Maybe Next Week Won’t Be So Crazy

The University of Louisville’s endowment suffered a 5.8 percent investment loss in the year that ended June 30 – its biggest decline since the 2008 financial crisis. [WDRB]

Turns out that white flight is extremely valuable in Louisville’s East End. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Federal court records filed by the city said that police were justified in the shooting of Darnell Wicker. He is the man police said was holding a tree saw when officers responded to a domestic dispute in South Louisville in August. [WHAS11]

Horse Country hopes to boost Thoroughbred racing, Central Kentucky tourism by offering behind-the-scenes tours of farms, equine clinics and feed mills. The goal is to do for horse breeding what the Kentucky Bourbon Trail is doing for whiskey-making. [H-L]

How long has it been since there was a JCPS bus accident? Glad to see nothing changes. [WLKY]

Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) on Monday implored young leaders invited to the White House to continue his generation’s legacy of civil rights activism by reminding them of sacrifices that won the right to vote. [HuffPo]

Can trees and bushes block pollution from busy streets? That’s the question Louisville is trying to answer with a pilot project at St. Margaret Mary Catholic School on Shelbyville Road. [WAVE3]

Possibility City! A replacement model of the fire-prone Samsung Note 7 smartphone began smoking inside a U.S. plane on Wednesday, the family that owns it said, prompting fresh investigations by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Federal Aviation Administration. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin’s administration says HealthCare.gov will be up and running in Kentucky in time for Kynect customers to reapply for their health insurance later this year. [WFPL]

Voters in four states appear likely to approve ballot measures that would legalize marijuana for recreational purposes, according to recent surveys, while voters are split on the question in a fifth state. [The Hill]

Yum Brands Inc.’s plan to spin off its China unit will allow the company to focus more on its high-margin franchising business. [Business First]

Local shop owner Terry Lynch said she was more than happy to host a monthlong art show for local New Albany artists. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Continues To Get Crazy Under Donna Hargens’ “Leadership”

JCPS is getting really fancy these days. An Iroquois High student was arrested after allegedly bringing a loaded handgun to the school on Wednesday. [WDRB]

John Owen has a vision of a streetcar line returning to Market Street to connect West Louisville to downtown and East Louisville, capitalizing on the fact that much of the rail line infrastructure is still intact beneath the pavement. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! By 2020, graduation ceremonies may look different for greater Clark county schools. [WHAS11]

University of Kentucky officials will eventually unveil a controversial mural in Memorial Hall that was shrouded last year and will surround it with other works of art and more context, President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville has seen as many homicides so far this year as there were in all of 2015. [WLKY]

The James Graham Brown Foundation, which has provided more than $72 million in grants to the University of Louisville and related entities over the past 55 years, has threatened to cut off funding unless the U of L Foundation hires a nationally recognized forensic accounting firm to review its finances. [C-J/AKN]

What should be the criteria for removing a student from the Jefferson County Public Schools’ magnet program? [WAVE3]

The U.S. added 151,000 new jobs in August and the unemployment rate held steady at 4.9 percent, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. [NPR]

Joann Robinson stands under the trestle on Vine Street and Broadway, looking with admiration at the mural she painted back when the neighborhood was called German Paristown. [WFPL]

In 1988, a small-time drug dealer became the first man charged under a new, harsh drug law signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Almost 30 years later, President Barack Obama granted a sentence commutation to Richard Van Winrow, a literal posterboy for the history of America’s drug war. [BBC]

When Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. is finished with a $25 million expansion of its Bernheim Distillery in West Louisville next summer, it will have one of the biggest distilleries in the state, according to Denny Potter, master distiller and plant manager. [Business First]

The Republican challenger of Indiana schools Superintendent Glenda Ritz wants authorities to investigate a contract benefiting a company that hired a Ritz aide. [News & Tribune]

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More On The Weekend Shooting Spree

Louisville Metro Police are investigating after three juvenile females were shot. [WDRB]

A group of pastors and ministers said Thursday they are frustrated and angry over how quickly Louisville Metro Police officers shot and killed a man this week. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The 2016 Kentucky State Fair kicks off on August 18 amid multiple instances across our country of county and state fair accidents. As you can imagine, ride safety is on the minds of those on the Kentucky State Fair Board. [WHAS11]

Artists Kurt Gohde and Kremena Todorova’s latest work didn’t wind up where it’s located by accident. “We wanted something that would directly address the monuments,” Gohde said standing on Upper Street between the old Lexington Courthouse, which boasts statues of two Civil War figures, and the 21c Museum Hotel where his and Todorova’s work boasts the Frank X Walker quote, “Unlearn Fear + Hate,” which is the name of the piece. [H-L]

A shooting that left two people dead when gunfire erupted at a birthday party Tuesday in west Louisville remains under investigation. [WLKY]

