Nothing Is Puppies & Rainbows Today!

JCTC is sending layoff notices to about 40 more people. This round of cuts impacts students in the classroom, with professor and instructor jobs eliminated. [WDRB]

As Churchill Downs nears the end of $18 million in renovations to a number of its premium seating and lounge areas, the Central Avenue track offered a glimpse inside them Tuesday to local media. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! Fun fact: People are terrible. [WHAS11]

Want to watch Steve Beshear melt down for finally being held accountable? Here’s your chance. Matt Bevin’s politics may be deplorable and he may have the intelligence of a pool of hog poop but he couldn’t in his wildest teabagger dreams come close to touching the level of corruption that controlled Beshear’s Administrat. [H-L]

Seeeeeee? People are terrible! Raping people in cemeteries. Wow. [WLKY]

Laura Bush detailed the exact moment she learned about the 9/11 terrorist attacks during an intimate conversation with her daughter. [HuffPo]

At least WAVE isn’t over-hyping this like WDRB. Have Jefferson County Public Schools gone overboard by trying to hold on to teachers by raising their pay? [WAVE3]

Former U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres has credited faith groups for helping to advance the Paris Climate Agreement by supporting “holistic, equitable, but above all, ambitious climate action.” [ThinkProgress]

The way Daphne Patton remembers it, it was more money than she’d ever seen. It was 1990, and the Kentucky Supreme Court had declared the state’s school funding system unconstitutional. Within a year, a lot more money started flowing to the poorest school districts, a 50 to 60 percent increase in their budgets. [WFPL]

Investigators probing the mysterious execution-style killings of eight family members in rural Ohio last week have found evidence of illegal cockfighting and marijuana cultivation on their property, state officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Someone’s trying to build a bunch of huts around Louisville. But these aren’t your typical huts — they’re Google Fiber huts, and this could be a sign that the city has taken a huge leap forward in the process of getting the coveted gigabit internet service. [Business First]

Two Indiana counties are seeking permission from the state to begin or continue needle exchange programs in an effort to slow the spread of hepatitis C and HIV among narcotic drug users. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it. Both CDMA and GSM options. For worriers: no, you don’t get identified to us if you use our link… so please consider letting us know if you do! [Ting]

2 Weeks Of Flaking Out Officially Begins!

Okay – was it seven or eight people who were arrested during Thunder shenanigans? [WDRB]

Thunder-goers began arriving early Saturday to set up camp for what promised to be a thrilling spectacle of an afternoon air show and a spectacular, evening fireworks display. And they weren’t disappointed. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! We’re guessing she didn’t see the Goatman. [WHAS11]

A Fayette County judge denied permission Friday for a UPS attorney to contact jurors who awarded $5.3 million to eight former and current employees over a hostile work environment at the company’s Lexington hub. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Hundreds of thousands of people were estimated to be along the river front for Thunder Over Louisville. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama revealed on Saturday that his children helped him understand why embracing civil unions was not the same as endorsing marriage equality.” [HuffPo]

The Mayor of Bardstown wrote an open letter to residents Friday as the city braces for protests. [WAVE3]

This is a story that begins with cries for help from a small town school district and ends with justice. You’ll want to read all of this. [Page One]

Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District Board is set to vote Monday on whether to approve a new plan for a stormwater storage basin in the city’s Smoketown neighborhood. The new plan — which would place the basin underground — will cost about $4.8 million more than the alternative, according to documents posted Friday by the agency. [WFPL]

Transgender Americans may find greater acceptance in the future, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll that shows young adults and women more open to people using public bathrooms matching their gender identity. [Reuters]

Greater Louisville Inc. has made one hire and one promotion to beef up its economic development team. [Business First]

Because free tools can reach more residents in times of emergency, the Sellersburg Town Council has decided not to renew its contract with alert system CodeRED. [News & Tribune]

Insanity. Is There A Full Moon Or What?

