Louisville Streets Have Always Been Pothole City

After an abrupt change in leadership for Jeffersonville Police, the new chief appointed is making history and says he is ready to take charge. [WDRB]

Jeffersonville Police Chief Chris Grimm was ousted from the position Monday by Mayor Mike Moore, who attributed the demotion only to a “new direction in the police department,” according to a news release. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky State Auditor Adam Edelen has described the financial practices of the city of West Buechel as “astounding and highly irregular. [WHAS11]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has ruled in favor of a newspaper seeking police records. [H-L]

A JCPS teacher accused of sex crimes with a child wants his trial delayed. [WLKY]

The tide has turned for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender couples seeking to be married in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A). [HuffPo]

Metro government has gotten more than 1,000 reports of potholes in the past three days as winter quickly gave way to warmer weather. [WAVE3]

But none of the top candidates in this field gets within 10 points of Hillary Clinton in a series of hypothetical general election matchups. Rand Paul comes closest, with 43% saying they’d be more likely to back him while 54% choose Clinton. [CNN]

A week after announcing the receipt of $6.3 million from the foundations of businessmen “Papa” John Schnatter and Charles Koch, the University of Louisville has released the underlying seven-year agreements. Rebecca Peek, a U of L senior and member of the Student Labor Action Project, said she was ashamed of the school’s agreement. [WFPL]

The U.S. government is preparing to roll back a widely criticized approach to public health, in which the “lost pleasure” people might suffer if they quit smoking or chose to eat healthier foods was used to reduce the projected benefits of new regulations, government officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

This time next year, the new Speed Art Museum will be open for business. [Business First]

Former Jeffersonville City Councilman John Perkins’ name is back on the ballot for the May primary election, following a circuit court’s decision. [News & Tribune]

Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

A Million Bucks To Study Louisville’s Character

A new grant will help protect JCPS student athletes while they’re playing sports. The grant was officially accepted by JCPS during a board meeting on Monday night. [WDRB]

National preservationists will spend $1 million over the next three years to study Louisville, devising plans to help preserve smaller buildings in “character-rich” areas and neighborhoods and promote healthy, urban living. [C-J/AKN]

On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. [WHAS11]

Really? We’re now just going to spread Kentucky Lottery games to the internet? What was that, again, about online gambling being the devil? [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When will all of these murders end? Louisville Metro Police are investigating a fatal shooting in South Louisville and the victim has been identified. [WLKY]

On March 22, 1991, a visibly shaken and angered President George H.W. Bush said he was “sickened and outraged” by what he saw on television. That was the beating of black motorist Rodney King by a swarm of LAPD cops. A year later, following the acquittal of four LAPD cops by a Simi Valley jury with no blacks on it, Bush ordered then-Attorney General William Barr to begin the process of slapping federal civil rights charges on the four officers. [HuffPo]

Is Bobby Flay moving closer to buying a property in Louisville for a new restaurant? [WAVE3]

You can say a lot of things about the U.S. Congress. One thing you can’t really say, though, is that they’v(sic) been in Washington way too long. [WaPo]

When Polish artist Jakub Szczęsny arrived at the GE FirstBuild factory two weeks ago as the company’s first artist in residence, he expected his first day at work to play out like a scene from a mad scientist’s lab in American film. [WFPL]

A Seattle police plan to outfit officers with body cameras was back on for early December after the agency struck an unusual deal with an anonymous programmer whose massive public-records requests threatened to cripple the program, police said on Friday. [Reuters]

A Louisville-based farm has been named the agribusiness of the year in the Kentuckiana region. [Business First]

Removing legal jargon and condensing the city’s property codes into a concise form is the main purpose behind an ordinance that could be introduced by the New Albany City Council next month. [News & Tribune]

MSD & LWC Will Probably Ruin Everything Forever

Tucked away off a busy stretch of main street, a small driveway leads to an urban mural. [WDRB]

A full merger of the Louisville Water Co. and the Metropolitan Sewer District into a “One Water” agency as once envisioned by Mayor Greg Fischer would be a tremendous challenge and not recommended, Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell has concluded. But Greg Fischer is still a brilliant leader with great leadership ability? That merger was all his idea. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Many in Louisville gave their time over the weekend to honor those who have died and those who currently fight for our country. [WHAS11]

Cello, a female German Shepherd, is in a Louisville veterinary hospital, fighting to recover from a gunshot wound to her head and other serious injuries while authorities in Eastern Kentucky search for the person who attacked her. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Oh god! The snow! Everybody freak out and go to Kroger just in case. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama showed no signs of backing down from executive action on immigration reform on Wednesday, despite a Republican wave that ripped control of the U.S. Senate away from Democrats the night before. [HuffPo]

A vigil was held on Sunday, the 10th anniversary of the shooting death of John Shofner English, where his family pleaded for answers and for the men involved to turn themselves in. [WAVE3]

Federal investigators found rampant nepotism in recent years within the agency that oversees U.S. immigration courts, including three top officials who used their positions to help relatives land paid internships. [WaPo]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is asking the public to weigh in Monday on a proposal to raise the local minimum wage. [WFPL]

On Thursday, a federal appeals court upheld bans on gay marriage in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Michigan. In a 2-1 vote, the 6th Circuit reversed lower courts’ rulings which had found the bans unconstitutional and sets up a likely Supreme Court showdown. Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey issued a scathing dissent. [Mother Jones]

After playing an exhibition game in Louisville earlier this year, the Miami Heat has expressed interest in coming back again. [Business First]

One of the oldest businesses in New Albany will close its doors after 134 years [News & Tribune]

Will A Food Hub Change Louisville’s West End?

Weeds growing between the concrete, broken chain linked fences, and crumbled bricks. It’s the site of a former tobacco plant. [WDRB]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is poised to vote Monday on this school year’s $1.3 billion working budget, which includes money for school-based mental health counselors and “transition centers” at middle and high schools. [C-J/AKN]

This will likely make people even more fearful of TARC. [WHAS11]

A federal bankruptcy judge has set a hearing in the long-running case of the now-defunct Decker College. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Louisville man is literally changing the facades of Louisville, one building at a time, and he’s doing it with one hand. [WLKY]

Lifting a ban on blood donations from gay men would increase the amount of available blood by hundreds of thousands of pints (liters) each year and save more than a million lives a year, a California study showed on Friday. [HuffPo]

The White House’s top drug policy adviser took a trip to the Commonwealth Saturday. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell is hardly a lovable guy. The Republican leader in the U.S. Senate has a dour public persona and many of his constituents don’t view him as a “real Kentuckian,” according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll that underscores what his election campaign already knows – McConnell has an image problem. [Reuters]

Fall officially begins Tuesday, and Jefferson County’s Solid Waste Authority is hoping it’ll be a good season to change the way county residents bag their leaves. [WFPL]

Fifty years after Freedom Summer, two Mississippi sisters press the fight for voting rights. [ProPublica]

A law and medicine professor at the University of Louisville has received a $612,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to further international partnerships on genetic research. [Business First]

Really? This is in poor taste? Because we can think of a million other things that are in poor taste for Clark County. [News & Tribune]