JCPS Bus Crash Marathon Continues

Another day, another fun Jefferson County Public Schools bus crash. [WDRB]

Louisville had the sharpest increase of any U.S. city in terms of residents age 65 or older who are scrapping by to pay their rent, according to findings released Monday by a national affordable housing group. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Now that plans for a methane plant in West Louisville are off the table, Heaven Hill has announced new plans for the property at 17th and Maple Streets in the California neighborhood. [WHAS11]

Cheers, Kentucky: Bourbon and American whiskey sales in the United States were up 7.8 percent to $2.9 billion in 2015, according to figures released Tuesday morning by the Distilled Spirits Council of the U.S. Looking at exports, sales of American whiskey were up 4 percent by volume, although the value fell 2.7 percent to about $1 billion, putting total sales of American whiskey at just less than $4 billion for 2015. [H-L]

Another day in Compassionate City means it’s time for another pedestrian to be struck! This time it’s a child. [WLKY]

Real estate mogul Donald Trump accused Ted Cruz of fraud on Wednesday, claiming the Texas senator “stole” the Iowa caucuses and arguing that “either a new election should take place or Cruz results nullified.” [HuffPo]

As the HIV crisis around Louisville and southern Indiana worsens one organization is doing what it can to stop it. [WAVE3]

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is suspending his campaign for president after a disappointing finish in Iowa, turning his focus now to his Senate re-election bid. [NPR]

You can’t fix stupid in Frankfort. The State Senate voted to defund Planned Parenthood. Because the entire body is filled with mouth-breathers who believe everything that scares them on Fox News. [WFPL]

If you missed it, some disgusting stuff has gone on in Shelby County for several years. But legal action has been taken to hold people accountable for atrocious animal abuse and torture. [Page One]

You might not think much about the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville, but there’s a lot going on there. More than ever, in fact. [Business First]

To capture more revenue from a growing local economy, the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission is hoping to significantly expand one of its tax-increment finance districts. [News & Tribune]

All This Snow Makes Day Drinking OK

WDRB is apparently still freaking out over kids misbehaving on school buses. [WDRB]

Brown-Forman Corporation has received an initial go-ahead from city regulators to start major work on its Old Forester Distillery and visitors experience project at 117-119 W. Main St. [C-J/AKN]

We’d tell you what WHAS11 was freaking out about but their website was down all day. And their crotchety old twitter people have us blocked, unlike every other media outlet in town, because they probably can’t take jokes. Even WDRB knows how to take a joke. Eric Flack can take a joke. Can you imagine? It’s the most hilarious thing since A Kentucky Newspaper started blocking our websites due to criticism of its atrocious Felner coverage. [Deep WHAS11 Funtimes]

Preliminary estimates from a consulting firm hired by the city show the cost will be $175 to $200 million to build a fiber-optic network to increase sluggish Internet speeds and expand Internet access in Fayette County. [H-L]

SNOOOOOOOOOWWWWWPOOOOOOCALYYYYYYYYYPSEEEEEEEEE! [WLKY]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), still disappointed at being left off the main stage at last week’s GOP presidential debate, expressed disapproval of polling criteria during a campaign stop at a barbershop on Monday afternoon. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police confirmed Wednesday that remains found in Oldham County were those of a UPS pilot missing since May. [WAVE3]

Just a reminder of what Julie Raque Adams has been doing to poor women in Kentucky. While she flits about Frankfort talking about how great she is for wealthy, Republican women? Poor people are suffering as a direct consequense of her imposing her antiquated religious beliefs on the Commonwealth. [Page One]

Police departments across Kentucky began outfitting officers with body cameras last year, but don’t expect state troopers to join their ranks anytime soon. [WFPL]

For years there have been calls for more transparency in Kentucky’s retirement systems, especially the system for lawmakers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republic Bancorp Inc. CEO Steve Trager has just gained control of an additional 671,808 shares of the bank-holding company’s stock, according to a Jan. 8 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. [Business First]

Cheaper cigarettes are the lure for people in Illinois who cross the Wabash River to visit the Smoker Friendly tobacco outlets in Indiana. [News & Tribune]

Who Is Worse? Tom Wine Or Jim Ramsey? Possibility City!

