New Albany Schools Have Come A Long Way

The New Albany Floyd County School board has added “sexual orientation” to its non-discrimination policy. [WDRB]

A University of Louisville study of asthma, older adults and indoor air quality is revealing a mix of potentially dangerous chemicals inside participants’ homes. [C-J/AKN]

The footage is hard to watch. “No mother ever wants to see anything like that and my daughter was clearly trying to get away from her and it hurt. It hurt a lot,” parent Valerie Gholston said. [WHAS11]

Top level administrators are being hired at the University of Kentucky at more than twice the rate of full-time faculty, according to UK employee statistics. [H-L]

Just hours after two people are arrested and brought in for questioning about a Tuesday night killing, the victim’s girlfriend hopes justice will be served. [WLKY]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Oh, right, that’s totally going to solve all of their problems. Just a few weeks after hosting a Halloween Party, a troubled motel on Bardstown Road is inviting the neighborhood over for another holiday event. [WAVE3]

Tell us more, Matt Bevin, about how great refugees have it and about how easy it is for them to find safety. LGBT refugees from across the Middle East flock to Turkey, escaping Islamist militias, sexual assault, and death threats. But what they find there leaves many in despair. [BuzzFeed]

With uncertainty about the future of his signature health initiative, Gov. Steve Beshear is touting the outcomes of Kentucky’s efforts to improve the well-being of residents. [WFPL]

More than half a dozen state governors have come out against President Obama’s plans to relocate several thousand Syrian refugees within the United States. Some have pledged to actively resist settlement of these refugees. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), for example, signed a letter to Obama that begins “as governor of Texas, I write to inform you that the State of Texas will not accept any refugees from Syria in the wake of the deadly terrorist attack in Paris.” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R) issued an executive order instructing all “departments, budget units, agencies, offices, entities, and officers of the executive branch of the State of Louisiana” to “utilize all lawful means to prevent the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the State of Louisiana while this Order is in effect.” The problem for Jindal, Abbott and the other governors opposed to admitting refugees, however, is that there is no lawful means that permits a state government to dictate immigration policy to the president in this way. [ThinkProgress]

Surprise! UofL put Deborah Dietzler on leave. [Business First]

Residents within West Clark Community Schools’ boundaries won’t just vote for a president this time next year, but also a referendum project for the district. [News & Tribune]

No, Voting Machines Are Not To Blame

Can you imagine if there were accountability like this for Jim Ramsey and the University of Louisville? Of course you can’t, don’t even try. [WDRB]

Surely no one is surprised that Greg Fischer and his crew tried to pull the wool over the eyes of everyone in the West End. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana’s first statewide program that pays for addiction and mental health treatment for convicted felons sent to community corrections instead of jail or prison is now underway. [WHAS11]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police say a 16-year-old boy stabbed his father in the chest Monday morning at a home on Saint Claire Drive. [WLKY]

When it comes to accreditors, the private organizations paid by colleges to help them maintain access to nearly $150 billion annually in federal student aid, the U.S. Department of Education seems to think sunlight is the best disinfectant. [HuffPo]

Of course John Boel is back to fearmongering. Leave it to him to try to crap all over needle exchanges. [WAVE3]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

Kentucky’s next state auditor, Danville Republican Rep. Mike Harmon, said he’s not sure if he’ll continue the investigation of the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees and its relationship with the University of Louisville Foundation, which manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment. [WFPL]

Three major companies, citing the under-representation of minorities in science and technology fields, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold affirmative action in university admissions in a closely watched case to be argued next month. [Reuters]

Almost Family Inc. has acquired Home Care by Black Stone, a Kenwood, Ohio-based nursing services provider, for $40 million. [Business First]

Community members are invited to help shape the future of their town by attending the “Envision South Clarksville” workshop for the South Clarksville Redevelopment Plan starting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, at Ohio Falls United Methodist Church, 917 S. Virginia Ave., Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

Yes, The Media’s Slut-Shaming Powell

Eric Crawford has no idea what slut-shaming is or he’s lying to you. [WDRB]

Greg Leichty donated $50 to independent Drew Curtis in Kentucky’s gubernatorial contest and plans to vote for the founder. Just don’t ask Leichty, a University of Louisville communications professor, if other like-minded liberals ought to follow his example. “I’m not recommending that other people do,” Leichty said. [C-J/AKN]

Katina Powell’s lawyer, Larry Wilder, said his client was not subpoenaed in the investigation centered around “Breaking Cardinal Rules”. [WHAS11]

The Department of Justice has reached 70 settlements involving 457 hospitals in 43 states for more than $250 million related to cardiac devices that were implanted in patients in violation of Medicare coverage requirements, the Department of Justice announced Friday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Just hours before a 19-year-old murder victim is honored, his family asks for help solving the case. [WLKY]

While much of the political attention is on the 2016 presidential race, there’s also a big election that’s not getting nearly as much coverage — and it’s taking place this week. As John Oliver pointed out on HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” this week’s election could determine who might fall into the “Medicaid Gap” in several states. [HuffPo]

