Friday Was An Arena News Dump Day

A Bullitt County official has been taken off the job over accusations that he made racist and sexist remarks, as well as claims that he mistreated employees, and the animals he was supposed to care for. [WDRB]

The Louisville Arena Authority that operates the KFC Yum! Center doesn’t have to fork over $7.5 million to the Kentucky State Fair Board to compensate it for business the board lost at Freedom Hall after the new downtown arena opened in 2010. Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office released a letter Friday expressing what it termed an informal opinion that the arena authority isn’t obligated to pay that sum. [C-J/AKN]

Police are conducting a death investigation in the Parkland neighborhood after a body was found in a vehicle early Saturday morning. [WHAS11]

State officials approved at or near maximum tuition increases at four state universities Friday amid a heated GOP primary for governor where the candidates have lamented the escalating cost of college. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Mother Nature was smiling as perfect weather allowed hundreds of thousands lined both sides of the Ohio River for Thunder Over Louisville 2015. [WLKY]

An HIV outbreak in southeastern Indiana related to abuse of intravenous prescription drugs has jumped by 24 cases in the past week, an increase attributed to offering more testing resources, state health officials said on Friday. [HuffPo]

All across the country the use of body cameras continues to be a hot topic. In Louisville it will be more than just a conversation, it will be a pilot project beginning in June. [WAVE3]

California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old Siberian Husky mix was killed by a local animal shelter over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford. [CNN Money]

In its first 10 days, more than 40 people used a new needle exchange program in the Southern Indiana county struggling with an HIV crisis linked to intravenous drug use. [WFPL]

On Friday, Steve Beshear appointed Debbie King to replace her husband on the Arena Authority. Which… well… you thought Jim was secretive? Wait til you meet Debbie. Though, she’s super-nice and not even we dislike her. [Press Release]

Hardin County-based Boundary Oak Distillery plans to expand in Radcliff. [Business First]

It was the only invocation spoken aloud, as New Albany resident Melanie Adams offered a prayer during the public comments portion of Thursday’s city council meeting. [News & Tribune]

Everyone Has A Sports Thing Hangover

Big blue nation has undoubtedly descended on downtown Louisville. While some may call them crazy, the rest of the sports world isn’t — and that world is taking notice of the city. [WDRB]

The Economy Inn, 3304 Bardstown Road near Goldsmith Lane, has long harbored a reputation as a haven for drug addicts and prostitutes. Would this be on anyone’s radar if wealthy Highlands residents didn’t have to drive by on their way to Target? [C-J/AKN]

After the games, droves of fans have to go somewhere and many choose to stay in town and keep on celebrating. [WHAS11]

Earlier this winter, the folks at Bernheim Arboretum noticed a majestic golden eagle spending time in the forested hills of Bernheim Forest in Bullitt County. [H-L]

Three of the so-called misidentified four are facing a lawsuit. Less than two weeks ago the four men held a news conference to talk about their $1.5 million settlement with metro Louisville. [WLKY]

Indiana is expected to pass a religious freedom bill that could legalize discrimination against LGBT citizens. The legislation has language that is similar to a bill that was vetoed by Arizona’s former Republican governor last year after a national outcry. [HuffPo]

Investigators say a fire at a vacant building that displaced 13 people from a neighboring home on Saturday is “suspicious.” [WAVE3]

The Prince of Wales has described how the world faces the challenges of an economic system with enormous shortcomings, and an environmental crisis that threatens us all. His words of warning came yesterday at the end of his four-day tour of America when he gave a speech on health and the environment following a symposium in Louisville, Kentucky. [Daily Mail]

For Louisville’s homeless residents, case managers are counselors, teachers and movers. They can help people who have lived on the streets—sometimes for decades—adjust to life in a home. [WFPL]

Brooke Barzun explains how she is trying to re-invent the rules of diplomacy by asking the great and the good to relax. [Belfast Telegraph]

Industrial Terrorplex, a haunted house attraction at 835 Spring St. in Jeffersonville, will be ceasing its scares in Southern Indiana. Todd Moore, who owns the roughly 50,000-square-foot property, plans to relocate the haunted house south into Louisville and sell the Jeffersonville location to New Hope Services Inc. for redevelopment into an income-based housing community for people ages 55 and older. [Business First]

Officials remain tight-lipped on the reasons for Jeffersonville Police Department Lt. Chris Grimm’s removal as chief, beyond Mayor Mike Moore’s explanation that it’s “time for a new direction” in the force. [News & Tribune]

Homeless Kids? What Homeless Kids? Surely Not

Here’s your annual Greg Fischer Pee Alert: Citing his progress in making Louisville a globally-regarded city for caring and compassion, a coalition of international organizations has honored Mayor Greg Fischer with a City Leadership award for compassion. [Lane Report PR Regurgitation]

Nakiya Crawford hasn’t seen her father in more than a year. Crawford Confessed, “I don’t talk about it much.” [WDRB]

