Awful Jim Ramsey-UofL Soap Opera

All the sudden we’re just supposed to trust that Metro Animal Services is going to solve this dog shooting problem? Just like that? What the heck kind of short memory does this city even have? [WDRB]

Raising the stakes for University of Louisville President James Ramsey, two members of the board of trustees announced Thursday that they no longer support his presidency while the board’s chairman said he favors reducing the president’s powers. Don’t forget that Greenberg has never cared about Ramsey in the past. Not during any number of other scandals. Fascinating to see this turn. [C-J/AKN]

The Kennedy Bridge is shutting down for half a year and everyone is losing their mind. [WHAS11]

Louisville-based Brown-Forman announced on Thursday it is selling the Southern Comfort label, as well as Tuaca liqueur to New Orleans-based Sazerac, owner of Buffalo Trace, for a combined $543.5 million. [H-L]

The men police say brutally beat a woman and then dumped her body in a shallow grave faced a judge Thursday. [WLKY]

A former federal regulator and Elizabeth Warren acolyte who has repeatedly questioned the Obama administration’s treatment of student loan borrowers just took a job with the Department of Education. [HuffPo]

Tyler Russell was pronounced dead at University Hospital after being shot near the intersection of 20th Street and Market Street around 9:40 p.m. Wednesday. [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama has vigorously defended his legacy while striking an optimistic note for America’s future in his final State of the Union address. [BBC]

St. Matthews City Council members are distancing themselves from that city’s police department claim that juvenile crime is spiking in the Louisville suburb. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell’s life mission is to do anything and everything to be a roadblock for President Barack Obama. Even if that means screwing over his constituents. Because most of them are too disconnected and scared to notice. [Politico]

How much do you know about Kentucky Towers, Barrington Place and Crescent Centre? They think stories like this are worth paying for and they wonder why they’re still dying. [Business First]

City Controller Amy Deering is stepping down from her position with the city of Jeffersonville and taking a job with Louisville Metropolitan Government, said Mayor Mike Moore. [News & Tribune]

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Surprise! More Bad UofL & JCPS News

A lawsuit against “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell may never see the light of day. [WDRB]

Greg Fischer made two key additions to his administration Wednesday in areas dealing with Louisville’s public safety and public assistance. The mayor announced Rashaad Abdur-Rahman will be the new director of the Safe & Healthy Neighborhoods office and Eric Friedlander will serve as acting director of the Community Services department. [C-J/AKN]

Data from Jefferson County Public Schools shows that a new grading scale appears to have increased the number of students getting A grades in classes. [WHAS11]

Glad to see there’s nothing important left to worry about. The University of Kentucky has sometimes been criticized for being a campus of independent units, with academic, athletics and health care divisions operating more separately than together. On a symbolic level, UK officials have decided that will no longer be the case. [H-L]

What the hell is this story about the guy killed in the Highlands? What? No, really, what the hell is that story? [WLKY]

The “Seinfeld” writer who coined “Festivus” wants Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) to stop tweeting about his beloved secular holiday. [HuffPo]

A JCPS bus driver was assaulted and robbed by students. The incident, according to the bus union president, happened on Friday at the Detrick Nichols compound off Taylor Blvd. [WAVE3]

While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky business groups are backing legislation that would expand expungements of some felony convictions. [WFPL]

The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino have put pressure on local authorities to show they’re ready for that kind of violence. Some jurisdictions, such as Los Angeles, are stepping up exercises and terrorism simulations. [NPR]

With truckers in high demand, the online marketplace seeks to connect drivers with carriers that need something hauled. [Business First]

Some of Indiana’s grocery stores and liquor stores say a change in state law that allows alcohol sales on Christmas Day for the first time in decades won’t affect them because their stores are closed on that holiday. [News & Tribune]

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

This Jackie Green Bike Thing Is Great And Isn’t Getting Enough Press

Your support is crucial if you want to see us continue. While other media outlets ignore scandals like those in Montgomery County, we’re shining the bright lights of transparency on issues that directly impact you across the Commonwealth. Love us or hate us, we’re putting in the time and effort to spend years reporting on issues from the pension crisis to government-sanctioned animal cruelty to educational corruption and we get real results. [Help Us!]

