Compassionate Shootings & Racist Statues

The Muhammad Ali Center has received a $500,000 grant from The UPS Foundation to honor the boxer’s legacy, according to a news release. [WDRB]

A citizens’ petition requesting landmark designation for a house threatened with demolition in the Upper Highlands has halted the issuance of a wrecking permit for the site on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Leave it to E-town to burn down a restaurant with a cancer stick. Firefighters say an ignited cigarette thrown into a bed of dry mulch is believed to have started a fire that destroyed a McDonald’s restaurant in Elizabethtown. [WHAS11]

Ford Motor Co. executives spared no expense in overhauling the crown jewel of their empire, the F-150. They gave the truck a new aluminum body, smaller turbocharged engines and a lighter and stronger steel frame – all with an eye to appease U.S. regulators demanding cleaner vehicles. The initiative took six years and cost Ford more than $1 billion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Jefferson County judge has ruled that a Confederate monument near the University of Louisville can be removed and relocated. [WLKY]

A top official in the George W. Bush administration has become the most prominent Republican to endorse Hillary Clinton for president. [HuffPo]

A South Louisville woman trying to keep someone from getting into her apartment was shot late this past week. [WAVE3]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

While Republicans and Democrats differ wildly on firearms issues in Congress, opposition to gun control measures transcends political parties in Kentucky. [WFPL]

Democrats pushing for gun curbs after the latest mass shooting in the United States are co-opting a Republican mantra to build public support and defang opposition: it’s time to get tough on national security. [Reuters]

Ford is shortening its traditional two-week summer shutdown to one week at its sport utility vehicle manufacturing plants in Louisville, Chicago and Oakville, Ontario, according to a news release. [Business First]

The Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana has to wait at least until next month for the New Albany City Council’s funding resolution to go for a final vote. [News & Tribune]

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Finally, An End To A Terrible Week

A spokeswoman for insurance giant Humana says the company is increasing security after receiving a report of graffiti found inside a restroom. [WDRB]

This is what lobbyists can get you. Norton Healthcare has secured city agreement to issue up to $725 million in tax-exempt bonds, with much of the proceeds targeted for helping to pay for a long list of capital projects. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell, author of Breaking Cardinal Rules, has now added her name to a lawsuit against some UofL students who claimed their degrees were diminished by her claims. [WHAS11]

Growing abuse of the powerful painkiller fentanyl drove the number of overdose deaths in Kentucky to a new record high in 2015, according to a report released Tuesday. [H-L]

Officials with MSD, LG&E and the Louisville Water Company announced the date for the 27th annual Ohio River sweep — June 18. [WLKY]

John McCain is responsible for the Orlando massacre because he has long pushed homophobic policies. [HuffPo]

Indiana State Police are asking for the public’s help in solving two homicide cases. On May 11, the bodies of Sarah Ipock, 30, and an unidentified male were pulled from the Ohio River by separate barge crews. [WAVE3]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

It seems unlikely that Louisville Metro Council members will approve a large sewer rate increase after a contentious budget hearing Wednesday. [WFPL]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Kindred Healthcare Inc. plans to build a four-story nursing home in Louisville’s East End. [Business First]

The Clarksville Police Department plans to suspend its use of body cameras in anticipation of a new law that dictates how departments store footage and when they have to release that footage to the public come July 1. [News & Tribune]

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Puke Alert: Ali Funeral Ticket Scalpers

The Jefferson County Coroner’s office could soon be without a morgue in a battle between county and state. [WDRB]

When young Cassius Clay returned to his hometown in 1960 after winning an Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight, he was greeted by hundreds of fans at the airport, and a 30-car motorcade followed him to Central High School, his alma mater. [C-J/AKN]

People are so disgusting that they scalped tickets FOR A FUNERAL! It’s so gross we’re still thinking about it more than 24 hours later. [WHAS11]

Have you seen what’s going on in Lexington? Houses and other buildings on 10-acre lots must be excluded from the total acreage before an agricultural exemption on property taxes can be given to a homeowner, according to an official legal opinion from the Kentucky Department of Revenue to Fayette County Property Valuation Administrator David O’Neill. [H-L]

Compassionate City has reached peak pedestrian accident. Getting hit by an LMPD cruiser takes the cake. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama mourned the death of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in a Saturday statement, remembering “The Greatest” for his talent and his spirit. [HuffPo]

Why we love Louisville: someone gets shot every day. [WAVE3]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

Demand for bourbon is putting pressure on the population of Kentucky’s white oak trees, which are used to make staves for whiskey barrels. [WFPL]

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Forty-five years after founding his fire-protection company, Richard Barber was considering an expansion plan. Meanwhile, an Indiana company was looking for growth opportunities. [Business First]

Getting some answers on the process and what’s coming forward for the Summit Springs development off State Street is the aim of a city council work session Monday night. [News & Tribune]

Racist Republicans Are Really Butthurt

University of Louisville President James Ramsey received total compensation of $2.8 million from the school’s nonprofit foundation in 2014, while the university’s former provost Shirley Willihnganz received $1.1 million and Ramsey’s chief of staff, Kathleen Smith, received $859,181. [WDRB]

The second-graders in Sarah Bowling’s class at Dunn Elementary were on a mathematical scavenger hunt. Students cradling clipboards moved around the room matching groupings of things and learning the concept that three groups of five things total the same as five groups of three things. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! There is no fallout, just a bunch of racists calling for the death of Ricky Jones. [WHAS11]

As more coal companies file for bankruptcy, it’s increasingly likely that taxpayers will be stuck with the very high costs of preventing abandoned mines from becoming environmental disasters. [H-L]

Norfolk Southern is pursuing criminal charges against an Ohio man for disrupting rail service. [WLKY]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) went all in on Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.), the head of the Democratic National Committee, on Saturday, saying he supports a primary challenger in her re-election bid for her House seat and would remove her from the DNC if elected president. [HuffPo]

