Yep, You Guessed It, Even More Shootings

Crosby Middle School’s site-based decision making council has an idea how to fix overcrowding at the popular east end school. [WDRB]

The constitutional amendment to create Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s much sought local option sales tax is in limbo in the final days of the 2015 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

A 13-year-old and a 17-year-old are expected to survive their injuries after a shooting in the Shawnee neighborhood Monday evening. [WHAS11]

It takes more than a good idea to create a successful business. But the best way for an entrepreneur to start is to make his or her idea as good as it can be. [H-L]

Another day, another murder in Possibility City. Police are investigating a homicide at the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex. [WLKY]

These are the wingnuts the Republicans are trying to lure in. [HuffPo]

It’s a stench surrounding Louisville that no one could seem to figure out. Hundreds of viewers told us it smells like wet carpet, a majority said it smelled like mildew. [WAVE3]

Here’s a story about Mitch McConnell and hemp. Though, there is no UPS wing at the airport — just a massive UPS hub, really its own airport. [Politico]

Charles Mintz’ latest collection, “Lustron Stories: Americans at Home,” explores the themes of place, purpose and the tenuous definition of the “American dream”—all in the context of Lustron prefabricated homes in modern Midwest neighborhoods. [WFPL]

Dr. Chuck Denham, once a leading voice for patient safety, will pay $1 million to settle civil allegations that he took kickbacks to promote a drug company’s product in national health quality guidelines, the Justice Department announced Monday. [ProPublica]

Walmart might not break ground on a West End store this summer after all, depending on the length and outcomes of a lawsuit filed March 2 in Jefferson County Circuit Court. [Business First]

The New Albany Housing Authority’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program has netted 29 homeowners with zero defaults since being created in 1999. [News & Tribune]

A Million Bucks To Study Louisville’s Character

A new grant will help protect JCPS student athletes while they’re playing sports. The grant was officially accepted by JCPS during a board meeting on Monday night. [WDRB]

National preservationists will spend $1 million over the next three years to study Louisville, devising plans to help preserve smaller buildings in “character-rich” areas and neighborhoods and promote healthy, urban living. [C-J/AKN]

On the surface this is a story about numbers. 22 assaults in Oldham County Schools, 452 drug offenses in Bullitt County, and 67 weapons at Jefferson County Public Schools. When you dig a little deeper, it’s a story about kids and it could be your kid. [WHAS11]

Really? We’re now just going to spread Kentucky Lottery games to the internet? What was that, again, about online gambling being the devil? [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! When will all of these murders end? Louisville Metro Police are investigating a fatal shooting in South Louisville and the victim has been identified. [WLKY]

On March 22, 1991, a visibly shaken and angered President George H.W. Bush said he was “sickened and outraged” by what he saw on television. That was the beating of black motorist Rodney King by a swarm of LAPD cops. A year later, following the acquittal of four LAPD cops by a Simi Valley jury with no blacks on it, Bush ordered then-Attorney General William Barr to begin the process of slapping federal civil rights charges on the four officers. [HuffPo]

Is Bobby Flay moving closer to buying a property in Louisville for a new restaurant? [WAVE3]

You can say a lot of things about the U.S. Congress. One thing you can’t really say, though, is that they’v(sic) been in Washington way too long. [WaPo]

When Polish artist Jakub Szczęsny arrived at the GE FirstBuild factory two weeks ago as the company’s first artist in residence, he expected his first day at work to play out like a scene from a mad scientist’s lab in American film. [WFPL]

A Seattle police plan to outfit officers with body cameras was back on for early December after the agency struck an unusual deal with an anonymous programmer whose massive public-records requests threatened to cripple the program, police said on Friday. [Reuters]

A Louisville-based farm has been named the agribusiness of the year in the Kentuckiana region. [Business First]

Removing legal jargon and condensing the city’s property codes into a concise form is the main purpose behind an ordinance that could be introduced by the New Albany City Council next month. [News & Tribune]

MSD & LWC Will Probably Ruin Everything Forever

Tucked away off a busy stretch of main street, a small driveway leads to an urban mural. [WDRB]

A full merger of the Louisville Water Co. and the Metropolitan Sewer District into a “One Water” agency as once envisioned by Mayor Greg Fischer would be a tremendous challenge and not recommended, Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell has concluded. But Greg Fischer is still a brilliant leader with great leadership ability? That merger was all his idea. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Many in Louisville gave their time over the weekend to honor those who have died and those who currently fight for our country. [WHAS11]

Cello, a female German Shepherd, is in a Louisville veterinary hospital, fighting to recover from a gunshot wound to her head and other serious injuries while authorities in Eastern Kentucky search for the person who attacked her. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Oh god! The snow! Everybody freak out and go to Kroger just in case. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama showed no signs of backing down from executive action on immigration reform on Wednesday, despite a Republican wave that ripped control of the U.S. Senate away from Democrats the night before. [HuffPo]

A vigil was held on Sunday, the 10th anniversary of the shooting death of John Shofner English, where his family pleaded for answers and for the men involved to turn themselves in. [WAVE3]

