Ramsey Era: Nothing But Scandals & Sex

What this means is Mark Hebert (haha, just kidding/trying to get a rise out of Hebert) is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

You already knew Donna Hargens is as bad as the previous two heads of JCPS. None of this will come as a surprise to you, as it apparently does to education reporters. [C-J/AKN]

Oh, please, no one is shocked someone with integrity jumped ship from JCPS. [WHAS11]

Aww, lookit, Jimbo Ramsey has another sex scandal on his hands. And this one will probably cost him more than Robert Felner and the rest of the bunch combined. [H-L]

The Louisville Metro Council’s Intergovernmental Affairs Committee received an update on the city’s Needle Exchange Program. So far, after almost four months, the program has had more than 800 participants, and more than 300 of them have come back more than once. [WLKY]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

A vegetable garden along Southwestern Parkway in the Shawnee neighborhood is sowing more than seeds. [WAVE3]

Some prominent Northern Kentucky Republicans have told the Enquirer they support Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. The bitterness among many Republicans against the tea party, which has challenged many in leadership recent years, might catch up to Republican candidate Matt Bevin, often seen as an outsider candidate who has heavy tea party support. [Cincinnasti.com]

21st Century Parks is scheduled to open the third of four parks next week. The quartet will eventually make up the Parklands of Floyds Fork — a donor-supported public park system near I-265 in eastern Jefferson County. [WFPL]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

Louisville’s Republic Bancorp Inc. has expanded its reach in Florida with the $32.3 million purchase of St. Petersburg, Fla.-based Cornerstone Community Bank. [Business First]

If you’ve ever seen an elderly person or a child in need and couldn’t resist lending a helping hand, then you might know how Jeffersonville police officer Amber Tharp feels every moment of every day. [News & Tribune]

Fischer: Your White Privilege Is Showing

Officials have released the names of two people who were recently killed in separate incidents. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell and District Court Judge Stephanie Pearce Burke are again butting heads, this time over Burke’s handling of a case originally set for trial this week. If you haven’t kept up with this, it’s crazy. [C-J/AKN]

Greg Fischer says that if you aren’t doing anything illegal, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Which should ring hollow for just about anybody with the ability to think on their own. Those 150+ shootings are super-compassionate. Nothing to see here, puppies and rainbows. [WHAS11]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

State officials plan to keep an outreach center open for one more year in a southern Indiana county that’s facing the largest HIV outbreak in state history. [WLKY]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

This white lady assaulted a police officer by allegedly grabbing her throat. She wasn’t arrested or shot. [WAVE3]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Some would-be homebuyers in Louisville are facing tough conditions. New figures from the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors show that the number of homes available for sale is down 17 percent from last year. [WFPL]

Two years ago in the Netherlands, artist Paul de Kort designed an 81-acre park near Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport. His assignment? To use nothing but landscaping to dampen the noise of airplanes. Such a project had never been attempted—and the science behind his design was discovered almost by accident. [Gizmodo]

Commercial real estate developer William P. Butler intends to purchase Lexington, Ky.-based American Founders Bank and move its headquarters to Louisville, according to a news release from the bank. [Business First]

Contractual issues between the city and the New Albany police union could be ruled upon soon. [News & Tribune]

Dan Johnson Got More Egg On His Face

Louisville Metro Council’s public safety committee voted Tuesday to send the implementation of a local needle exchange program to a full council vote. [WDRB]

The Transit Authority of River City plans to cut bus service on several key routes, effective Aug. 16, to save about $1.2 million next fiscal year. [C-J/AKN]

One week before their stories will be shared on the floor of the Supreme Court, half a dozen same-sex couples from Kentucky and their attorneys met to celebrate progress to this point, and what could be a historic decision that changes how marriage is recognized in America. [WHAS11]

Nine people were indicted Tuesday on charges of spiriting away what Kentucky authorities say was more bourbon whiskey than one person could drink in a lifetime. But, uh, we could definitely drink that in a lifetime. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A former Louisville Metro Police Department school resource officer accused of putting a student in a chokehold until he passed out has been indicted on some charges in the case. [WLKY]

