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Indiana and Kentucky have selected a Virginia-based company to oversee the toll system for the Ohio River Bridges Project. The contract, estimated at $39.9 million, includes installing, operating and maintaining the toll equipment for seven years, said Kendra York, Indiana’s public finance director. [WDRB]

Churchill Downs Incorporated announced Churchill Downs, its namesake racetrack, and Yum! Brands, Inc., have signed a five-year agreement that extends Yum!’s role as the presenting sponsor of the $2 million-guaranteed Kentucky Derby, one of America’s most legendary sports and entertainment events. [Press Release]

Local police amass millions in military surplus. Jeffersontown Police Officer Tommy McCann popped the trunk of his cruiser to reveal thousands of dollars worth of military-grade equipment. [C-J/AKN]

WTF? Is there a war coming to Clarksville? [More C-J/AKN]

There was a ribbon cutting Monday afternoon for the new visitor center at the Stitzel-Weller distillery in Shively. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association says Stitzel-Weller will be the newest stop on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. [WHAS11]

Police in Pulaski County recently worked two incidents in a week’s time involving alleged drunk drivers on riding lawn mowers, including one arrested after he ​drove to the drive-through window at a fast-food restaurant, according to the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office. [H-L]

The affidavit said after Oberhansley killed Blanton, he removed parts of her skull and brain, heart and part of a lung. The document said Oberhansley told detectives he cooked and ate the organs. [WLKY]

An astounding 72% percent of Americans say they are unhappy with Republicans in Congress. [HuffPo]

It could be the most important thing you do this week. A Louisville high school sophomore desperately needs a bone marrow match to win the fight he’s battled for three years. [WAVE3]

Was it really only a year ago that we were gearing up for the big unveil of where the uninsured could seamlessly go online and shop for health care as they would their vacation travel? [WaPo]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District has reached an agreement with the union that represents several of its employees. [WFPL]

Public schools throughout the nation continue to contend with budget shortfalls and insufficient classroom resources, while U.S. test scores remain far behind those of many other developed nations. Here are measures that can be taken to fix America’s troubled education system. [The Onion]

You guessed it — more of the same for the arena shenanigans. [Business First]

Complaints about the termination of a recycling program in Clark County’s unincorporated areas may prompt the county commissioners to bring it back — if the price is right. [News & Tribune]


Southern Indiana drivers who use I-65 can expect to add more time to their commute starting next week. Ohio River Bridges Project officials are calling this next phase of construction the “Big Squeeze.” [WDRB]

The revenue coming into a restructured taxing district to help finance the bonds for the KFC Yum! Center continues to increase. [C-J/AKN]

Deplorable and unsafe. That’s how hundreds of University of Louisville students are describing their new off campus housing. [WHAS11]

Leaders at Northern Kentucky University say they plan to travel around the state in an effort to spread the word about what makes the school special. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of students return to the classrooms at the University of Louisville on Monday morning. [WLKY]

The small city of Jennings, Mo., had a police department so troubled, and with so much tension between white officers and black residents, that the city council finally decided to disband it. Everyone in the Jennings police department was fired. New officers were brought in to create a credible department from scratch. That was three years ago. One of the officers who worked in that department, and lost his job along with everyone else, was a young man named Darren Wilson. [WaPo]

Ford’s Louisville Assembly Plant will celebrate the launch of the 2015 Lincoln MKC and announce a plant update Monday. [WAVE3]

Of course this Kentucky story made international news. Two Kentucky firefighters are being treated for severe burns after suffering electric shocks while helping students participate in the “ice bucket challenge”, local media report. [BBC]

The Louisville Metro Council can legally establish a local minimum wage within the city limits, according to a legal opinion issued Monday by Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office. [WFPL & Press Release]

Alison Lundergan Grimes, the Democrat hoping to unseat Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.), thinks that “limited air strikes for humanitarian reasons and in support of our allies against terrorists are appropriate,” according to a campaign aide. [The Hill]

A regional infrastructure report issued by the Bluegrass Economic Advancement Movement this week shows the 22-county region between Lexington and Louisville needs to shore up its infrastructure deficiencies to compete nationally and on a global level for economic development. [Business First]

The Waste Water Department may have enough money to pay off an EPA-mandated project, but it’s going to be pretty tight, according to preliminary reports from Sycamore Advisors. [News & Tribune]

Hot Mess Called Cordish Is Just Making Excuses

Yes, kids, your tax dollars paid someone to say your tax dollars are hurting your tax dollars. KFC! Yum Center has actually “added competition and hurt” another taxpayer-subsidized entertainment venue in downtown Louisville: 4th Street Live. That’s according to a long-time Louisville real estate appraiser hired by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore-based developers that own and operate 4th Street Live. [WDRB]

