At Least Fischer Isn’t A Xenophobe/Bigot

Good grief, you can’t even hide in the ceiling these days without getting arrested. [WDRB]

This story originally ran in late January. Twenty-one Syrian refugees will arrive in Louisville over the next two weeks, a figure expected to increase in Kentucky and beyond as the U.S. begins to take in an expanded number of refugees fleeing Syria’s bloody civil war. [C-J/AKN]

A week after the deadly terrorist attacks that rocked Paris, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is urging the community to stand in solidarity with refugees and those affected by the horrific acts. [WHAS11]

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Kentucky county clerk’s office should reissue altered marriage licenses even though the governor has promised to recognize them as valid. [H-L]

Your tax dollars are paying for Jerry Abramson’s pals to conduct media boat tours. [WLKY]

The nation’s capital is receiving a wonderful gift this holiday season. Atlanta’s Homeward Choir, a group of men from the city’s Central Night Shelter, have been invited to perform at the White House Open House Holiday Celebration on Dec. 21. [HuffPo]

As temperatures drop back into the 20s, homeless shelters across Louisville are starting Operation White Flag. [WAVE3]

First-hand accounts like this won’t deter pandering bigots like Rand Paul and Matt Bevin. Until last year, I was one of 4.3 million people at the mercy of the legal immigration system, waiting for the chance to stay in the U.S. for good. [BuzzFeed]

A group of about 80 people gathered on Friday afternoon to call on the Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney to cease his efforts to have Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens removed from all criminal cases pending before him. [WFPL]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

The Louisville Arena Authority has a new member and a new chairman after the resignation earlier this month of chairman Larry Hayes. [Business First]

Sheriff Frank Loop said he had no idea the Floyd County Animal Control Board voted Thursday to suspend services to residents living outside the city limits for the rest of 2015. [News & Tribune]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Another Reason To Think Swift Is Gross

If Greg Fischer’s involved in discussing the future of the South End, you know it’s doomed. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority ended its total ban on firearms and agreed Monday to give promoters and booking agents of events at the KFC Yum! Center the right to decide whether ticketed visitors can carry firearms into the downtown arena. [C-J/AKN]

Just in case you need another reason to distrust Greg Fischer and his people to protect anything. Quite a fascinating trip down memory lane. [WHAS11]

Veterans and active duty military personnel are invited to visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and Churchill Downs free of charge on Wednesday in honor of Veterans Day. [H-L]

A case of tuberculosis at the JBS Swift processing plant is being investigated by the health department. [WLKY]

Oh, nowwwwww we know why Anne Northup is five Old Fashioneds deep in Marco Rubio’s world. Gay panic beams are on high, henny. [HuffPo]

The UAW says Ford’s investment in U.S. plants of $9 billion will create or keep about 8,500 jobs over the next four years. [WAVE3]

In December 1988, Jörg Winger was a West German Army radio operator eavesdropping on Soviet military channels when he overheard a startling message: The Russians wished him Merry Christmas by name. “That was the moment where we realized that we had moles on the base,” he recalled. [NY Times]

PEE ALERT! Former U.S. Rep. Anne Northup has endorsed Marco Rubio for president and will lead his efforts in Kentucky’s first ever presidential caucus in March. [WFPL]

The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear another challenge to the Affordable Care Act, this time to decide whether religiously affiliated organizations such as universities, hospitals and charities can be free from playing any role in providing their employees with contraceptive coverage. [WaPo]

Louisville-based Yum Brands Inc. again is getting negative press for its food-supplier practices. This Washington Post story from today identifies Yum — which owns the KFC, Taco Bell and Pizza Hut brands — as the last major fast food company not to embrace higher-quality food sourcing that takes animal welfare into account. [Business First]

An ordinance to give $75,000 to a local organization aimed at eliminated homelessness advanced at Thursday night’s New Albany City Council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Yeah, That Was Totally Just A Glitch

The Louisville Water Company failed to read one of the meters at the KFC Yum! Center for four years, letting about $100,000 in water and sewer charges go uncollected, arena officials said. [WDRB]