Their homes were bombed, lives threatened, and they nearly starved to death. Now the newest Syrian refugee families have found a safe-haven right here in Louisville. [WDRB]

Tom Wine. MLK parade. Shenanigans. Read all about it. [C-J/AKN]

This is what local media has become. An “exclusive” interview in the “crime” section with the kid who crashed a drone in Lexington. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Housing Corp. is looking for volunteers to help count Kentucky’s homeless population. The count will begin at sunrise on Jan. 27 and continue for 24 hours. The point-in-time count is known as the K-Count. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Members of The Stand Up Louisville Coalition began planning a protest in recent days, after learning that Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine would be a grand marshal in the 44th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Motorcade. Now Wine has withdrawn his name from the list of grand marshals. [WLKY]

General Electric Co agreed to sell its appliances business to China’s Qingdao Haier Co Ltd for $5.4 billion in cash, the companies said on Friday. The move comes weeks after GE abandoned a $3.3 billion deal with Sweden’s Electrolux following months of opposition from U.S. antitrust regulators. [HuffPo]

Didn’t this happen just a couple years ago? Late November 2013, maybe? [WAVE3]

The nation’s cities are at the frontlines of a food system that sickens and impoverishes millions of Americans every year. Local communities where people live, shop, work, and receive healthcare bear the brunt of this system’s unhealthy, unjust outcomes, which disproportionately affect communities of color and low-income Americans. The five cities chosen—Oakland, Memphis, Louisville, Baltimore, and Minneapolis—all have populations between 400,000 and 700,000, and in all of them, the percentage of residents living below the federal poverty line is higher than the national average. [Click the Clicky]

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is launching a new program to provide a long-acting, reversible contraceptive arm implant to women in Louisville. [WFPL]

The Obama administration on Friday said it would announce the next steps in its planned overhaul of how the United States manages coal development on federal land, which sources have said includes freezing new leases. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Senate passed a measure Thursday that’s aimed at allowing the state’s bourbon tourism industry to reach its full potential. [Business First]

Even though he won a recount, Jeffersonville City Councilman Steve Webb is challenging the lawfulness of November’s general election, requesting a trial that could result in a special election. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Will Ruin Your Wednesday

Median household income was flat or declined in all but four of Kentucky’s 120 counties in the years following the Great Recession, according to new Census Bureau data. [WDRB]

Kentucky State Reformatory was overcrowded and hazardous for inmates and staff before inmates’ federal lawsuit. [C-J/AKN]

Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. Angela Newby Bouggess and her husband Jerry say Jan. 4 is never an easy one. [WHAS11]

John Yarmuth is right – Kentucky Democrats probably won’t have a viable senate candidate to run against Rand Paul. Half his staff is under federal indictment and KDP is handing him a re-election victory. [H-L]

A program that allows Lexington parking ticket recipients to cover their fines with canned goods for the hungry has collected 5 tons of food during the holidays. [WLKY]

The Obama administration on Monday defended its deportation tactics and confirmed it has begun raids on families, despite Democratic candidates and immigrant advocates saying officials could be sending mothers and children to their deaths. [HuffPo]

Twenty-eight bottles of the most sought-after bourbon will be available to the public, after it is released from the court. [WAVE3]

Or will they? Franklin County’s sheriff says the bourbon will be destroyed. [H-L]

Mega road fund cuts were initiated by Matt Bevin and almost no one noticed. But we did. [Page One]

A pair of community groups are hosting a forum next week that aims to discuss the state of race relations in Louisville. [WFPL]

U.S. manufacturing contracted further in December as lower oil prices undercut spending in the energy sector while construction spending fell in November for the first time in nearly 1-1/2 years, suggesting the economy ended 2015 with less momentum. [Reuters]

Springhurst Health and Rehab is undergoing a $5.2 million expansion project that should be done by mid-2016. [Business First]

Patti Hall saw a need in her Sellersburg community that wasn’t being fulfilled, so about two years ago, she decided to fill it. [News & Tribune]

Murder: It’s Extremely Possible Here!

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Another murderous weekend in Compassionate Possibility City! Police are investigating a homicide on Millers Lane in Valley Station. [WDRB]

A fledgling community group focused on issues in Kentucky’s largest school district is soliciting anonymous letters from teachers, parents, students and others about what is going on in Jefferson County Public Schools. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville Metro Police are looking for answers and a suspect after a man’s body was discovered in an alley Saturday evening. [WHAS11]

The chairman of the University of Louisville’s board of trustees says President James Ramsey has the board’s full support during an FBI investigation of top health care executive David Dunn and two other officials. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville police are investigating a deadly shooting in a Shawnee neighborhood. [WLKY]