Federal investigators found rampant nepotism in recent years within the agency that oversees U.S. immigration courts, including three top officials who used their positions to help relatives land paid internships. [WaPo]

A Louisville Metro Council committee is asking the public to weigh in Monday on a proposal to raise the local minimum wage. [WFPL]

On Thursday, a federal appeals court upheld bans on gay marriage in Ohio, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Michigan. In a 2-1 vote, the 6th Circuit reversed lower courts’ rulings which had found the bans unconstitutional and sets up a likely Supreme Court showdown. Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey issued a scathing dissent. [Mother Jones]

After playing an exhibition game in Louisville earlier this year, the Miami Heat has expressed interest in coming back again. [Business First]

One of the oldest businesses in New Albany will close its doors after 134 years [News & Tribune]

Will A Food Hub Change Louisville’s West End?

Weeds growing between the concrete, broken chain linked fences, and crumbled bricks. It’s the site of a former tobacco plant. [WDRB]

The Jefferson County Board of Education is poised to vote Monday on this school year’s $1.3 billion working budget, which includes money for school-based mental health counselors and “transition centers” at middle and high schools. [C-J/AKN]

This will likely make people even more fearful of TARC. [WHAS11]

A federal bankruptcy judge has set a hearing in the long-running case of the now-defunct Decker College. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A Louisville man is literally changing the facades of Louisville, one building at a time, and he’s doing it with one hand. [WLKY]

Lifting a ban on blood donations from gay men would increase the amount of available blood by hundreds of thousands of pints (liters) each year and save more than a million lives a year, a California study showed on Friday. [HuffPo]

The White House’s top drug policy adviser took a trip to the Commonwealth Saturday. [WAVE3]

Mitch McConnell is hardly a lovable guy. The Republican leader in the U.S. Senate has a dour public persona and many of his constituents don’t view him as a “real Kentuckian,” according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll that underscores what his election campaign already knows – McConnell has an image problem. [Reuters]

Fall officially begins Tuesday, and Jefferson County’s Solid Waste Authority is hoping it’ll be a good season to change the way county residents bag their leaves. [WFPL]

Fifty years after Freedom Summer, two Mississippi sisters press the fight for voting rights. [ProPublica]

A law and medicine professor at the University of Louisville has received a $612,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to further international partnerships on genetic research. [Business First]

Really? This is in poor taste? Because we can think of a million other things that are in poor taste for Clark County. [News & Tribune]

Greg Fischer: He’s The Opposite Of Transparent

The city of Jeffersonville is changing its plans for a marina that’s been vacant since the first of the year, after construction bids were more expensive than expected. [WDRB]

Chris declined to comment if Kindred had asked the city for financial incentives to assist its project. Because he can’t be caught being transparent with taxpayers and his former employer, the paper, can never be caught pressing him to open up. [C-J/AKN]

An infant was shot and killed and another person was injured after a shooting in the 110 block of South 37th Street, close to Market Street. [WHAS11]

Lexington hopes to have its first “Housing First” program that would provide permanent housing to about 20 homeless people by the end of the year. [H-L]

Local organizations met Wednesday at the VA Medical Center on Zorn Avenue to find ways to help homeless veterans in Louisville. [WLKY]

Lexington is apparently one of the ten cities with the highest quality of life. [HuffPo]

It was called Frost Middle School, one of Jefferson County’s most low performing schools, but that all is gone. In its place is the new Robert Frost 6th Grade Academy. [WAVE3]

Cowboy boots and denim jeans. That’s all that was new here Tuesday as Mitch McConnell and Alison Lundergan Grimes squared off before more than 500 at the Red, White and Blue Picnic on the grounds of the Daviess County Courthouse in sweltering, mid-90 degree heat. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, Jeffersonville unveiled large-scale, wood models of the first piece commissioned by a community, civic and private initiative focused on developing public art in the Southern Indiana city. [WFPL]

“There’s only one thing Barack Obama needs to keep his grip on power,” Mitch McConnell said, his voice cracking amid the applause. “He needs the U.S. Senate!” [NY Times]

Ghislain d’Humieres, the director of the Speed Art Museum, has seen how the other half lives through many trips abroad. [Business First]

With a promise of 82 jobs to be added over the next three years, the New Albany City Council approved tax abatements for three companies . [News & Tribune]

Corrupt UofL Honchos Still Fighting Transparency

Storm and tornado-resistant homes being built at the site of former public housing in Louisville. Right now, multi-million dollar development is under construction in the Smoketown neighborhood. [WDRB]

A federal judge today ruled that same-sex couples have a right to marry in Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

The Louisville Slugger Museum is extending its hours during the summer and discounting the price during them. [WHAS11]

Hal Rogers should support funding for syringe access to help fight the heroin plague. But he won’t because he’s both a dishonest coward and someone who allows his backwater ignorance to prevent him from common sense decisions. [H-L]

TARC says it’s coming to the rescue for drivers concerned with the upcoming closure of the Clark Memorial Bridge. [WLKY]