On a bus trip with 18 western Louisville residents to see how sustainable power plants turn waste into energy, Keith S. Hackett, assistant director of the Metro Department of Public Works, wondered aloud how much tax money could be saved. [C-J/AKN]

For one east Louisville family, early mornings are about getting in the yard and enjoying quiet time. Recently, the family experienced a big scare during their morning routine. [WHAS11]

A Superintendent Screening Committee will be formed to help the Fayette County school board select a new leader for the district. Under state law, the committee must include one parent, who will be elected by the presidents of the PTA or parent organization at all of the district schools. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Once again all eyes are on Ferguson as the nation waits for the grand jury’s decision on whether to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson for firing the shots that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. [WLKY]

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. [HuffPo]

The possibility of a labor strike looms after tempers rose during a Metropolitan Sewer District Board meeting. [WAVE3]

In Mitch McConnell’s world, it doesn’t matter who works in his Hill office, who left for K Street or who runs his campaign, almost everyone calls the Kentucky Republican “Boss.” [Politico]

Kentucky’s community college system offers little accountability in its presidential search. [WFPL]

After saying “no” last April, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said Friday that it now will hear oral arguments on two lawsuits that threaten the financial stability of most of the state’s public libraries, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

The KFC Yum! Center will be at the heart of March Madness in 2016. [Business First]

A national watchdog organization for issues pertaining to church and state separation sent a letter to New Albany regarding Saturday’s 46th Annual Mayor’s Community Prayer Breakfast. [News & Tribune]

This Kid Needs Your Help. Consider Stepping Up.

Indiana and Kentucky have selected a Virginia-based company to oversee the toll system for the Ohio River Bridges Project. The contract, estimated at $39.9 million, includes installing, operating and maintaining the toll equipment for seven years, said Kendra York, Indiana’s public finance director. [WDRB]

Churchill Downs Incorporated announced Churchill Downs, its namesake racetrack, and Yum! Brands, Inc., have signed a five-year agreement that extends Yum!’s role as the presenting sponsor of the $2 million-guaranteed Kentucky Derby, one of America’s most legendary sports and entertainment events. [Press Release]

Local police amass millions in military surplus. Jeffersontown Police Officer Tommy McCann popped the trunk of his cruiser to reveal thousands of dollars worth of military-grade equipment. [C-J/AKN]

WTF? Is there a war coming to Clarksville? [More C-J/AKN]

There was a ribbon cutting Monday afternoon for the new visitor center at the Stitzel-Weller distillery in Shively. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association says Stitzel-Weller will be the newest stop on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. [WHAS11]

Police in Pulaski County recently worked two incidents in a week’s time involving alleged drunk drivers on riding lawn mowers, including one arrested after he ​drove to the drive-through window at a fast-food restaurant, according to the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Office. [H-L]

The affidavit said after Oberhansley killed Blanton, he removed parts of her skull and brain, heart and part of a lung. The document said Oberhansley told detectives he cooked and ate the organs. [WLKY]

An astounding 72% percent of Americans say they are unhappy with Republicans in Congress. [HuffPo]

It could be the most important thing you do this week. A Louisville high school sophomore desperately needs a bone marrow match to win the fight he’s battled for three years. [WAVE3]

Was it really only a year ago that we were gearing up for the big unveil of Healthcare.gov where the uninsured could seamlessly go online and shop for health care as they would their vacation travel? [WaPo]

Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District has reached an agreement with the union that represents several of its employees. [WFPL]

Public schools throughout the nation continue to contend with budget shortfalls and insufficient classroom resources, while U.S. test scores remain far behind those of many other developed nations. Here are measures that can be taken to fix America’s troubled education system. [The Onion]

You guessed it — more of the same for the arena shenanigans. [Business First]

Complaints about the termination of a recycling program in Clark County’s unincorporated areas may prompt the county commissioners to bring it back — if the price is right. [News & Tribune]

OH NOES!!1! THE BIG SQUEEZE IS COMING!

Southern Indiana drivers who use I-65 can expect to add more time to their commute starting next week. Ohio River Bridges Project officials are calling this next phase of construction the “Big Squeeze.” [WDRB]

The revenue coming into a restructured taxing district to help finance the bonds for the KFC Yum! Center continues to increase. [C-J/AKN]

Deplorable and unsafe. That’s how hundreds of University of Louisville students are describing their new off campus housing. [WHAS11]

Leaders at Northern Kentucky University say they plan to travel around the state in an effort to spread the word about what makes the school special. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of students return to the classrooms at the University of Louisville on Monday morning. [WLKY]

The small city of Jennings, Mo., had a police department so troubled, and with so much tension between white officers and black residents, that the city council finally decided to disband it. Everyone in the Jennings police department was fired. New officers were brought in to create a credible department from scratch. That was three years ago. One of the officers who worked in that department, and lost his job along with everyone else, was a young man named Darren Wilson. [WaPo]