After two weeks of tense talks, word-wrangling and marathon overnight meetings, diplomats in Paris agreed to a global climate change accord on Saturday evening — a day after the summit’s scheduled conclusion. [HuffPo]

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Merit Board has become a bit of a talking point for city leaders asking for more diversity in Louisville’s government. [WAVE3]

The fight over LGBT discrimination in Indiana is far from over. Not only are Republicans considering one of the most anti-LGBT bills ever, a new lawsuit is seeking to overturn what limited protections exist in the state. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville has dealt with its own issues with gun violence. Homicides in the city spiked in 2015, and guns were used in many of those murders. But local firearm regulations won’t happen in Louisville, or anywhere else in Kentucky — state law prohibits local government from adopting local gun law. [WFPL]

People with names that suggest they are black are being discriminated against on room sharing site AirBnB, a Harvard study suggests. [BBC]

Back in 1991, Michael Veach was a graduate student at the University of Louisville, working on a master’s degree in history when he heard that an area distiller was looking for help. [Business First]

With no recommended changes, the Jeffersonville City Council approved a salary ordinance during its meeting Monday that gives all elected officials pay increases. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. [Ting]

Fun Fischer Tax Hikes & Horrible Bigots

There’s a new statue on Louisville’s Museum Row. [WDRB]

Just what Louisville’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Bourbon has become such a big tourism draw that the Louisville Filson Historical Society celebrates the day prohibition was repealed more than 80 years ago. [WHAS11]

The water tower in Lebanon is about to get a new mural that should make it very popular on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. The tower will be graced by a bottle of bourbon, making it look like the world’s largest Maker’s Mark pour. The city’s 135-foot water tower will be getting a mural by internationally recognized muralist Eric Henn, who will paint it to look like the neck of a gigantic bottle, complete with signature red wax, is pouring bourbon straight down. [H-L]

The Muhammad Ali Center marked a milestone this week — 10 years in Louisville. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama is accusing Republicans who oppose allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S. of being scared of widows and orphans. He says the political posturing “needs to stop.” [HuffPo]

This story will cause area bigots to lose their minds. [WAVE3]

U.S. consumer prices increased in October after two straight months of declines as the cost of healthcare and other services rose, evidence of firming inflation that further supports views that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month. [Reuters]

Amid city efforts to develop a system for reusing elements of historical buildings, stakeholders and city officials met Monday to discuss potential uses for preserved parts of the old Board of Trade building. [WFPL]

Poverty does not treat men and women equally, especially in old age. Women 65 years old and older who are living in poverty outnumber men in those circumstances by more than 2 to 1. And these women are likely to face the greatest deprivation as they become older and more frail. [NPR]

Ford Motor Co.’s 9,000 UAW members have voted to reject a new contract that would have set working conditions and raises through the next four years. [Business First]

Indiana bigots are apparently just like Kentucky bigots. Two Syrian refugee families who had been approved to be moved to the United States and were scheduled to arrive in Indianapolis on Thursday have been officially told they are not welcome. [News & Tribune]

They Poured Out Perfectly Fine Bourbon!

Thought everything was puppies and rainbows with the new person running Metro Animal Services? So much for hiring an underwear model to run an agency mired in scandal. Now Possibility City sees what happens when Greg Fischer puts these folks in charge. [C-J/AKN]

What, you thought Matt Bevin wasn’t a backward-ass bigot? [WDRB]

If there’s a bike lane, bicyclists better use it, or they may find themselves in jail. That’s the message a Louisville Metro Police officer gave to bicycling advocate and former mayoral candidate Jackie Green on Friday in the form of a double citation for blocking traffic and running a red light. [More C-J/AKN]

The Dare to Care Kids Café has expanded to include a new location. Children 18 and younger can now go to the Shawnee Community Center on South 37th Street for a hot, healthy meal between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The cost is free. [WHAS11]

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

WARNING! AUTOPLAY VIDEO! As authorities continue to investigate a shooting and carjacking in Old Louisville, many who live and work there say their community is no more dangerous than any other part of the metro. [WLKY]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

If you wanna pour out Elijah Craig, just send it here instead. It’s a big stink in the California neighborhood, even after some community leaders struck a deal with Heaven Hill Distillery for a proposed biodigester. [WAVE3]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

An advertising campaign to drive students to Clarksville Community Schools cost more than $163,000, but the 83 students it’s credited with bringing in gave the district an extra $548,000 in tuition support from the state for the district. [News & Tribune]