An event is planned at the University of Louisville on July 20 to mark the 1969 lunar moon landing by the Apollo 11 astronauts. [C-J/AKN]

Executives at Floyd Memorial Hospital say they plan to hire a consultant to consider options for securing the survival of the 236-bed facility in New Albany. [WHAS11]

Considering Republicans’ condemnation of Beshear for implementing the Affordable Care Act by executive order, the suggestion that he wield his pen again on this issue was more laughably hypocritical than the Rowan County clerk’s explanation of her intolerant beliefs. [H-L]

It floods enough that people should know better to drive into water, right? Rescue crews were called to Louisville’s Lake Forest community twice Tuesday morning to help two drivers whose cars were submerged in floodwaters. [WLKY]

It was September of their sophomore year at Tufts University in 2012 when John Kelly went to a party and saw someone who had sexually assaulted them only two weeks earlier. [HuffPo]

If you’ve headed into downtown Louisville lately, you have probably noticed a big difference on the Ohio River Bridges Project as some major progress is being made. [WAVE3]

Two Richmond residents had their bags packed and were ready to get married June 26 regardless of Kentucky law. However, the Supreme Court’s marriage equality decision meant they could celebrate at home with their family instead of traveling to Chicago that night, they said. [Richmond Register]

When Roger Collins first started coming around the Baxter Community Center, the kids really didn’t talk to him. [WFPL]

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning heard testimony today in the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky’s lawsuit against Rowan County and Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to issue marriage licenses to any eligible couple, in an attempt to keep same-gender couples from obtaining them. [ACLU-KY]

The University of Louisville Board of Trustees’ compensation committee voted unanimously Monday to give university president James Ramsey a pay raise of 6 percent and a 25 percent annual bonus — though a consultant’s study found that Ramsey is already paid much more than his peers. [Business First]

Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services interim CEO Dr. Dan Eichenberger said he is seeking out the help of a consultant to map out the future of the hospital. [News & Tribune]

Friday Was An Arena News Dump Day

A Bullitt County official has been taken off the job over accusations that he made racist and sexist remarks, as well as claims that he mistreated employees, and the animals he was supposed to care for. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority that operates the KFC Yum! Center doesn’t have to fork over $7.5 million to the Kentucky State Fair Board to compensate it for business the board lost at Freedom Hall after the new downtown arena opened in 2010. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office released a letter Friday expressing what it termed an informal opinion that the arena authority isn’t obligated to pay that sum. [C-J/AKN]

Police are conducting a death investigation in the Parkland neighborhood after a body was found in a vehicle early Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

State officials approved at or near maximum tuition increases at four state universities Friday amid a heated GOP primary for governor where the candidates have lamented the escalating cost of college. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mother Nature was smiling as perfect weather allowed hundreds of thousands lined both sides of the Ohio River for Thunder Over Louisville 2015. [WLKY]

An HIV outbreak in southeastern Indiana related to abuse of intravenous prescription drugs has jumped by 24 cases in the past week, an increase attributed to offering more testing resources, state health officials said on Friday. [HuffPo]

All across the country the use of body cameras continues to be a hot topic. In Louisville it will be more than just a conversation, it will be a pilot project beginning in June. [WAVE3]

California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old Siberian Husky mix was killed by a local animal shelter over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford. [CNN Money]

In its first 10 days, more than 40 people used a new needle exchange program in the Southern Indiana county struggling with an HIV crisis linked to intravenous drug use. [WFPL]

On Friday, Steve Beshear appointed Debbie King to replace her husband on the Arena Authority. Which… well… you thought Jim was secretive? Wait til you meet Debbie. Though, she’s super-nice and not even we dislike her. [Press Release]

Hardin County-based Boundary Oak Distillery plans to expand in Radcliff. [Business First]

It was the only invocation spoken aloud, as New Albany resident Melanie Adams offered a prayer during the public comments portion of Thursday’s city council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Has A Sports Thing Hangover

Big blue nation has undoubtedly descended on downtown Louisville. While some may call them crazy, the rest of the sports world isn’t — and that world is taking notice of the city. [WDRB]