The decision came after a Brown School Student Based Decision Making (SBDM) Council meeting on Tuesday night. [WAVE3]

Most shootings with four deaths or injuries are invisible outside their communities. And most of the lives they scar are black. [NY Times]

On a rainy Friday afternoon, about a half-dozen people stay dry inside the storied Phoenix Hill Tavern on Baxter Avenue. [WFPL]

Uhhh… [ThinkProgress]

Three descendants of Brown-Forman Corp. founder George Garvin Brown have been elected the company’s board of directors, and three other descendants will leave the board. [Business First]

By upgrading its lights in city hall, Jeffersonville expects to save $12,000 this year. The energy and cost savings are part of Duke Energy’s Smart Saver Incentive Program, which rewards businesses that replace equipment with higher-efficiency products by lowering the costs of purchasing new equipment. [News & Tribune]

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At Least There’s Good Bourbon News

Check out the spin/excuses from Jack Conway’s former spokesperson. A meeting held Wednesday was supposed to address the JCPS code of conduct. However, JCPS and the Metro Public Safety Committee saw the clock run out on a conversation many are waiting to have. [WDRB]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky bourbon production hit a nearly 50-year high last year. [WHAS11]

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Ten years ago a 2-year-old Louisville girl was shot multiple times and her mother was killed. [WLKY]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

While JCPS tries to provide social and emotional support for students in the form of Student Response Teams, Positive Behavior Coaches and other resources, Metro Council members voiced their concern that it is not enough. [WAVE3]

Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump said it would take another 9/11 to wake up border security — and predicted refugees would plan the next attack. [The Hill]

Faculty and staff within the Jefferson County Public Schools system continue to call out district administration for potential changes to teacher salary structure and the student code of conduct. [WFPL]

Interviews with dozens of women who have worked for Donald Trump or interacted with him socially reveal a pattern of often unsettling personal behavior by the Republican presidential candidate, The New York Times reported on Saturday. [Reuters]

Kroger isn’t just in the beginning stages of grocery delivery, it’s been testing refining things in Lexington and other markets so it can be rolled out ASAP. [Business First]

Anesthesiologist Jaime Guerrero, who had a practice in Jeffersonville, was sentenced to 100 months in prison Thursday by United States District Judge Greg N. Stevens, and according to the terms of a prior plea agreement, agreed to forfeit his license to practice medicine and real property owned by Guerrero Real Estate Investments, LLC. [News & Tribune]

Another Compassionate Pedestrian Death

Another day, another pedestrian death in Compassionate City. Louisville Metro Police say a woman was killed after being hit by an SUV on Zorn Avenue. [WDRB]

Louisville Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens has been suspended from the bench as a state judicial disciplinary body considers misconduct charges against him. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! An agreement has been reached. Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens will be suspended with pay while both sides settle their differences. [WHAS11]

Luxco, the St. Louis-based liquor company that markets Rebel Yell, Blood Oath and Ezra Brooks bourbons, announced Monday that it will build a $35 million, 18,000-square-foot distillery in Nelson County that is expected to be fully operational by late 2017. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway in Jennings County after a body was found in a lake. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) appeared to offer a thinly veiled rebuke of liberal economist Paul Krugman on Wednesday by highlighting a “scary” too-big-to-fail ruling from federal bank regulators. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating after someone opened fire at an apartment that is across the street from where a child was hit and killed Friday. [WAVE3]

The Turd Cruz-Mitch McConnell slap fight is getting crazier by the minute. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Councilwoman Jessica Green wants police officers to spend more time patrolling on foot and bike in an effort to build better relationships with communities. [WFPL]

Twelve state attorneys general have asked the federal Department of Education to revoke the recognition of the much-criticized Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. [ProPublica]

The Old Forester Distillery project will give a fresh look to some very old structures on Main Street in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Gathered in the Nolan Solar Building, the former art students met with their teacher, chatted for a while and marveled at their finished product, a mural spanning an entire wall along a staircase. [News & Tribune]

Another “Compassionate” Tuesday Morning

LG&E and Kentucky Utilities can create up to 20 battery charging stations for electric cars across the state, regulators said in an order issued Monday. [WDRB]

If history is any guide, even if a majority of the University of Louisville trustees support besieged President James Ramsey, a vote of no confidence by the Faculty Senate could trigger his departure. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Five months after the November election, there are still unanswered questions about a City Council race. [WHAS11]

A federal judge said in an order filed Monday that he anticipates setting conditions under which controversial Floyd County lawyer Eric C. Conn could be released from jail pending his trial on federal fraud charges. [H-L]

At least it didn’t happen in Louisville…? A Hardin County school bus driver was taken to the hospital Monday afternoon when she drove a bus off Leitchfield Road. [WLKY]

U.S. President Barack Obama said Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton never jeopardized national security in the handling of her emails as his secretary of state. [HuffPo]

After an increase in shootings and murders last year, the community came together Sunday to address the violence in Louisville. The “Survivors Movement on Broadway,” a march for gunshot survivors and victims’ families, took place downtown. [WAVE3]

The spirits company behind Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey is taking a deeper plunge into Kentucky bourbon. [WKYT]

Four companies are seeking public right-of-way access to install the infrastructure needed to bring ultra high-speed internet to Louisville. [WFPL]

“Immigration is the only thing that drives Donald Trump crazy apart from yellow number 5 hair colour,” jokes Chumel Torres, a Mexican comedian that has taken the internet by storm. [BBC]

How on earth is this East End condo development hot mess still going on?! [Business First]

A new transportation plan outlining the recently completed, current and future Clark County roads and bridges projects is expected to help as county leaders prepare for the next five years. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]