Four crosswalks along Fourth Street are going to become works of art. The crosswalks at the intersections of Fourth at Broadway, York, Breckinridge and Kentucky streets will be painted as part of the SoBro ArtWalks Contest, which is seeking crosswalk designs. [C-J/AKN]

A plea deal has been reached for the former Louisville Metro Housing director and her mother. [WHAS11]

In 1964, former Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and a group of investors paid $2 million to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Col. Harland Sanders for his legendary chicken business and his secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. [H-L]

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville announced Tuesday a $1 million gift from Sam Swope, founder of Sam Swope Auto Group. [WLKY]

The Gannett Company said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its print operations, including USA Today, becoming the latest media company to break itself up. [NY Times]

As heroin deaths continue to rise throughout the Commonwealth, interest in an overdose antidote known as Naloxone or Narcan is being considered among law enforcement officials. [WAVE3]

Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Greg Fischer has no idea what Louisvillians want or need. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s statewide rail plan is ready for review at the Transportation Cabinet. [Click the Clicky]

Owners of vacant and blighted properties in Lexington may soon face higher taxes. [Business First]

The Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency wants to hear from you. [News & Tribune]

Crazed Teatoots Vandalize Smoking Ban Signs

Are you a generous person or someone who loves animals? Help Jackson the Dachshund out ASAP, as he needs surgery! Jessica has been a tireless advocate for years and has definitely given more than she’s received. Let’s all pitch in. [Go Fund Me!]

A longtime educator with Jefferson County Public Schools has been named an assistant superintendent for the district who will oversee academics at 23 schools. [WDRB]

Despite two underperforming events in May and the postponement of the Paul McCartney and Miley Cyrus concerts, KFC Yum! Center officials said they expect to end the year with about $1.4 million in operating profit. [C-J/AKN]

A facility used to host meetings in downtown Louisville was reintroduced to the public Monday. [WHAS11]

The Derby City’s food scene has grown to include much more than juleps and hot Browns. [H-L]

The KFC Yum Center already attracts big crowds for University of Louisville basketball games and big-name concerts. Now the arena is offering entertainment with the summer plaza series. [WLKY]

If you missed it yesterday, the Education Professional Standards Board is making an epic move toward more secrecy and educational corruption. [Page One]

You can’t smoke in public buildings and workplaces in Louisville Metro. Now, Metro government is asking that you not smoke in park playgrounds and swimming pools where children are gathered. [WAVE3]

As a young Senate staffer in the early ’70s, I tended to form my opinions on the members based not on how they voted, but by how they treated us. [John Yarmuth]

Louisville is set to award franchise agreements to three private companies looking to bring ultra high-speed Internet service to the city. [WFPL]

Members of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee on Monday ripped the Veterans Affairs Department for covering up mistakes as it rushed to reduce its mammoth disability claims backlog. [The Hill]

When Louisville Metro Government wanted to monitor the air quality in locations across Louisville, it needed a product that hadn’t yet been produced by a commercial manufacturer. [Business First]

An officer who has claimed mistreatment failed to appear before the New Albany Police Merit Commission Thursday after requesting to be heard by the body. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Is Afraid To Get Shot On The Snyder

A woman says she saw two men running from the area of the Snyder shooting. [WDRB]

Contributions to the 61st annual WHAS Crusade for Children totaled $5,637,680. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police officers are turning to the public to get answers about who may have fired shots into a car on the Gene Snyder Freeway over the weekend. [WHAS11]

The 2018 World Equestrian Games will be held in Canada after all, apparently thanks to a dispute over sponsorship. [H-L]

Another day, another sad shooting in Possibility City. [WLKY]

Climate change is driving up the number of children who are living with asthma, according to a new White House report out Friday. [The Hill]

Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell released a statement and call to action after medical examiners said his son, Matt O’Connell, died of an overdose of cocaine, heroin and alcohol in May. [WAVE3]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Democratic Jefferson County Judge-Executive Bryan Matthews is taking on a new public service role—Louisville Metro Council aide. Matthews’ dual roles — a county official also working as a Metro officer — raises a host of questions. Of course he works for Dan Johnson. Of course he does. [WFPL]

Detroit’s reliance on casino cash to help fund a recovery from the city’s historic bankruptcy is a high-risk bet on what is an increasingly shaky source of income. [Reuters]

The economic impact analysis of the KFC Yum! Center in downtown Louisville is pretty standard, according to a University of Kentucky economist. But like similar studies, it fails to take some factors into consideration. [Business First]

Neace Lukens account executive Sandy Halstead is Clark County’s new agent of record for health insurance, but the county may now face litigation from its former agent. [News & Tribune]

