The Weekend: Just A Shooting Spree

Louisville Metro Police spokesperson Carey Klain says a total of four people were shot during two separate weekend incidents. Nothing to see here, move along. [WDRB]

Here are some changes in Jefferson County schools that students and parents should know before classes start up again. [C-J/AKN]

Three lucky Louisville birds saw a new beginning Friday, July 24. The Raptor Rehabilitation of Kentucky Inc., or RROKI, released three Peregrine Falcons at Hayes Kennedy Park after months of rehabilitation. [WHAS11]

A bunch of fat, racist, white guys played dress-up on Friday and showed their true colors. Kentucky’s state government should not turn its back on Confederate symbols, including the “stars and bars” battle flag and Jefferson Davis, speakers told more than a hundred people at a “Southern pride” rally outside the Capitol Friday. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! If you love stories about shootings that your elected leadership is desperate to ignore, here’s another. [WLKY]

Americans’ views of Sen. Bernie Sanders have grown more favorable as they continue to learn more about him, according to a new Gallup poll. [HuffPo]

Where is Blue? Can’t he buy this, tear it down and pave things over for a parking lot? Could operate a shuttle service to the new Costco. [WAVE3]

Despite widespread belief to the contrary, no federal law explicitly protects LGBT people from discrimination. Thursday marks the introduction of The Equality Act, a comprehensive bill that would, if passed, add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protections that already exist based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. But it also would do more than that. [ThinkProgress]

The idea of converting downtown Louisville’s one-way streets to two-ways has support from business proponents, but motor vehicles aren’t the only way to get around the city. [WFPL]

The H-2 visa program invites foreign workers to do some of the most menial labor in America. Then it leaves them at the mercy of their employers. Thousands of these workers have been abused — deprived of their fair pay, imprisoned, starved, beaten, raped, and threatened with deportation if they dare complain. And the government says it can do little to help. [BuzzFeed]

Louisville-based Almost Family Inc. (NYSE: AFAM) announced plans to purchase Jacksonville, Fla.-based Ingenios Health Co. Ingenios provides in-home clinical assessments for Medicare Advantage, Medicaid and others in seven states and in Washington D.C. [Business First]

One candidate has been tabbed and another will soon be selected to fill vacated positions in upcoming New Albany City Council races. [News & Tribune]

Seeing “Cordish” Is Like Seeing A Big Car Crash On The Side Of The Road

Because the company doesn’t investigate, it just covers things up and pays people off. However, Smith refused to explain how the company investigated the allegations on their own. “I will not go into that,” Smith said when he was asked how the company does it’s own investigations. [WDRB]

Dismayed by allegations of racial discrimination at 4th Street Live, activists denounced the entertainment district and its developer on Wednesday, suggesting that the developer has some civil rights groups in its pocket. [C-J/AKN]

The person police said is behind a threatening note left at the Louisville Jewish Community Center is now behind bars. [WHAS11]

Brown-Forman CEO Paul Varga said Wednesday that the company aspires to grow Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, the Herradura tequila family and other major labels into billion-dollar brands. [H-L]

Property owners near GE Appliance Park have until Saturday, Aug. 1 to submit claims for cleanup costs related to April’s six-alarm fire. [WLKY]

It’s a whole new day for Republican presidential contenders making their second bid for the White House. Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is making serious efforts to woo black voters, and is becoming one of the fiercest critics of real estate mogul Donald Trump. Meanwhile former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, known for his stringent opposition to same-sex marriage, is softening his rhetoric about gay people. [HuffPo]

What the hell is wrong with people? A dog left inside a car in the hot sun died from heat exhaustion, leading to the arrest of an Oldham County woman. [WAVE3]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

Barry Barker would rather not talk about some buses in TARC’s fleet. They’re buses like the one Metro Councilman Tom Owen rode into downtown early Tuesday morning. That bus stalled and had to be banged, slammed and shoved by the driver to get running again, Owen said. [WFPL]

Even as immigration remains a hot topic in the U.S. presidential campaign, the number of people emigrating from Mexico to the United States, legally and illegally, has dropped sharply in recent years, research published Wednesday shows. [Reuters]

U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best Hospitals List Tuesday, which ranks hospitals on medical specialties such as cancer, cardiology, orthopedics and so on. [Business First]

The state will pay $124,500 to end a lawsuit brought by a man who wasn’t provided with a sign language interpreter during his mother’s criminal hearings in 2010 and 2011. In March, the U.S. District Court Southern District of Indiana in New Albany found in favor of Steven Prakel after he claimed courts and judges in Dearborn County failed to hire an interpreter during his mother’s hearings related to operating a vehicle while intoxicated and driving on a suspended license charges. [News & Tribune]

