Steel about how to keep hundreds of jobs at Ashland Works afloat. [Ashland Independent]

James Ramsey has been thinking a lot lately about stepping down from his role as president of the University of Louisville. That’s all it took for him to think about resigning? Not the myriad scandals, people going to prison, tens of millions of dollars swindled?! [WFPL]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

Electrolux announced plans to buy General Electric Co.’s Louisville-based appliance division for $3.3 billion last year. But the government sued to block the deal in July, citing concerns that it would suppress competition. [Business First]

A bill to include LGBT people in existing anti-discrimination laws is on the slate for the State Senate’s upcoming legislative session. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

It’s Frigid. People Are Homeless. Step Up.

Only two years ago, one in every five patients who sought care at University of Louisville Hospital had no health insurance. [WDRB]

Wildlife in Need is again under fire from animal-rights group PETA after a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection revealed abuse of its animals and unsafe conditions for visitors. [C-J/AKN]

There are over $8 million dollars worth of improvement planned scheduled for the Louisville International Airport in 2016. [WHAS11]

Lexington and Louisville are getting out of the taxi cab regulation business. Mostly. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! It’s been more than week since an elderly woman was attacked and carjacked just feet from her front door. [WLKY]

Pushing back against efforts to bar Syrian refugees from resettling in the U.S., President Barack Obama vowed Saturday that his country will be a welcoming place for millions fleeing violence around the world “as long as I’m president.” [HuffPo]

Saturday morning, volunteers took more than 5,000 new, or gently-used, blankets to more than two dozen drop-off points. They’ll hand out equally as many next month. [WAVE3]

We’re looking at you, Rand Paul, and the rest of the bigoted cowards this state sends to Washington. Acutely aware of the consequences to Jews who were unable to flee Nazism, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum looks with concern upon the current refugee crisis. While recognizing that security concerns must be fully addressed, we should not turn our backs on the thousands of legitimate refugees. [United States Holocaust Memorial Museum]

Ford workers across the country have voted in favor of a new four-year contract. The United Auto Workers union said late Friday that the contract passed with a 51.4 percent vote. [WFPL]

It is one of the central political puzzles of our time: Parts of the country that depend on the safety-net programs supported by Democrats are increasingly voting for Republicans who favor shredding that net. [ProPublica]

Two major Louisville developments have received financial backing from state tourism officials. [Business First]

Another Jeffersonville City Council At-large winner’s eligibility to serve has been challenged in a recount petition. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

No, Voting Machines Are Not To Blame

Can you imagine if there were accountability like this for Jim Ramsey and the University of Louisville? Of course you can’t, don’t even try. [WDRB]

Surely no one is surprised that Greg Fischer and his crew tried to pull the wool over the eyes of everyone in the West End. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana’s first statewide program that pays for addiction and mental health treatment for convicted felons sent to community corrections instead of jail or prison is now underway. [WHAS11]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police say a 16-year-old boy stabbed his father in the chest Monday morning at a home on Saint Claire Drive. [WLKY]

When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. [HuffPo]

Of course John Boel is back to fearmongering. Leave it to him to try to crap all over needle exchanges. [WAVE3]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

Kentucky’s next state auditor, Danville Republican Rep. Mike Harmon, said he’s not sure if he’ll continue the investigation of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees and its relationship with the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment. [WFPL]

Three major companies, citing the under-representation of minorities in science and technology fields, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold affirmative action in university admissions in a closely watched case to be argued next month. [Reuters]

Almost Family Inc. has acquired Home Care by Black Stone, a Kenwood, Ohio-based nursing services provider, for $40 million. [Business First]

Community members are invited to help shape the future of their town by attending the “Envision South Clarksville” workshop for the South Clarksville Redevelopment Plan starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Ohio Falls United Methodist Church, 917 S. Virginia Ave., Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

Hype Isn’t Gonna Help JCPS Improve

We love to hate on Donna Hargens and Jefferson County Public Schools but come on. This is the dumbest thing yet from WDRB about JCPS and it’s being used by the racist anti-busing crowd. The insinuation (watch them try to claim otherwise in 3, 2…) that all teachers who resign do so because they feel unsafe is dangerous and based in teabagger delusion land. Remember that there are something like 6,000 teachers when they try to claim that a dozen resignations = harbinger of doom. [WDRB]

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer refused to sign an ordinance Thursday shielding area community centers for needy residents from his administrative changes after an overwhelming margin of Metro Council members passed the measure. Instead of vetoing the legislation, which was approved by a 20-3 vote last month, Fischer has asked the state attorney general to weigh in, launching the city’s two branches of government into a legal joust over who has final say about a potential overhaul at Neighborhood Place sites. [C-J/AKN]

Three people have been arrested and a man continues to recover in the hospital after a shooting in the Chickasaw neighborhood Friday night. [WHAS11]

Kip Cornett said he and his wife were at an airport in June when he read on his cellphone a column by Barry Weisbord, president and co-publisher of Thoroughbred Daily News. [H-L]

A 27-year-old Louisville man became the city’s latest homicide victim on Friday afternoon. [WLKY]

The medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders released its internal report on Thursday about the October attack on its hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan. The report also revealed that pilots shot at staff members fleeing the hospital. [HuffPo]

The Americana Community Center, Inc. held its annual fundraiser Saturday night. The center strives to provide a spectrum of services to the diverse individuals and families of the Louisville Metro area, including refugees, immigrants and those born in the United States. [WAVE]