It is a sad and sobering statistic. One in five women will be a victim of sexual assault in college. [WAVE3]

By the time George W Bush left the White House, perceptions of the United States in the wider world were overwhelmingly negative. As the Obama presidency enters its final phase, how have attitudes shifted? (This is about Matthew Barzun) [BBC]

The Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office has begun issuing grand jury subpoenas in connection with allegations that escorts were provided to University of Louisville men’s basketball players and recruits, according to ESPN. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s gubernatorial candidates responded to a questionnaire from Preservation Kentucky regarding Kentucky’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. [Click the Clicky]

Port of Indiana–Jeffersonville will receive $10 million in transportation grant money from the The U.S. Department of Transportation to enhance and expand the port’s infrastructure. [Business First]

Mayor Mike Moore is happy to present his record of the last four years as reason for his re-election, but challenger Dennis Julius, Jeffersonville city councilman, believes he could have done things better. [News & Tribune]

Surprise! Jim Ramsey Did A Stupid Thing

It has made headlines for crime and health violations, but Saturday brought a different view of a controversial Louisville hotel. The Economy Inn held a Halloween party. [WDRB]

The former principal of Buechel Metro High School says Jefferson County Public Schools leaders have created a false perception of his tenure as a way to demonstrate a need to merge two alternative schools and create the new Minor Daniels Academy. [C-J/AKN]

Metro Police are investigating a shooting that happened just south of downtown. [WHAS11]

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton Jr. has stepped in, after months of back-and-forth between Jefferson District and Family courts over which would take on the additional workload of new Emergency Protective Orders meant to protect dating couples from an abusive partner. [H-L]

Louisville Metro Police are conducting a death investigation after a was body found Saturday morning near Frost Middle School. [WLKY]

Triple Crown champion American Pharoah took charge out of the gate, winning the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 1/2 lengths Saturday in his final race before retirement. [HuffPo]

On Tuesday New Albany voters will decide who should lead the city. There will be three names to chose from – the incumbent, a real estate developer or a businessman. [WAVE3]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

Everyone keeps begging us to write about Jim Ramsey’s latest racist stunt. If this is what sets everyone on fire over Jimbo and his mess, something’s gone terribly wrong. The man has been in a literal pile of corrupt shit since 2008. Felner and the rest of the folks have thieved, done prison time, gotten away with everything while Ramsey turned a blind eye. Shirley Dubya? She’s currently being paid more than $300,000 to do nothing for a year. The myriad Rick Pitino sex scandals? Just blips on the radar. But the man shows his true colors by dressing in a demeaning and racist way? That’s what sets fire to him and causes rage to bubble to the surface? We’re tired. [WFPL]

Amid the recent pressure on police to wear body cameras, one thing is often overlooked: Not all cameras are created equal. In fact, cameras vary a lot — and the variations — some contentious — can have a profound effect on how the cameras are used and who benefits from them. [NPR]

The U.S. Justice Department has rejected a settlement offer from AB Electrolux that would have allowed the company to move ahead with its acquisition of Louisville-based GE Appliances. [Business First]

While candidates for Charlestown’s city council come from different parts of the area and different political parties, they all envision a growing Charlestown. That’s because with the River Ridge Commerce Center and the east-end bridge, the city can’t escape changes. But how the city can take advantage of those changes is where the candidates from the city’s four districts differ. The most talked about issues include the future of the Pleasant Ridge Subdivision and they city’s battle with brown water. [News & Tribune]

Woah, This Is Clarksville’s First Black Cop?!

Community leaders and parents are saying enough is enough with all the recent violence in Louisville. [WDRB]

Four Louisville Metro Council members are pooling their resources to hire former Democratic Caucus Director Elizabeth Hoffman for an unspecified role in City Hall less than a month after she was fired. [C-J/AKN]

Seriously? Not even a mention of failing a polygraph being essentially meaningless? And we’re supposed to trust the teevee folks. [WHAS11]

ESPN reported Tuesday that five former University of Louisville basketball players and recruits told their “Outside the Lines” reporters that they attended parties at a campus dorm from 2010-14 that included strippers. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Months after Crystal Rogers, 35, a mother of five disappears, new details are emerging about the case. [WLKY]

A key House Democrat suggested Monday that Vice President Joe Biden can’t win the Democratic nomination on his own and should not enter the contest. [HuffPo]

Thanks to a $250,000 grant, the Clarksville Police Department has hired three new officers, including the first African American to serve on the force. [WAVE3]

The two women who want to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor offered sharply contrasting views on education and economic policies in a televised debate on Kentucky Education Television Monday evening. [Ronnie Ellis]