Cordish Fun Just Keeps Getting Better

JCPS students head back to class in less than a month, and the city of Louisville wants to make sure they’re prepared. [WDRB]

You can thank Jerry Abramson and Jim King (along with a little bit of David Tandy) for allowing Cordish to become a thing in Louisville. Fourth Street Live developer Cordish Co. is accused in a scathing consultants’ report of targeting African Americans to keep them out of the popular downtown entertainment district and another venue it runs in Missouri. [C-J/AKN]

Friday, a settlement from Metro Louisville, a man who was a Lt. Col. in the National Guard, with a traumatic brain injury, says he was treated like a pan-handler by Louisville Metro Police. [WHAS11]

University of Louisville trustees scaled back a merit raise for school President James Ramsey, whose million-dollar-plus compensation has drawn criticism from some trustees and faculty. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA CAP! Arson investigators say they have a list of potential suspects in a deadly Old Louisville fire. [WLKY]

Last year was likely the warmest year since 1880, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration confirmed on Thursday in a report written by hundreds of scientists from 58 countries. [HuffPo]

Louisville loves killing people and this weekend was no exception. Seven people suffered what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries in a shooting inside a Louisville nightclub early Sunday morning, Louisville Metro Police Department spokesman Dwight Mitchell said. [WAVE3]

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has ruled that existing civil rights law bars sexual orientation-based employment discrimination — a groundbreaking decision to advance legal protections for gay, lesbian, and bisexual workers. [BuzzFeed]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees is giving President James Ramsey a hefty 25 percent bonus and 3 percent raise. [WFPL]

Charter Communications is ramping up its Washington lobbying operations as the telecommunications firm makes its case to regulators reviewing its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable. [The Hill]

Greg Fischer made another appeal Friday for citizens or businesses to submit proposals for the potential reuse and relocation of the former Louisville Water Co. building on South Third Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Liberty Street. [Business First]

The Clark County Commissioners scheduled a public hearing on whether to adopt an HIV and hepatitis C epidemic declaration made by the Clark County health officer. [News & Tribune]

Will Jimbo’s House Of Cards Tumble?

Over the last several months, University of Louisville President James Ramsey has insisted that multi-million-dollar deferred compensation packages he and his top aides have received from the school’s $1.1 billion foundation were implemented with the full knowledge and consent of U of L’s Board of Trustees. [WDRB]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey last year was paid 2 ½ times more than the average of the Atlantic Coast Conference’s other 14 presidents and chancellors — all of whose universities are ranked far higher academically than U of L. [C-J/AKN]

Really, why in the piss is this news? Just an attempt to embarrass the man? What? This bullshit of eating each other alive in the local media has got to stop at some point. [WHAS11]

Last spring, Marc H. Morial, the president of the National Urban League, found himself in a place he has come to know well over the years, across a desk from Sen. Mitch Mc-Connell, the majority leader, talking about public policy. [H-L]

If it’s not terrifying weather or water main break, it’s a gas line rupture. [WLKY]

It’s no secret that Jennifer Lawrence loves food, and by now, everyone should be familiar with her thoughts on dieting (“If anybody even tries to whisper the word ‘diet,’ I’m like, ‘You can go fuck yourself'”). [HuffPo]

The new bridge being constructed in downtown Louisville to carry I-65 traffic is expected to be open to drivers in less than six months. [WAVE3]

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took swipes at Wall Street and her Republican rivals on Monday, promising to impose tougher regulations on banks and raise the wages of ordinary Americans if she wins the 2016 White House race. [Reuters]

Louisville Public Media announced on Monday that Stephen George has been named the organization’s executive editor. Does this mean the sexist mess that’s caused everyone else to quit will be out the door soon? [WFPL]

House leaders are considering sweeping changes to Congress’ reimbursement requirements in the wake of the Aaron Schock scandal, including forcing lawmakers to provide more detailed documentation about how they spend taxpayer money and disclosing those details to the public. [Politico]

Mid City Mall’s look is outdated, but planned upgrades are aimed at bringing the Highlands shopping center’s look into the 21st century. [Business First]

Fun in the sun doesn’t have to end when school begins. The Clarksville Aquatic Center might be getting a $3.5 million revamp that would allow the facility to stay open longer, change and keep some of its features and cut down on operational costs. [News & Tribune]

All Of The Most Compassionate Deaths

Even before a pontoon boat struck a barge on the Ohio River on July 4, killing five people in Louisville, Kentucky was on pace to have the most boating-related deaths since 2010, federal and state data show. [WDRB]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

