Greg Fischer: He’s The Opposite Of Transparent

The city of Jeffersonville is changing its plans for a marina that’s been vacant since the first of the year, after construction bids were more expensive than expected. [WDRB]

Chris declined to comment if Kindred had asked the city for financial incentives to assist its project. Because he can’t be caught being transparent with taxpayers and his former employer, the paper, can never be caught pressing him to open up. [C-J/AKN]

An infant was shot and killed and another person was injured after a shooting in the 110 block of South 37th Street, close to Market Street. [WHAS11]

Lexington hopes to have its first “Housing First” program that would provide permanent housing to about 20 homeless people by the end of the year. [H-L]

Local organizations met Wednesday at the VA Medical Center on Zorn Avenue to find ways to help homeless veterans in Louisville. [WLKY]

Lexington is apparently one of the ten cities with the highest quality of life. [HuffPo]

It was called Frost Middle School, one of Jefferson County’s most low performing schools, but that all is gone. In its place is the new Robert Frost 6th Grade Academy. [WAVE3]

Cowboy boots and denim jeans. That’s all that was new here Tuesday as Mitch McConnell and Alison Lundergan Grimes squared off before more than 500 at the Red, White and Blue Picnic on the grounds of the Daviess County Courthouse in sweltering, mid-90 degree heat. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, Jeffersonville unveiled large-scale, wood models of the first piece commissioned by a community, civic and private initiative focused on developing public art in the Southern Indiana city. [WFPL]

“There’s only one thing Barack Obama needs to keep his grip on power,” Mitch McConnell said, his voice cracking amid the applause. “He needs the U.S. Senate!” [NY Times]

Ghislain d’Humieres, the director of the Speed Art Museum, has seen how the other half lives through many trips abroad. [Business First]

With a promise of 82 jobs to be added over the next three years, the New Albany City Council approved tax abatements for three companies . [News & Tribune]

Corrupt UofL Honchos Still Fighting Transparency

Storm and tornado-resistant homes being built at the site of former public housing in Louisville. Right now, multi-million dollar development is under construction in the Smoketown neighborhood. [WDRB]

A federal judge today ruled that same-sex couples have a right to marry in Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

The Louisville Slugger Museum is extending its hours during the summer and discounting the price during them. [WHAS11]

Hal Rogers should support funding for syringe access to help fight the heroin plague. But he won’t because he’s both a dishonest coward and someone who allows his backwater ignorance to prevent him from common sense decisions. [H-L]

TARC says it’s coming to the rescue for drivers concerned with the upcoming closure of the Clark Memorial Bridge. [WLKY]

The state attorney general’s office has asked University of Louisville to explain why it still won’t release a high-profile audit that examined the school’s financial controls. The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting has sought a copy of the report since April and last month filed an appeal with the attorney general following the university’s denial of a public records request. [Kristina Goetz]

Will these senseless shootings in the West End ever stop? [WAVE3]

Starting in August, the Obama administration will dramatically revamp and cut back the formula it uses to send transportation funds to the states unless Congress replenishes the Highway Trust Fund. [HuffPo]

A regional study says Kentucky public school students have more access to arts education programs than students in nine other southeastern states, but Kentucky Arts Council officials question the data used in the report. [WFPL]

Congressman John Yarmuth on immigration reform: “Every day we wait to fix our broken immigration system, more families are separated, businesses face continued uncertainty, and we miss out on new economic opportunities. The Senate has already acted, and I’m extremely disappointed that Speaker Boehner is bending to a minority of House Republicans and blocking a vote on commonsense, comprehensive immigration reform, which I believe would pass the House tomorrow.” [Press Release]

A week from today, the Clark Memorial Bridge will be closed for six weeks. As a way to ease congestion during the closure, the Ohio River Bridges Project and Transit Authority of River City are encouraging residents to ride the bus. [Business First]

It is now easier for Hoosiers to find out where methamphetamine activity is taking place in their communities. [News & Tribune]

WDRB Spreading Race-Baiting Hype. Again.