Some Things You Can Freak Out About Today

Watching Marianne Butler get outsmarted by Republicans (because she thinks she’s the smartest person in the room, much like Jim King) is hilarious. The Metro Council’s minority Republican members are asking Democratic budget chair Marianne Butler to resign her post, claiming she failed to forward a list of budget priorities to Mayor Greg Fischer. [WDRB]

It’s kind of sad that people like this truly believed Greg Fischer was going to be better/different/a breath of fresh air. Labor relations between the city of Louisville and its unions have deteriorated over many years. It was to be hoped that, with Greg Fischer as mayor, there would have been a turn for the better. Sadly, workers in different departments are treated differently. [C-J/AKN]

Having a child with sight issues can leave parents wondering what questions to ask and where to get help. [WHAS11]

Hey, Craig Greenberg, it’s time for you and your mega-wealthy partners to stop begging for taxpayer dollars for your own personal gain. We’ve given you a free pass for a lot of years but that’s worn out. Stop with this Jonathan Miller-style shyster behavior. You’re better than that. And if your project can’t function without taxpayer dollars, it needs to die the same death your failed Museum Plaza project died and you know it. [H-L]

A new book detailing the case of a young Louisville teen who was brutally murdered three years ago is creating controversy before its release. Pro-tip to the Zwickers: no one buys books and this person isn’t going to get rich. You’re hurting but overreacting. [WLKY]

No pets, skateboards, inline skates or most motorized vehicles, aside from wheelchairs or those used by security. Those are the prohibited items for the Jeffersonville ramp to the Big Four Bridge under an ordinance the Jeffersonville City Council approved Monday night. They take effect immediately. [More C-J/AKN]

Jackie Green has been hitting Greg Fischer on a regular basis. Here’s the latest. [Jackie Green]

Metro Council’s president and several Republicans called the creation of new bike lanes near downtown into question on Tuesday. [WAVE3]

Many of you have for some reason been asking for the Seven Counties release about the bankruptcy judge’s decision. So here you go. [External PDF Link]

Starting next year, Louisville will host a professional soccer club in the Major League Soccer-affiliated United Soccer League PRO division. [WFPL]

What? You mean the people responsible for the arena paid for a study that says positive things? Surely not! [Business First]

The ballyhooed opening of the Big Four pedestrian bridge in Jeffersonville has garnered a great amount of attention, but there are other significant projects affecting the Ohio River Greenway on the horizon. [News & Tribune]

Eating crow is never fun but that’s what Jake is doing. Help him get things squared away? If you get something out of this content, consider doing so in order to ensure that it continues. [Click Here For Details]

Nawbny Po-leece Maybe Have A Bit Of A Problem

Parents are calling into question the leadership of Male’s new principal, David Mike, whose first year is mired in an ongoing investigation into accusations of improper protocol on state standardized tests. Parents say he’s also unethical and unprofessional with students and staff and are concerned he’s forcing faculty to leave. Note: JCPS officials told us off-the-record after the last suicide that the principal was a hot mess. [WDRB]

Kosair Charities, which has given more than $6 million annually to Kosair Children’s Hospital, is accusing parent company Norton Healthcare of misusing some of that money to enhance its bottom line and “line the pockets” of its executives. [C-J/AKN]

Another fun weekend in Louisville filled with crazy shootings. Not in the West End, either, mouth-breathers. [WHAS11WHAS11]

Is Andy Beshear just like his homophobic daddy? Only time will tell. Beshear applies these assumptions in a new way: because same-sex couples do not contribute to the birth rate, it’s not economically beneficial for Kentucky to recognize their marriages. [Think Progress]

Wait, yet another shooting, this time ending in death. Again, not in the West End. [WLKY]

Long before Kim Baker became the leader of Kentucky’s biggest arts venue, she was an aspiring 16-year-old flutist studying at the Kentucky Governor’s School for the Arts. [H-L]

An attorney for a New Albany police officer claims a civil suit is in the works against NAPD after allegations of corrupt conduct. Laura Landenwich represents Patrol Officer Laura Schook, a 19-year veteran, who informed New Albany’s Police Merit Commission about corruption, discrimination and misuse of taxpayer money during a meeting May 8. [WAVE3]

Guess it’s safe to assume sports are bigger hits than embezzlement or corruption. This speculative story about the University of Louisville and the Yum Center last week was the most read story — ever — on The ‘Ville Voice. Ouch. [The ‘Ville Voice]

This is an interesting story about crashing Kentucky Derby gates. But it stinks of failure of the governor’s security detail and highlights just how easy it is for crazy people to get close to the him/her. [WFPL]

The University of Louisville has made two appointments for interim deans and another interim appointment to replace its departing vice president of student affairs. [Business First]

The attorney for a New Albany Police Department officer who has asked that alleged corruption at the agency be investigated says legal action will be taken against the department. [News & Tribune]