Ford’s Louisville Assembly Plant will celebrate the launch of the 2015 Lincoln MKC and announce a plant update Monday. [WAVE3]

Of course this Kentucky story made international news. Two Kentucky firefighters are being treated for severe burns after suffering electric shocks while helping students participate in the “ice bucket challenge”, local media report. [BBC]

The Louisville Metro Council can legally establish a local minimum wage within the city limits, according to a legal opinion issued Monday by Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell’s office. [WFPL & Press Release]

Alison Lundergan Grimes, the Democrat hoping to unseat Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.), thinks that “limited air strikes for humanitarian reasons and in support of our allies against terrorists are appropriate,” according to a campaign aide. [The Hill]

A regional infrastructure report issued by the Bluegrass Economic Advancement Movement this week shows the 22-county region between Lexington and Louisville needs to shore up its infrastructure deficiencies to compete nationally and on a global level for economic development. [Business First]

The Waste Water Department may have enough money to pay off an EPA-mandated project, but it’s going to be pretty tight, according to preliminary reports from Sycamore Advisors. [News & Tribune]

Hot Mess Called Cordish Is Just Making Excuses

Yes, kids, your tax dollars paid someone to say your tax dollars are hurting your tax dollars. KFC! Yum Center has actually “added competition and hurt” another taxpayer-subsidized entertainment venue in downtown Louisville: 4th Street Live. That’s according to a long-time Louisville real estate appraiser hired by the Cordish Co., the Baltimore-based developers that own and operate 4th Street Live. [WDRB]

Four crosswalks along Fourth Street are going to become works of art. The crosswalks at the intersections of Fourth at Broadway, York, Breckinridge and Kentucky streets will be painted as part of the SoBro ArtWalks Contest, which is seeking crosswalk designs. [C-J/AKN]

A plea deal has been reached for the former Louisville Metro Housing director and her mother. [WHAS11]

In 1964, former Gov. John Y. Brown Jr. and a group of investors paid $2 million to Kentucky Fried Chicken’s Col. Harland Sanders for his legendary chicken business and his secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices. [H-L]

The Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville announced Tuesday a $1 million gift from Sam Swope, founder of Sam Swope Auto Group. [WLKY]

The Gannett Company said on Tuesday that it planned to spin off its print operations, including USA Today, becoming the latest media company to break itself up. [NY Times]

As heroin deaths continue to rise throughout the Commonwealth, interest in an overdose antidote known as Naloxone or Narcan is being considered among law enforcement officials. [WAVE3]

Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession. [HuffPo]

Just a reminder that Greg Fischer has no idea what Louisvillians want or need. [WFPL]

Kentucky’s statewide rail plan is ready for review at the Transportation Cabinet. [Click the Clicky]

Owners of vacant and blighted properties in Lexington may soon face higher taxes. [Business First]

The Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency wants to hear from you. [News & Tribune]

Crazed Teatoots Vandalize Smoking Ban Signs

Are you a generous person or someone who loves animals? Help Jackson the Dachshund out ASAP, as he needs surgery! Jessica has been a tireless advocate for years and has definitely given more than she’s received. Let’s all pitch in. [Go Fund Me!]

A longtime educator with Jefferson County Public Schools has been named an assistant superintendent for the district who will oversee academics at 23 schools. [WDRB]

Despite two underperforming events in May and the postponement of the Paul McCartney and Miley Cyrus concerts, KFC Yum! Center officials said they expect to end the year with about $1.4 million in operating profit. [C-J/AKN]

A facility used to host meetings in downtown Louisville was reintroduced to the public Monday. [WHAS11]

The Derby City’s food scene has grown to include much more than juleps and hot Browns. [H-L]

The KFC Yum Center already attracts big crowds for University of Louisville basketball games and big-name concerts. Now the arena is offering entertainment with the summer plaza series. [WLKY]

If you missed it yesterday, the Education Professional Standards Board is making an epic move toward more secrecy and educational corruption. [Page One]

You can’t smoke in public buildings and workplaces in Louisville Metro. Now, Metro government is asking that you not smoke in park playgrounds and swimming pools where children are gathered. [WAVE3]

As a young Senate staffer in the early ’70s, I tended to form my opinions on the members based not on how they voted, but by how they treated us. [John Yarmuth]

Louisville is set to award franchise agreements to three private companies looking to bring ultra high-speed Internet service to the city. [WFPL]

Members of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee on Monday ripped the Veterans Affairs Department for covering up mistakes as it rushed to reduce its mammoth disability claims backlog. [The Hill]

When Louisville Metro Government wanted to monitor the air quality in locations across Louisville, it needed a product that hadn’t yet been produced by a commercial manufacturer. [Business First]

An officer who has claimed mistreatment failed to appear before the New Albany Police Merit Commission Thursday after requesting to be heard by the body. [News & Tribune]