The state attorney general’s office has asked University of Louisville to explain why it still won’t release a high-profile audit that examined the school’s financial controls. The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting has sought a copy of the report since April and last month filed an appeal with the attorney general following the university’s denial of a public records request. [Kristina Goetz]

Will these senseless shootings in the West End ever stop? [WAVE3]

Starting in August, the Obama administration will dramatically revamp and cut back the formula it uses to send transportation funds to the states unless Congress replenishes the Highway Trust Fund. [HuffPo]

A regional study says Kentucky public school students have more access to arts education programs than students in nine other southeastern states, but Kentucky Arts Council officials question the data used in the report. [WFPL]

Congressman John Yarmuth on immigration reform: “Every day we wait to fix our broken immigration system, more families are separated, businesses face continued uncertainty, and we miss out on new economic opportunities. The Senate has already acted, and I’m extremely disappointed that Speaker Boehner is bending to a minority of House Republicans and blocking a vote on commonsense, comprehensive immigration reform, which I believe would pass the House tomorrow.” [Press Release]

A week from today, the Clark Memorial Bridge will be closed for six weeks. As a way to ease congestion during the closure, the Ohio River Bridges Project and Transit Authority of River City are encouraging residents to ride the bus. [Business First]

It is now easier for Hoosiers to find out where methamphetamine activity is taking place in their communities. [News & Tribune]

Selective Parent Outrage Makes For Eye Rolls

Louisville entrepreneur Kent Oyler has been named the next president and CEO of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce. [WDRB]

When it comes to fitness, Louisville is huffing and puffing far behind its peers. The American College of Sports Medicine ranked the area a lowly 49th for fitness among the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas in its just-released 2014 American Fitness Index, which combines health behaviors, rates of chronic health problems, and community indicators such as recreational facilities and farmers’ markets. [C-J/AKN]

The Jefferson County Public Schools board approved a $1.3 billion budget for the 2014-2015 school year late Tuesday night and the district said the focus is to shift spending from administration to schools and classrooms. [WHAS11]

Darell Hammond of “KaBoom!” is partnering with the Humana Foundation to develop a national movement called Playful City USA, which honors communities that give kids easy access to play. [NPR]

Metro Animal Services continues to refuse to provide us with information so we may promote events like this. Because Margaret Brosko may just be the laziest (more on her in the coming days) Metro Government employee on the taxpayer dime. [WLKY]

The Danville City Commission on Tuesday created an exemption for a social services organization that said it would sue if the city passes an ordinance prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation in employment, housing and public accommodations. Because some backwater yokel rednecks can’t imagine living in a world where it’s illegal to discriminate against others based on your own ignorant fears. [H-L]

Dozens of parents are angry after they were told they would not be allowed at their children’s school during field day. But the principal of the school said it’s some of the parents that are to blame for the ban. Really, taking your kid to Kentucky Kingdom instead of sending them to school? Great parenting. [WAVE3]

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis released its quarterly banking performance for Louisville banks last week. [Business First]

A months-long look at the obstacles facing Louisville’s most vulnerable students. [WFPL]

Workers continue to make progress on New Albany’s East Main Street improvement project. [News & Tribune]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Louisville Media Is Sometimes A Giant Cat Fight

The next time there is a power outage, turn to your phone. LG&E and Kentucky Utilities have upgraded their website and app. It’s now more user-friendly and includes the weather radar. [WDRB]

With 30 more apartments under construction at the rapidly developing Masonic Homes of Kentucky, it again is seeking additional access to its campus from St. Matthews. [C-J/AKN]

You know the drill. Another day, another school bus accident. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering? Yes, Kentucky’s economy sucked during the month of April. [Page One]

Sure, she’s an entertainment reporter but shouldn’t Kirby Adams have to disclose the PR work she’s done for bourbon companies in the very recent past? [H-L via AKN]

The Belle of Louisville marks a major milestone this year – 100 years of cruising the Ohio River. To help celebrate, a big birthday bash is planned for October along the waterfront, despite budget cuts. [WLKY]

In his first intervention in the Ukraine crisis, the US ambassador to the Court of St James’s issues an unequivocal warning to bullying Moscow. Standing up to violence does not require that we be violent ourselves – but it does demand that we stand up. This is precisely what America, in close partnership with Britain and our other allies, is doing in response to the mounting crisis in Ukraine. [Daily Mail]

A veterans group, already restoring one centuries-old Louisville cemetery, is making plans to restore another one. [WAVE3]

Congressman John Yarmuth’s office held another art contest this year. Get all the details at his official government website. [Click the Clicky]

Just in case you were wondering how petty and bitter many local media buttcramps are these days. Some will stop at nothing to jealously rip a competitor apart. [WFPL]

How much animosity exists between Kosair Charities Committee Inc. and Norton Healthcare Inc.? [Business First]

Clark County employees have not received a raise in years and have seen the county’s contribution to their retirement funds disappear. The county commissioners declined to add more to their burden. [News & Tribune]