By most accounts, Kentucky’s implementation of President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare reform was a success. Tuesday’s elections in the state could mean big changes are coming, however – with ominous portents for the future of the president’s signature legislative achievement. [BBC]

The fallout continues from Halloween, when University of Louisville President James Ramsey and his staff posed for a photograph at a U of L party wearing stereotypical “Mexican” costumes. The photo went viral, and a few written apologies were issued, but they’ve been lacking. [WFPL]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Wait, people are surprised this is happening? Its been quite a ride, but the Velocity Indiana entrepreneurial accelerator and co-working space is effectively closing shop. [Business First]

In another plea for the state’s help on Clark County’s diminishing revenue stream, County Attorney Lisa Glickfield is drafting a letter of support from board members to legislators to raise the tax levy. [News & Tribune]

West End Methane Plant Fun Continues

On Tuesday, voters in Clark County voted in resounding fashion to quash a move to bring in millions of extra tax dollars to improve school buildings. [WDRB]

Nature’s Methane is offering a coalition of western Louisville leaders and organizations around $5 million in gifts and investments as it tries to move forward with its plan to build a controversial methane plant fueled by food waste in the California neighborhood, according to several sources familiar with the negotiations. [C-J/AKN]

Pat Mulvihill has been elected to the job of 10th district councilman. He’s ready to help his constituents, but unlike his predecessor, the embattled Economy Inn won’t be his top priority. [WHAS11]

The latest report on coal production and employment in Kentucky reinforces how far and fast the industry has fallen. [H-L]

The date has been set for the public celebration on the Downtown Bridge. [WLKY]

The long-awaited text of a landmark U.S.-backed Pacific trade deal was released on Thursday, revealing the details of a pact aimed at freeing up commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy but criticized for its opacity. [HuffPo]

Patrick Mulvihill may be serving the shortest term of any local political elected Tuesday, but he says he plans to make the most of it. [WAVE3]

ProPublica and Frontline reopen the investigation into a death squad run by former South Vietnamese military men that killed journalists, torched businesses and intimidated those who challenged its dream of re-starting the Vietnam War — all on American soil. [ProPublica]

AT&T has filed a protest against a Kentucky state government project to expand broadband fiber throughout the state. The telecommunications giant claims KentuckyWired has an unfair advantage in the bidding process. In its protest, AT&T states KentuckyWired “almost certainly has confidential, inside information that no other bidder could have.” AT&T said KentuckyWired Executive Director Steve Rucker was deputy secretary of the state’s Finance and Administration Cabinet when the agency started developing its request for proposal. [WFPL]

America is undergoing a religious polarization. With more adults shedding their religious affiliations, as evidenced in the latest from the Pew Research Center, the country is becoming more secular. In the past seven years, using the new Pew data, Americans who identify with a religion declined six points. Overall, belief in God, praying daily and religious service attendance have all dropped since 2007. [WaPo]

Shares of Louisville-based Papa John’s International Inc. plunged Wednesday, following the company’s third-quarter earnings report yesterday. By the end of the trading day, shares were down $8.22 per share, or 12.08 percent, to $59.83. [Business First]

Clark County election results were left open-ended into early morning Wednesday as close to 1,000 absentee ballots were in question countywide because a voting machine couldn’t read them. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Jim Ramsey Did A Stupid Thing

It has made headlines for crime and health violations, but Saturday brought a different view of a controversial Louisville hotel. The Economy Inn held a Halloween party. [WDRB]

The former principal of Buechel Metro High School says Jefferson County Public Schools leaders have created a false perception of his tenure as a way to demonstrate a need to merge two alternative schools and create the new Minor Daniels Academy. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police are investigating a shooting that happened just south of downtown. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton Jr. has stepped in, after months of back-and-forth between Jefferson District and Family courts over which would take on the additional workload of new Emergency Protective Orders meant to protect dating couples from an abusive partner. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are conducting a death investigation after a was body found Saturday morning near Frost Middle School. [WLKY]

Triple Crown champion American Pharoah took charge out of the gate, winning the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 1/2 lengths Saturday in his final race before retirement. [HuffPo]

On Tuesday New Albany voters will decide who should lead the city. There will be three names to chose from – the incumbent, a real estate developer or a businessman. [WAVE3]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

Everyone keeps begging us to write about Jim Ramsey’s latest racist stunt. If this is what sets everyone on fire over Jimbo and his mess, something’s gone terribly wrong. The man has been in a literal pile of corrupt shit since 2008. Felner and the rest of the folks have thieved, done prison time, gotten away with everything while Ramsey turned a blind eye. Shirley Dubya? She’s currently being paid more than $300,000 to do nothing for a year. The myriad Rick Pitino sex scandals? Just blips on the radar. But the man shows his true colors by dressing in a demeaning and racist way? That’s what sets fire to him and causes rage to bubble to the surface? We’re tired. [WFPL]

Amid the recent pressure on police to wear body cameras, one thing is often overlooked: Not all cameras are created equal. In fact, cameras vary a lot — and the variations — some contentious — can have a profound effect on how the cameras are used and who benefits from them. [NPR]

The U.S. Justice Department has rejected a settlement offer from AB Electrolux that would have allowed the company to move ahead with its acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

While candidates for Charlestown’s city council come from different parts of the area and different political parties, they all envision a growing Charlestown. That’s because with the River Ridge Commerce Center and the east-end bridge, the city can’t escape changes. But how the city can take advantage of those changes is where the candidates from the city’s four districts differ. The most talked about issues include the future of the Pleasant Ridge Subdivision and they city’s battle with brown water. [News & Tribune]