Despite the world’s string high-profile terror attacks this year, the economy remains at the top of American voters’ minds, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds. A 45 percent plurality name the economy as one of the two issues most important to them, ranking it first on a list of 10 topics. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The David Armstrong Extreme Park is known as one of the best skate parks around the state. However, many have been taking it for granted and leaving it worse than they had found it. [WAVE3]

The first nationwide study to ask high school students about their sexuality found that gay, lesbian and bisexual teenagers were at far greater risk for depression, bullying and many types of violence than their straight peers. [NY Times]

Lead problems with the water in Flint, Mich., have prompted people across the country to ask whether they or their families have been exposed to the toxic metal in their drinking water, too. [WFPL]

Here’s Matt Bevin wasting your taxpayer dollars in favor of discrimination. Texas and a dozen other states asked a U.S. judge on Friday to block Obama administration guidance to public schools that transgender students must be allowed to use bathrooms of their choice, saying it usurps the authority of school districts nationwide. [Reuters]

GE Appliances is attempting to scare, intimidate and disorganize unionized workers ahead of contract negotiations scheduled to take place [this] week, according to Dana Crittendon, president of the IUE-CWA Local 83761. [Business First]

It took several years to get approved and more than an hour to debate Tuesday, but 18 Floyd County court employees will soon see a significant pay raise due to being reclassified. [News & Tribune]

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Another Fun Weekend Of Compassionate Death Wraps Up In Possibility City

GE Appliances says the wages of about 4,000 union-represented production workers at Louisville’s Appliance Park are too high to be competitive in the low-margin appliance business. [WDRB]

Tighter federal clean-air rules could save the lives of at least 48 people a year in the Louisville metro area over a year, according to a new study released Wednesday morning by a medical association. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO One person is dead after being hit by a train just north of the Kentucky Fair and Expo Center Saturday. [WHAS11]

The Affrilachian Poets, a diverse Lexington-based collective of writers directly or indirectly connected to Appalachia, has rejected its 2016 Governor’s Award in the Arts, citing Gov. Matt Bevin’s positions on education, the humanities and other issues. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are investigating a triple shooting near downtown. Police said at least three juveniles were shot at 16th and Jefferson streets Sunday. [WLKY]

This past Monday was supposed to be a turning point for Donald Trump. That was the day many Republicans hoped their presidential nominee, who was giving a speech at the Detroit Economic Club, would make his long-awaited pivot to the general election. More teleprompter, less Trump. [HuffPo]

On May 22, 2007, Curtis Lee Brown was shot seven times in the back at 35th Street and Broadway. Curtis’s brother, Chaz Brown, got the first call about his brother’s death. [WAVE3]

Coal mining. Bad management. Runoff from cities and farms. These are all things that are creating major problems for America’s rivers, according to a new report. [ThinkProgress & American Rivers]

Louisville’s bike share program is facing yet another delay. [WFPL]

The Republican leader of the U.S. Senate, Sen. Mitch McConnell, said this past week that maintaining his party’s control over the chamber is looking “dicey.” That’s primarily the product of an unfriendly 2016 map: 24 Republican senators are on this year’s ballot while Democrats must defend only 10 seats. Donald Trump isn’t making it any easier for McConnell either. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s a race to the courtroom for two big insurance mega-mergers — and it might be a close one. [Business First]

A move out of the district he represents prompted the resignation of a school board member in Clarksville Community Schools. [News & Tribune]

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JCPS Is Now Back To Its Old Tricks

LG&E is closing its coal ash ponds at its power plants in Louisville and Trimble County. [WDRB]

Jefferson County Public Schools has moved a Layne Elementary teacher to another school in the district after it said it found a “pattern of poor professional judgment and unsafe behavior,” particularly in relation to how the teacher used restraint on students. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS and JCTA are still unable to come to an agreement on salaries and contracts. [WHAS11]

The number of homeless students in Lexington schools has nearly doubled in the past three years, according to a new report that recommends more money and attention to schools with the highest percentage of homeless students. [H-L]

The Kentucky Arts Council says it has awarded a Teaching Art Together grant that will fund an artist residency in eight schools in the eastern part of the state. [WLKY]

A vastly underappreciated legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency is one that neither his conservative opponents nor his liberal allies like to mention: He’s presided over a historically unprecedented reduction in government employees. [HuffPo]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Jefferson County Public Schools employees are taught to restrain students who might be a danger to themselves or others. In the last two school years at JCPS, restraints were used 8,537 times. [WAVE3]

Ignore all the hype! If you’re wondering why Kentucky Democrats avoided Fancy Farm this year, look no further than the event’s emcee, who cracked racist jokes right off the bat. Republicans didn’t need the help of Democrats to burn their racist Trump barn down this year. [Page One]