Didn’t link to any of these stories yesterday because they’re all so horrifically sad. [WDRB]

The Independent Pilots Association, the collective bargaining unit for UPS pilots, is turning up the heat on the shipping giant by opening a strike operations center in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another person dead from a gunshot in Compassionate City. [WHAS11]

Tim Longmeyer, a former secretary of the state Personnel Cabinet under former Gov. Steve Beshear, pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to bribery. [H-L]

A Jefferson County judge answered to charges of misconduct Tuesday. Judge Sheila Collins is accused of improperly jailing a victim of domestic violence who recanted her story last June. [WLKY]

Tea people just don’t like it when elected officials actually do their jobs. [HuffPo]

Decision-makers at Moore Traditional School decided not to appeal Vicki Lete’s removal as Principal of Moore Traditional School. [WAVE3]

The Kentucky Lottery has launched into online gambling, becoming the third state to offer lottery sales online after Michigan and Georgia. Minnesota implemented then banned online sales in 2015 after faith-based groups protested scratch-off sales. [More H-L]

When Aetna announced its move to buy Louisville born-and-bred insurer Humana last year, more than a few antitrust sirens sounded. [WFPL]

Former U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres has credited faith groups for helping to advance the Paris Climate Agreement by supporting “holistic, equitable, but above all, ambitious climate action.” [ThinkProgress]

Don’t expect to see Papa Johns International Inc. introduce its own pizza delivery vehicle the way Domino’s did last year. [Business First]

It’s sometimes hard for people to grasp, but New Albany is ranked in the top three in the state on a list that has nothing to do with basketball. [News & Tribune]

Another Compassionate Pedestrian Death

Another day, another pedestrian death in Compassionate City. Louisville Metro Police say a woman was killed after being hit by an SUV on Zorn Avenue. [WDRB]

Louisville Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens has been suspended from the bench as a state judicial disciplinary body considers misconduct charges against him. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO WILL EAT YOUR DATA! An agreement has been reached. Circuit Court Judge Olu Stevens will be suspended with pay while both sides settle their differences. [WHAS11]

Luxco, the St. Louis-based liquor company that markets Rebel Yell, Blood Oath and Ezra Brooks bourbons, announced Monday that it will build a $35 million, 18,000-square-foot distillery in Nelson County that is expected to be fully operational by late 2017. [H-L]

A death investigation is underway in Jennings County after a body was found in a lake. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) appeared to offer a thinly veiled rebuke of liberal economist Paul Krugman on Wednesday by highlighting a “scary” too-big-to-fail ruling from federal bank regulators. [HuffPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating after someone opened fire at an apartment that is across the street from where a child was hit and killed Friday. [WAVE3]

The Turd Cruz-Mitch McConnell slap fight is getting crazier by the minute. [The Hill]

Louisville Metro Councilwoman Jessica Green wants police officers to spend more time patrolling on foot and bike in an effort to build better relationships with communities. [WFPL]

Twelve state attorneys general have asked the federal Department of Education to revoke the recognition of the much-criticized Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. [ProPublica]

The Old Forester Distillery project will give a fresh look to some very old structures on Main Street in downtown Louisville. [Business First]

Gathered in the Nolan Solar Building, the former art students met with their teacher, chatted for a while and marveled at their finished product, a mural spanning an entire wall along a staircase. [News & Tribune]

Wait. Nope. Another Bad Week For JCPS

JCPS has received 115 calls through its bullying tipline. Fifty-two calls have come from middle schools, 31 from elementary schools, and 25 from high schools, while seven calls have come from other areas. [WDRB]

Jessica Green needs to hold Greg Fischer’s feet to the fire. She’s one of the few people who could do it and get away with it. Metro Council members blasted Mayor Greg Fischer’s administration Thursday for failing to alert them about a key vacancy on the planning commission last summer that resulted in an appointment being made without the mayor’s or council’s approval. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! An 18-year-old Jeffersontown High School student appeared in front of a judge Friday morning, charged with a felony after police say he and two other students beat another student, leaving him for dead. [WHAS11]

Just what Kentucky needs! Another tax increase. The very thing the working poor cannot afford is sales tax. [H-L]

The new and improved Speed Museum has reopened its doors. The museum had been closed for 3 1/2 years for renovations and construction of a new wing. [WLKY]

In NPI’s telling, white Americans are increasingly under siege in their own country, doomed to be a hated minority as people of color grow ever more numerous and politically powerful. And Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy has given the group’s members more hope than ever that help is on the way. [HuffPo]

There are new developments for a firefighter’s widow fighting with state government over whether her husband died in the line of duty. [WAVE3]

Kashiya Nwanguma, a student at the University of Louisville who is black, attended a Trump rally in Louisville this month, she says, to better understand the Trump phenomenon. She said in an interview this week that she suddenly felt the crowd’s attention turn to her after Trump saw the anti-Trump sign she was holding and asked that she be removed. Someone promptly snatched it out of her hand. Next, she was being roughly shoved by several white men. “I think a lot of it has to do with ignorance that’s rooted in fear of the other,” said Nwanguma, 21, when asked about the incident Thursday. “None of the people who were attacking me even knew what was on my sign. I obviously stood out in the crowd based on my appearance.” [WaPo]