The Economy Inn, 3304 Bardstown Road near Goldsmith Lane, has long harbored a reputation as a haven for drug addicts and prostitutes. Would this be on anyone’s radar if wealthy Highlands residents didn’t have to drive by on their way to Target? [C-J/AKN]

After the games, droves of fans have to go somewhere and many choose to stay in town and keep on celebrating. [WHAS11]

Earlier this winter, the folks at Bernheim Arboretum noticed a majestic golden eagle spending time in the forested hills of Bernheim Forest in Bullitt County. [H-L]

Three of the so-called misidentified four are facing a lawsuit. Less than two weeks ago the four men held a news conference to talk about their $1.5 million settlement with metro Louisville. [WLKY]

Indiana is expected to pass a religious freedom bill that could legalize discrimination against LGBT citizens. The legislation has language that is similar to a bill that was vetoed by Arizona’s former Republican governor last year after a national outcry. [HuffPo]

Investigators say a fire at a vacant building that displaced 13 people from a neighboring home on Saturday is “suspicious.” [WAVE3]

The Prince of Wales has described how the world faces the challenges of an economic system with enormous shortcomings, and an environmental crisis that threatens us all. His words of warning came yesterday at the end of his four-day tour of America when he gave a speech on health and the environment following a symposium in Louisville, Kentucky. [Daily Mail]

For Louisville’s homeless residents, case managers are counselors, teachers and movers. They can help people who have lived on the streets—sometimes for decades—adjust to life in a home. [WFPL]

Brooke Barzun explains how she is trying to re-invent the rules of diplomacy by asking the great and the good to relax. [Belfast Telegraph]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will be ceasing its scares in Southern Indiana. Todd Moore, who owns the roughly 50,000-square-foot property, plans to relocate the haunted house south into Louisville and sell the Jeffersonville location to New Hope Services Inc. for redevelopment into an income-based housing community for people ages 55 and older. [Business First]

Officials remain tight-lipped on the reasons for Jeffersonville Police Department Lt. Chris Grimm’s removal as chief, beyond Mayor Mike Moore’s explanation that it’s “time for a new direction” in the force. [News & Tribune]

Homeless Kids? What Homeless Kids? Surely Not

Here’s your annual Greg Fischer Pee Alert: Citing his progress in making Louisville a globally-regarded city for caring and compassion, a coalition of international organizations has honored Mayor Greg Fischer with a City Leadership award for compassion. [Lane Report PR Regurgitation]

Nakiya Crawford hasn’t seen her father in more than a year. Crawford Confessed, “I don’t talk about it much.” [WDRB]

On a bus trip with 18 western Louisville residents to see how sustainable power plants turn waste into energy, Keith S. Hackett, assistant director of the Metro Department of Public Works, wondered aloud how much tax money could be saved. [C-J/AKN]

For one east Louisville family, early mornings are about getting in the yard and enjoying quiet time. Recently, the family experienced a big scare during their morning routine. [WHAS11]

A Superintendent Screening Committee will be formed to help the Fayette County school board select a new leader for the district. Under state law, the committee must include one parent, who will be elected by the presidents of the PTA or parent organization at all of the district schools. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Once again all eyes are on Ferguson as the nation waits for the grand jury’s decision on whether to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson for firing the shots that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. [WLKY]

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. [HuffPo]

The possibility of a labor strike looms after tempers rose during a Metropolitan Sewer District Board meeting. [WAVE3]

In Mitch McConnell’s world, it doesn’t matter who works in his Hill office, who left for K Street or who runs his campaign, almost everyone calls the Kentucky Republican “Boss.” [Politico]

Kentucky’s community college system offers little accountability in its presidential search. [WFPL]

After saying “no” last April, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said Friday that it now will hear oral arguments on two lawsuits that threaten the financial stability of most of the state’s public libraries, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

The KFC Yum! Center will be at the heart of March Madness in 2016. [Business First]

A national watchdog organization for issues pertaining to church and state separation sent a letter to New Albany regarding Saturday’s 46th Annual Mayor’s Community Prayer Breakfast. [News & Tribune]