Louisville’s Planning Commission has approved rules governing the siting of anerobic biodigesters in the city. The regulations approved Thursday were stricter than what planners had originally proposed, but won’t be finalized until they’re approved by Metro Council. [WFPL]

How dare anyone want safe drinking water or the preservation of lands. That makes native Appalachians environmental extremists, according to Rand Paul. He goes from literally telling black people they shouldn’t be allowed to sit at the lunch counter to making shit up about coal. [The Gleaner]

Churchill Downs Inc. CEO Bill Carstanjen said Thursday that the company’s Twinspires.com subsidiary will move from Mountain View, Calif., to Louisville before the end of the year and gave more details on its planned joint-venture acquisition of a Berlin, Md., casino and racetrack that was announced Tuesday. [Business First]

Pamela Fisher said she’s never shot a gun in her life. A gun range is planned for Clarksville. [News & Tribune]

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Let’s All Freak Out About Lead Pipes

How is JCPS addressing the learning gap between white and African-American students? That was just one of many topics at a meeting between Louisville’s NAACP and district leaders Monday night. [WDRB]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Every morning in every Louisville public school, custodians run the water fountains for up to a minute before children arrive for the day. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The city of New Albany is set to break ground on a new dog park on the site of the Cannon Acres Sports Complex, but a group of residents say that doing so would desecrate a historic Native American site. [WHAS11]

When the state’s oldest and largest art museum closes for three years for a $50 million makeover, expectations are high. But the transformation of the Speed Art Museum, which attracted 17,000 people to a 30-hour marathon reopening last weekend, blew me away. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Scott County hired a fifth prosecutor who will assist with the fight against drugs, which goes hand in hand with the efforts to curb the HIV outbreak in the area. [WLKY]

Burning coal doesn’t just pollute the environment and harm people’s health — it’s a huge drain on the world’s increasingly strained supply of freshwater. [HuffPo]

Concerns over children’s safety and control have prompted cancellations of protests planned for this year’s Kentucky Derby Festival Pegasus Parade on May 5 and a demonstration scheduled outside KDF’s downtown offices Monday evening, organizers said. [WAVE3]

An Indiana man was sentenced to life in prison on Friday for his part in causing a 2012 home explosion that killed two neighbors, injured dozens of people and damaged scores of homes in an Indianapolis neighborhood, a court official said. [Reuters]

The crumbling house next door to George Palmer’s 41st Street home hasn’t changed much over the years. Phone books are piled on the porch. Boards, cracked and curled after years of baking in the sun, cover the windows and front door. [WFPL]

More than 10,000 Kentuckians have registered to vote or updated their registration using GoVoteKY.com, the Commonwealth’s new online voter registration system. “GoVoteKY.com publicly launched last week and is already a huge success,” said Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes. “Over 10,000 people have used the site to register to vote or update their information. And anyone can use it – we’ve seen users from the age of 18 to 98!” [Press Release]

The number of craft spirits distillers across the United States have grown by a rate of 16 percent annually between 2007 and 2015, according to a preliminary report from the American Craft Spirits Association, the International Wine and Spirits Research and industry firm Park Street. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council approved an ordinance Thursday night which requires the registration of any property in the city that will be rented to tenants. [News & Tribune]

Still Loving The Christy Brown Shade

The federal government is throwing new resources at the growing heroin problem in Kentucky and throughout the nation. [WDRB]

Louisville planners recommended Thursday morning that short-term rentals be allowed in most zoning districts but that a special permit should be necessary if the unit is not a host’s primary residence. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The best part of this whole Speed Museum coverage? All the photos of Christy Brown throwing shade at Matt Bevin. May we all grow up to be as skilled as her. [WHAS11]

Lexington is apparently trying to imitate Louisville again. Second overnight shooting in a week. [H-L]

Valley Station may be one of the few areas of the city where Rand Paul would be welcomed with open arms. [WLKY]

Another Donald Trump supporter was caught on video evoking Nazis as he yelled at protesters following a rally in Cleveland on Saturday. “Go to Auschwitz,” the man said to the protesters after raising his arm in an apparent Nazi salute. “Go to fucking Auschwitz.” [HuffPo]

Really, all that shade Christy Brown threw was terrific. Somebody please give her an award. [WAVE3]

Apollo Global Management says it’s buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc., for $1.36 billion, in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market’s closing stock price last week. [NPR]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced federal funding for several Kentucky health care centers to help fight the state’s opioid epidemic. [WFPL]

How hot was it last month globally? It was so hot that the famed Iditarod sled race in Alaska brought in extra snow from hundreds of miles away by train. [ThinkProgress]

Two-thirds of state economic development spending benefits big businesses, according to a sample of three states analyzed by Good Jobs First. [Business First]

One of the last things left before Gateway Park opens in Clarksville is to wait for the grass to fill in. [News & Tribune]