A Northern Kentucky city sued the Kentucky Retirement Systems Monday over what it described as “illegal and imprudent investments” involving hundreds of millions of dollars in public pension money. In its lawsuit, filed in Kenton Circuit Court, the city of Fort Wright said KRS violates the law with risky investments in hedge funds, venture capital funds, private equity funds, leveraged buyout funds and other “alternative investments” that have produced small returns and excessive management fees, possibly in excess of $50 million over the last five years. [John Cheves]

John David Dyche loves race-baiting. And ignorant — because that’s what he is, purposefully ignorant — keeping schools racially integrated improving education. He apparently hasn’t read any of the big stories from the past several weeks on race, education and the south. At least he cares enough to try to talk about some of these things and that’s more than we can say for 99% of people. [WDRB]

The Louisville area is the 17th-deadliest metropolitan area for pedestrians, according to a new study from the National Complete Streets Coalition, a Washington D.C.-based organization that examined fatal wreck data in the country’s 51 largest metro areas. [C-J/AKN]

This is apparently the most important thing happening in Louisville. Have you heard about the social media phenomenon called hidden cash? [WHAS11]

Over the years, under both Republican and Democratic administrations, we’ve made progress in protecting our air and water from harmful mercury, arsenic, soot and other types of pollutants. Every time we’ve done it, people have claimed the economic costs weren’t worth the health and environmental benefits. They’ve been wrong every time because the higher standards sparked innovations in new technologies and ways of doing business that increased growth and created jobs. [Bill Clinton]

Five men have filed a lawsuit against the operators of Fourth Street Live, alleging they were denied entry because of their race. This Cordish nonsense needs to end. [WLKY]

Locals can definitely relate to this. Viewers aren’t the only ones disappointed with local news these days. [HuffPo]

Kentucky business groups said Monday that a federal proposal to reduce carbon emissions at power plants would lead to higher utility bills and scare companies from the state. But that’s only one slanted part of the story. [WAVE3]

Will these Louisville and Lexington leaders also bring back tips for corrupt administrations? Because Charlotte’s mayor is in a heap of legal trouble. [Business First]

Or maybe they’ll learn how to write and push bills to charge police officers and fire fighters for disclosing fracking checmicals. [Mother Jones]

Local arts organizations that receive funding through the Kentucky Arts Partnership grants could see significant cuts in support for the next fiscal year. [WFPL]

The University of Kentucky has received a $1.9 million grant to graduate more students in the STEM disciplines: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. [H-L]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Jeffersonville attorney Brad Jacobs has entered the race for Clark County Circuit County No. 2 judge. [News & Tribune]

Selective Parent Outrage Makes For Eye Rolls

Louisville entrepreneur Kent Oyler has been named the next president and CEO of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce. [WDRB]

When it comes to fitness, Louisville is huffing and puffing far behind its peers. The American College of Sports Medicine ranked the area a lowly 49th for fitness among the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas in its just-released 2014 American Fitness Index, which combines health behaviors, rates of chronic health problems, and community indicators such as recreational facilities and farmers’ markets. [C-J/AKN]

The Jefferson County Public Schools board approved a $1.3 billion budget for the 2014-2015 school year late Tuesday night and the district said the focus is to shift spending from administration to schools and classrooms. [WHAS11]

Darell Hammond of “KaBoom!” is partnering with the Humana Foundation to develop a national movement called Playful City USA, which honors communities that give kids easy access to play. [NPR]

Metro Animal Services continues to refuse to provide us with information so we may promote events like this. Because Margaret Brosko may just be the laziest (more on her in the coming days) Metro Government employee on the taxpayer dime. [WLKY]

The Danville City Commission on Tuesday created an exemption for a social services organization that said it would sue if the city passes an ordinance prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Because some backwater yokel rednecks can’t imagine living in a world where it’s illegal to discriminate against others based on your own ignorant fears. [H-L]

Dozens of parents are angry after they were told they would not be allowed at their children’s school during field day. But the principal of the school said it’s some of the parents that are to blame for the ban. Really, taking your kid to Kentucky Kingdom instead of sending them to school? Great parenting. [WAVE3]

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis released its quarterly banking performance for Louisville banks last week. [Business First]

A months-long look at the obstacles facing Louisville’s most vulnerable students. [WFPL]