You don’t have to stop recording police when they’re out and about in public. [HuffPo]

A controversial proposal to merge Louisville’s city and suburban fire departments is likely dead after its only sponsor took his name off the legislation. Way to go, Dan Johnston, you’re a shining star of intelligence these days. [WAVE3]

Detroit just had the single largest tax foreclosure in American history. As many as 100,000 of the city’s residents — about a seventh of the total number — are now on track for what many are calling an eviction “conveyer belt.” [Mother Jones]

The local health department in the Southern Indiana community battling an HIV outbreak has handed out thousands of needles to residents since an exchange program went into effect April 4. [WFPL]

You don’t understand the world you live in if you haven’t read Eric Lipton’s three-part series in the New York Times on the staggering “explosion” of relentless, grimy lobbying of state attorneys general. Lipton just won a Pulitzer Prize for his work, and it’s truly deserved: it’s a masterpiece of investigative reporting, built on diligent use of open records laws by Lipton and Times researchers. [The Intercept]

First Savings Bank might consolidate some of its operations and move its headquarters from Clarksville to Jeffersonville. [Business First]

To Austin High School Principal Sherman Smith, it’s just bullying on a bigger stage. [News & Tribune]

Making Big Moves Against Mountaintop Removal

Woah, PNC bank is tanking Mountaintop Removal seriously.

Beginning on page two of the bank’s 2015 Corporate Responsibility Report (Warning: External PDF Link — or if it’s inaccessible, we’ve archived a copy), MTR gets a mention:






Driven by environmental and health concerns, as well as our risk appetite, we introduced a mountaintop removal (MTR) financing policy in late 2010 and subsequently enhanced that policy in 2014. As a result, our MTR financing exposure has declined significantly and will continue to do so moving forward. Overall, PNC’s exposure to firms participating in MTR represents less than one-quarter of 1 percent of PNC’s total financing commitments. Under the policy, PNC will not extend credit to individual MTR mining projects or to coal producers with 25 percent or more of their production coming from MTR mining.

This is kind of a big deal. Especially in Kentucky. A state where legislative leaders still lie about the benefits of destroying mountains while personally profiting from their destruction.

Wondering how to help Kentucky’s environment? Follow PNC’s lead if you’re a big bank or business trying to be less awful. Read their report. Have some guts and stand up.

UPDATE: Seems like PNC is likely to get some 2015 Earth Day Awards nominations.

Fischer’s Cool With Giving Cordish Millions Again

Of course Greg Fischer is cool with giving away millions of tax dollars for nothing. Ultimately, Cordish never built anything. But the company is still set to receive $5.25 million from Louisville Metro government simply for walking away from the project. [WDRB]

In his first local media interview, Yum! Brands CEO Greg Creed said the planet’s largest restaurant company will remain headquartered in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another shooting, another victim identified. [WHAS11]

Following complaints that University of Louisville trustees were denied information about problems at the school, some of them are calling for changing the focus of board meetings from “ritual and ceremony” to the “business of the university.” [H-L]

Wait, wait! Here’s another murder. This time in the Portland neighborhood. [WLKY]

Some 9 million Americans could attend community college tuition-free under a proposal President Barack Obama announced Friday. [HuffPo]

A suspect in a Louisville homicide case committed suicide after a standoff with Clarksville Police Saturday. [WAVE3]

Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo Friday filed legislation authorizing the commonwealth to bond $3.3 billion in order to shore up the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement Fund. Which means way more debt to make up for existing debt. [Ronnie Ellis]

Louisville Metro employees received about $24 million in overtime payments during calendar year 2014, according to data provided by the city. [WFPL]

John David Dyche is kind of right for a change. This one’s all about Steve Beshear kicking a rusty can down the road while patting himself on the back. [BGDN]

The president of Central Bank of Jefferson County is leaving after almost 10 years to relocate to North Carolina. [Business First]

A major step toward asking taxpayers to voluntarily pay more on property taxes — in exchange for major updates to three schools — is scheduled for Monday night. [News & Tribune]

People Thought Minimum Wage Hike Would Occur?