Nearly 1,000 local leaders and neighborhood revitalization advocates from across the nation are in Louisville this week for the annual NeighborWorks America Community Leadership Institute. [WFPL]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has granted Kentucky a one-year extension for meeting requirements of the stringent new identification security law known as REAL ID – meaning a Kentucky driver’s license is still sufficient for gaining access to the vast majority of federal installations. [Press Release]

The Courier-Journal’s horse racing reporter, Jennie Rees, who’s been with the paper for 34 years, will leave after accepting a buyout offer from the paper’s parent company. [Business First]

After three city department heads decried the measure, New Albany City Councilman Kevin Zurschmiede pulled his ordinance to adopt the International Property Maintenance Code on Thursday night. [News & Tribune]

Now The KSB Is On A PR Spin Push

The Kentucky School for the Blind brings visually impaired kids together with a day of fun outside on the track. [WDRB]

Louisville isn’t green yet, another study concludes. As green as city officials like to call Louisville, studies continue to show we rank poorly in a number of environmental indicators — the latest coming from a personal finance website, WalletHub. [C-J/AKN]

If you have any concerns about the proposed methane plant in West Louisville, then mark your calendars for a chance to weigh in. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Kentucky’s Democratic governor to weigh in on whether altered marriage licenses issued by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis’ office are valid. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The investigation continues into a body that was found Tuesday in a box in the Fairdale area. [WLKY]

Just like the Islamic State, radical domestic hate groups can use social media to spread messages and inspire attacks in the United States, a top counterterrorism official said Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The search continues for two men accused of beating up a man on his bicycle who says he was just minding his own business. It happened last month along Dixie Highway. A restaurant server witnessed the attack and was able to stop it. According to the police report, they just started punching him and kicking him for no apparent reason. [WAVE3]

From his first days as commander in chief, the drone has been President Barack Obama’s weapon of choice, used by the military and the CIA to hunt down and kill the people his administration has deemed — through secretive processes, without indictment or trial — worthy of execution. There has been intense focus on the technology of remote killing, but that often serves as a surrogate for what should be a broader examination of the state’s power over life and death. [The Intercept]

David Jones knew there was extensive unrest. Stephanie Horne knew there was extensive unrest. But Jones is being pretty honest while Horne is feigning surprise. A real shame the community doesn’t get better representation on the board. [WFPL]

University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto has a small army of recruiters who blanket the state to persuade high school students to attend the state’s flagship university. [Ashland Independent]

Kroger Co. is the nation’s largest supermarket chain, and now it’s claiming another title, Forbes reports. The Cincinnati-based grocer will begin offering transgender workers full health benefits on Jan. 1, including surgery and drug therapy for gender reassignment. The move makes Kroger, the nation’s fifth-largest employer, the largest retail chain to offer such benefits to its employees. [Business First]

Floyd County is not immune to the heroin problem in Southern Indiana. And with the drug use comes another issue — discarded syringes and needles being thrown in streets and yards. [News & Tribune]

Closing Bars At 2:00 A.M. Is Just Silly

Sometimes what’s not your fault becomes your problem. “If they’re going to make these decisions, then they need to be held responsible for them, and not us,” said Wes Stafford, a Hillview resident. “They’re going to cover their tail by passing it off to us. We don’t like that.” [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer is asking community leaders to take a tour of Heaven Hill’s distillery in western Louisville next month to educate them about the organic waste material that will be used at a proposed methane plant. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police investigating a person’s death after a shooting in Old Louisville Sunday evening. [WHAS11]

When visitors descend on Lexington in late October for the Breeders’ Cup, they will be here primarily for the finest Thoroughbreds in the world. But they should stick around after the races to see what else the commonwealth has to offer. And there’s plenty. [H-L]

There will be no layoffs at Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville. The Community Services Program provides assistance to low-income families. At a special meeting of the Metro Council, council members learned that the proposal to lay off employees has been rescinded. [WLKY]

Louisville can definitely handle a public market like this. For nearly four decades, the Union Square Greenmarket has served as a grand bazaar in Lower Manhattan, where produce, baked goods, flowers and foodstuffs are hauled in from the countryside (or some Brooklyn bakery) four days a week. And almost anyone can afford to shop there. [HuffPo]

A party is creating an uproar on social media for what’s being called a lack of respect for the dead. Pictures of the party’s setup near or in a cemetery have been shared dozens of times on Facebook. People who have worked to keep up the abandoned Eastern Cemetery on Baxter Avenue say it’s the latest insult to the people buried there. [WAVE3]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Some bar owners in Louisville say the city’s burgeoning bourbon and food scene could take a hit if the Metro Council changes closing times from 4 a.m. to 2 a.m. But leave it to Tom Owen to do something dumb. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

Generation Tux, the startup online tuxedo rental company, could end up bringing more than the 80 jobs originally planned to Louisville, the company’s chief technology officer, Matt Howland, said in an interview with Louisville Business First Thursday. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court upheld a Floyd County court’s decision to sentence a Southern Indiana man to the death penalty Thursday following his conviction for brutally murdering his mother’s friend in April 2012. [News & Tribune]