Workers continue to make progress on New Albany’s East Main Street improvement project. [News & Tribune]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Louisville Media Is Sometimes A Giant Cat Fight

The next time there is a power outage, turn to your phone. LG&E and Kentucky Utilities have upgraded their website and app. It’s now more user-friendly and includes the weather radar. [WDRB]

With 30 more apartments under construction at the rapidly developing Masonic Homes of Kentucky, it again is seeking additional access to its campus from St. Matthews. [C-J/AKN]

You know the drill. Another day, another school bus accident. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering? Yes, Kentucky’s economy sucked during the month of April. [Page One]

Sure, she’s an entertainment reporter but shouldn’t Kirby Adams have to disclose the PR work she’s done for bourbon companies in the very recent past? [H-L via AKN]

The Belle of Louisville marks a major milestone this year – 100 years of cruising the Ohio River. To help celebrate, a big birthday bash is planned for October along the waterfront, despite budget cuts. [WLKY]

In his first intervention in the Ukraine crisis, the US ambassador to the Court of St James’s issues an unequivocal warning to bullying Moscow. Standing up to violence does not require that we be violent ourselves – but it does demand that we stand up. This is precisely what America, in close partnership with Britain and our other allies, is doing in response to the mounting crisis in Ukraine. [Daily Mail]

A veterans group, already restoring one centuries-old Louisville cemetery, is making plans to restore another one. [WAVE3]

Congressman John Yarmuth’s office held another art contest this year. Get all the details at his official government website. [Click the Clicky]

Just in case you were wondering how petty and bitter many local media buttcramps are these days. Some will stop at nothing to jealously rip a competitor apart. [WFPL]

How much animosity exists between Kosair Charities Committee Inc. and Norton Healthcare Inc.? [Business First]

Clark County employees have not received a raise in years and have seen the county’s contribution to their retirement funds disappear. The county commissioners declined to add more to their burden. [News & Tribune]

Nawbny Po-leece Maybe Have A Bit Of A Problem

Parents are calling into question the leadership of Male’s new principal, David Mike, whose first year is mired in an ongoing investigation into accusations of improper protocol on state standardized tests. Parents say he’s also unethical and unprofessional with students and staff and are concerned he’s forcing faculty to leave. Note: JCPS officials told us off-the-record after the last suicide that the principal was a hot mess. [WDRB]

Kosair Charities, which has given more than $6 million annually to Kosair Children’s Hospital, is accusing parent company Norton Healthcare of misusing some of that money to enhance its bottom line and “line the pockets” of its executives. [C-J/AKN]

Another fun weekend in Louisville filled with crazy shootings. Not in the West End, either, mouth-breathers. [WHAS11WHAS11]

Is Andy Beshear just like his homophobic daddy? Only time will tell. Beshear applies these assumptions in a new way: because same-sex couples do not contribute to the birth rate, it’s not economically beneficial for Kentucky to recognize their marriages. [Think Progress]

Wait, yet another shooting, this time ending in death. Again, not in the West End. [WLKY]

Long before Kim Baker became the leader of Kentucky’s biggest arts venue, she was an aspiring 16-year-old flutist studying at the Kentucky Governor’s School for the Arts. [H-L]

An attorney for a New Albany police officer claims a civil suit is in the works against NAPD after allegations of corrupt conduct. Laura Landenwich represents Patrol Officer Laura Schook, a 19-year veteran, who informed New Albany’s Police Merit Commission about corruption, discrimination and misuse of taxpayer money during a meeting May 8. [WAVE3]

Guess it’s safe to assume sports are bigger hits than embezzlement or corruption. This speculative story about the University of Louisville and the Yum Center last week was the most read story — ever — on The ‘Ville Voice. Ouch. [The ‘Ville Voice]

This is an interesting story about crashing Kentucky Derby gates. But it stinks of failure of the governor’s security detail and highlights just how easy it is for crazy people to get close to the him/her. [WFPL]

The University of Louisville has made two appointments for interim deans and another interim appointment to replace its departing vice president of student affairs. [Business First]

The attorney for a New Albany Police Department officer who has asked that alleged corruption at the agency be investigated says legal action will be taken against the department. [News & Tribune]