Sure, raising the minimum wage is the right thing to do in this country. But was anyone really naïve enough to believe that this current Metro Council would be able to pull something like that off? They can’t even handle a simple Metro Animal Services investigation. [WDRB]

Everyone is freaking out about this… The Metropolitan Sewer District board Monday rejected a contract offer by a union that represents about 150 of its workers and said a key provision was illegal under state law. [C-J/AKN]

Clarksville Town Council members discussed adding the position of town manager in a session Monday evening. [WHAS11]

Following the example of Louisville and Nashville, Lexington will soon start a program to help get longtime homeless people off the streets. Earlier this month, the Urban County Council approved a three-year, $750,000 contract for the Hope Center, a homeless shelter in Lexington, to provide housing and case management to 20 people. [H-L]

Clark County’s prosecutor will seek the death penalty against a man who confessed to killing his ex-girlfriend in Jeffersonville. [WLKY]

In a rare show of defiance of the National Rifle Association, the Senate on Monday confirmed Dr. Vivek Murthy to serve as surgeon general of the United States. Murthy’s nomination had been stalled for nearly a year due to comments he made in support of stricter gun laws. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun Jefferson County Public Schools bus accident. [WAVE3]

Incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has hired a federal budget expert to join his leadership staff as a policy adviser next year. Jon Burks, who currently works as the House Budget Committee’s policy director, will be responsible for budget and appropriations issues in McConnell’s office. [The Hill]

A tribunal is expected to decide by the end of this week the fate of a Jefferson County Public Schools principal fired in October for “conduct unbecoming of a teacher.” [WFPL]

Despite warnings about abuse, Medicare covered more prescriptions for potent controlled substances in 2012 than it did in 2011. The program’s top prescribers often have faced disciplinary action or criminal charges related to their medical practices. [ProPublica]

The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating Porter Bancorp Inc., parent company of PBI Bank, for possible violations of federal law related to false bank entries and banking and securities fraud. [Business First]

A severance benefit written into a schools superintendent’s contract extension could take the spotlight at a public hearing Wednesday. [News & Tribune]

White Flighters Panicked Over Peaceful Protest

FFS, it’s not bourbon if it’s made in Indiana. [WDRB]

In responding to his most recent performance review, Metropolitan Sewer District executive director Greg Heitzman objected to the middle rating that his board gave him, an evaluation that was colored by a bitter union dispute. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police are helping make the holidays brighter for senior citizens in the community. [WHAS11]

Seems like only yesterday Steve Beshear and Jack Conway were pushing this as the second-coming. Like most economic developments Beshear touts, here’s yet another failure. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Here’s a look at panicked white flighters freaking out about a peaceful protest. If only more people had the guts Amy Rock has. [WLKY]

Isn’t it fascinating to see a bunch of fat white people freaking out about a scary black guy protesting? Because it’s obviously the best thing to do — to prosecute a protestor instead of bothering to do anything about the slaughter of poor brown people at the hands of wealthy white communities. Almost as fascinating to watch the Louisville Metro Police threaten to arrest peaceful protestors this weekend in a super-white neighborhood because some sheltered kids were scared. [HuffPo]

Six Fern Creek Traditional High School students were taken to the hospital after drinking water tainted with prescription medication. [WAVE3]

Adam Edelen is still in a pissing contest with Bobbie Coleslaw for her shady spending. [External PDF Link]

Amid national attention to police tactics across the U.S., Louisville officials are making an attempt to open up a dialogue between local police and the community. [WFPL]

Charter schools are often promoted as a tool to address educational inequities, but a potential precedent-setting legal case launched this week says the opposite. In filings with the U.S. Department of Education, two Delaware nonprofit groups allege that some of the state’s publicly funded, privately managed schools are actively resegregating the education system — and in a way that violates federal civil rights law. [David Sirota]

For nearly a decade, Maria Hampton has been the face of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in Louisville [Business First]

The lawsuit that Jeffersonville residents filed against MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. has been dropped, but a judge’s ruling Thursday and a new lawsuit against the city mean the fight is far from over. [News & Tribune]