The NAACP is calling out the governor for his decision to not reappoint the only African-American of UofL’s Board of Trustees. Raoul Cunningham said this makes the first time in 45 years that there is not an African-American on the 17-member board. [WHAS11]

If this is the worst thing Kentucky Democrats can come up with, they probably ought to just hand over the governor’s mansion. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One week after flames tore through a building in Old Louisville, more information on the investigation has been released. [WLKY]

Kim Davis is officially a national embarrassment. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson County Public School teacher has been fired following an investigation into a inappropriate relationship with a student. [WAVE3]

Heroin use in the US has surged in the past decade as experts say people using opioid painkillers are increasingly turning to heroin as a cheaper high. [BBC]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

There’s reason to celebrate declines in deaths from colon cancer in the United States — unless you live in three areas that are still lagging behind, a new report finds. Hint: This is bad news for Kentucky. [CBS News]

Kentucky’s Innovation Center, an economic development arm for the University of Louisville Foundation, announced that it is in the process of transforming a rundown nightclub spot at 252 E. Market St. into a new home for Code Louisville, a code training program operated by KentuckianaWorks, and a new coding boot camp run by The Learning House Inc., an education technology provider. [Business First]

This is a thing you should do in Indiana. On Saturday, July 11, the Georgetown Twin Drive-In Theater is opening its gates to four-legged family members, allowing dogs on a leash to attend for a $2 admission fee. [News & Tribune]

No Compassion, No Transparency

Three Louisville lawmakers wrote a letter to Jefferson County Public Schools superintendent Donna Hargens on Monday raising “grave concerns” over the hiring of the district’s former lawyer as a teacher at Central High School. [WDRB]

First, Scott County became the epicenter of Indiana’s largest-ever HIV outbreak. Now, the health officer in the next county south — Clark — says he is leaning toward declaring a public health emergency given high rates of HIV and hepatitis C there. [C-J/AKN]

This is why we can’t have nice things, Louisville. [WHAS11]

The Herald-Leader just highlighted why it may not be a bad thing to let Republicans to take control of the statehouse. A couple years out of power would result in a number of Democratic resignations in leadership, a bunch of corrupt actors could be weeded out, giving the younger generations time to get their act together to once again lead. [H-L]

Murders happen on a seemingly daily basis but Greg Fischer’s still going on about compassionate this, compassionate that. [WLKY]

At no point in recent memory have consumers been as excited about bourbon as they are today. [HuffPo]

Eight shootings in a single weekend. Jones was shot and killed Saturday evening outside his home, one of eight weekend shootings that Louisville Metro Police are investigating. Jones and two other people, including a Louisville musician and a 60-year-old woman, died of their injuries. [WAVE3]

More than 150,000 U.S. families are homeless each year. The number has been going down, in part because of a program known as rapid rehousing, which quickly moves families out of shelters and into homes. [NPR]

Louisville firefighters will monitor through the night three historic Whiskey Row buildings that were extensively damaged by fire Monday afternoon. [WFPL]

Universal child care is becoming a central pillar of the liberal agenda — one that, if it is ever realized, could take its place alongside some of the great progressive reforms of the 20th Century, and possibly the Affordable Care Act, as a defining achievement of the Democratic Party. [WaPo]

The Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission voted 3-2 to negotiate with OTH Development LLC to develop a former American Legion property in the city. [Business First]

Utility companies that will be relocating infrastructure for the 10th Street widening project at their own cost want further assurance from the city that the project’s actually happening. [News & Tribune]

The Minimum Wage Meltdown Isn’t Over

Community leaders began searching for information Wednesday night regarding who was responsible in the hit and run death of Deniesha Pugh. [WDRB]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Agencies, hospitals and schools across Kentuckiana that serve children with special needs were notified by the WHAS Crusade for Children this week that their grant requests will be funded from the money collected during the 62nd annual WHAS Crusade for Children. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate heard arguments Wednesday in an instant-racing lawsuit on a motion by the Family Foundation to have an in-court demonstration of the electronic games based on past horse races. [H-L]

Bourbon lovers can get their hands on a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle without having to wait for hours as Liquor Barn celebrates the grand opening of two new locations. [WLKY]

U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. The numbers reflect a job market moving close to full health and raise expectations that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates as early as September. [HuffPo]

Thousands of workers will receive a 50-cent increase in their hourly pay Wednesday as Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance goes into effect, even as a lawsuit against the city continues. [WAVE3]

Senator Mitch McConnell is standing by his call to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol Rotunda. [More WDRB]

The first phase of Louisville’s minimum wage increase went into effect Wednesday. [WFPL]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. [News & Tribune]