Louisville has officially kicked off an education and advocacy campaign to promote the use of solar energy. [WFPL]

More than 30 states have enacted some version of voter ID law in recent years. How much do these laws change voting rules and what impact could they have on the general election? [ProPublica]

“‘Population health” has become something of a trend in the health care industry. [Business First]

The Clark County Council will vote Monday, March 14, on a budget revision to account for cuts dictated in the state certified budget order, for the sixth year in a row. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Local Repubs Love The Racist

Before she retired, Fay Allen regularly drove from her home in Jeffersonville to her job in downtown Louisville. She estimates she now makes about 10 trips a month across the Ohio River, mostly for volunteer work. [WDRB]

A day before his twins’ sixth birthday celebration, Donald Mattingly Jr., 36, was riddled with bullets. Nine months later, his killer remains free, as do those responsible for nearly half of the homicides in Louisville last year. [C-J/AKN]

Landscape awards don’t matter when your administration is a walking disaster. [WHAS11]

Donald Trump won a tight battle with U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz in Kentucky’s Republican presidential caucus late Saturday night. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Residents in one Fern Creek neighborhood are stepping up security after Metro police found a handful of belongings that were stolen. [WLKY]

Talk about breaking barriers in the world of fried chicken. [HuffPo]

Customers inside the Walgreens on the Outer Loop left in shock Thursday after a woman, upset over her transaction, started punching and biting the clerk. [WAVE3]

Heads-up, Louisville Metro Government. When homeless people cluster and set up stable tent camps, most American cities eventually send garbage men, cops, and social workers to tear the camps down, kick out the occupants, and even destroy their belongings. But in Indianapolis, such encampments are now protected from the sudden, destructive approach that so many other cities use to break up unsightly homeless communities. [ThinkProgress]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is shuttling a proposed surplus spending plan on to the full council for final approval. [WFPL]

A Louisville House Democrat filed two bills Monday in an attempt to block Gov. Matt Bevin’s plan to dismantle the state health exchange, kynect, and revamp how Kentucky delivers Medicaid. [The Morehead News]

A new rail yard on in Jeffersonville will serve as a transfer and loading terminal for Louisville & Indiana Railroad Co. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council will introduce two ordinances and one resolution at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]

School Board Made Anti-Transparency Move, Horne & Jones The Ringleaders

On Thursday, February 11th, there will be an Open Records Training Session for members of the Metro Council and their staff in Council Chambers beginning at 12:30pm. This session will be for informational and instructional purposes only and will update any changes in the Open Records Law of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It will also cover Metro Government Guidelines for Social Media. [Press Release]

Surprise! David Jones, Stephanie Horne and crew want to stifle open discussion of issues at Jefferson County Board of Education meetings. [WDRB]

The agency that Metropolitan Sewer District Executive Director Tony Parrott led in Cincinnati before coming to Louisville is going to get a state audit following a Gannett newspaper’s investigation of its finances. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting here in Compassionate City! This time it was a postal worker in the West End. [WHAS11]

Less than a week after Rand Paul ended his presidential campaign, some of the Kentucky senator’s top supporters in the state legislature have backed Marco Rubio ahead of the state’s Republican presidential caucus next month. [H-L]

What a fun day of shooting yesterday turned out to be. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton is concerned for the future of women’s reproductive rights. [HuffPo]

A new mayor was elected in Shepherdsville, hours after the former mayor resigned. [WAVE3]

Jefferson County Public Schools superintendet Donna Hargens wants authority to hire principals without Site-Based Decision-Making council input. But we discovered Hargens has a terrible track record of hiring the worst of the worst when there’s no SBDM accountability. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Federal officials say Kentucky could have to return more than $57 million in unused grant money because of Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s decision to dismantle kynect. [WFPL]

Much has been said about the dangers of oil trains following several high-profile accidents, including a fiery 2013 crash in Quebec that killed 50 people. Now a report from Greenpeace points to another potential hazard that could be even deadlier: chlorine trains. [Click the Clicky]

Louisville-based Al J. Schneider Co. has hired Louisville real estate firm CBRE Group Inc. of Louisville to assess the possible sale of its downtown Louisville office properties, which includes the 25-story Waterfront Plaza and One Riverfront Plaza on Main Street. [Business First]

River Valley Middle School eighth-graders got a close look Friday at what careers in STEM fields could look like. [News & Tribune]