Obscure alcohol rules are so dumb. Cold beer won’t be for sale in Indiana’s grocery or convenience stores any time soon. [WDRB]

A longtime advocate for cyclist- and pedestrian-friendly transportation policies rejected a plea agreement Monday in Jefferson District Court on charges of blocking traffic and running a red light while on a bike. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is moving forward with a $40 million project to widen Preston Highway from two to four lanes in Bullitt County. [WHAS11]

State Sen. Mike Wilson on Monday said he would file legislation in the 2016 General Assembly to allow public charter schools as part of a pilot in Fayette and Jefferson counties. [H-L]

At least Henry County seems to get it. Voters in Henry County have approved the full sale of alcohol across the county. [WLKY]

In a rare senatorial act, full-time Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio joined with a handful of fellow legislators on Friday in an attempt to block local municipalities from undercutting big telecom companies by providing cheap, fast internet service. This is the kind of thing Jamie Comer’s people — like Riggs Lewis — make happen. They work to kill municipal broadband, get rich off TWC, ATT and other providers. You can thank that set of Republican special interests for stifling competition and innovation. [The Intercept]

Metro Gubmint has a nearly $19 million surplus but don’t forget what’s suffered as a result. Metro Animal Services is always — ALWAYS — woefully underfunded. WIC clinics were slashed in a manner that made even Greg Fischer’s allies hate him. Streets are a disaster. Kids are hungry. People are homeless. [WAVE3]

Of course your new governor appointed a birther to his cabinet. Because of course he did. [Page One]

Matt Bevin’s newly appointed commissioner of revenue left his last job, at Lexmark International, after the Lexington-based technology company found a host of accounting errors and declared its internal financial controls to be deficient and in need of remediation. [WFPL]

Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer announced today that the sixth annual ‘Cram the Cruiser’ food drive netted 123 tons (246,705 lbs) of food for Kentucky families. [Press Release]

An FBI investigation of three University of Louisville officials involves the for-profit company that they operated out of the university. [Business First]

Leave it to mouth-breathers to freak out about the gays in Indiana. Sen. Travis Holdman hoped debate over his LGBT rights bill would weigh questions of religious liberty with the expansion of civil protections. [News & Tribune]

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Louisville Already Cringing Over Bevin

Louisville Metro Police say they’ve arrested two drug traffickers in southwest Louisville. [WDRB]

A coalition of social justice organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky and the Fairness Campaign, on Tuesday called on the Cordish Cos. to end dress codes at 4th Street Live! and acknowledge past racial profiling there. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Judge Denise Clayton says there is a better understanding of the racial makeup of Jefferson County jury pools although it’s impossible to know exactly the diversity of jury summons. [WHAS11]

Homeless two-parent families in Fayette County will soon have more housing options thanks to a new program designed to address a gap in Lexington’s homeless shelter system. [H-L]

The largest beer and wine wholesaler in Indiana is asking a state appeals court to find a law unconstitutional that prohibits beer wholesalers from seeking a permit to also distribute liquor. [WLKY]

With all the roadblocks thrown up by the Supreme Court, should school systems still try to pursue diversity? One district in North Carolina said yes and, as a new study shows, reaped solid rewards for the kids. [HuffPo]

When is it okay to go inside a stranger’s house and gawk at their furnishings and decorations? During the Old Louisville Holiday Home Tour, that’s when. [WAVE3]

Republican Gov.-elect Matt Bevin Tuesday named the head of a Louisville accounting firm as his budget director and said John Chilton will have much work to “get Kentucky’s financial crisis resolved.” [Ronnie Ellis]

A decision on whether pork processor JBS Swift can continue to use a Butchertown parking lot for truck staging has been pushed back once again. [WFPL]

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he’d gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country, there were skeptics. [NPR]

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford Motor Co. says it will create 2,000 jobs and invest $1.3 billion in its Kentucky Truck Plant on Chamberlain Lane in Louisville. [Business First]

State Rep. Ed Clere, R-New Albany, has been removed as chairman of the Indiana House of Representatives Public Health Committee. [News & Tribune]

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Oh Noes! Gays Are Invading Smoketown!

This is not in any way new or news. But leave it to the teevee folks to hype it up like it’s the end of the world. When Adniana Harris first heard that disruptive student behavior in Jefferson County Public Schools was causing some teachers to resign, the longtime bus driver wasn’t surprised. [WDRB]

There have been 76 homicides in Jefferson County in 2015. Five of them occurred within the week of Thanksgiving. [C-J/AKN]

Police are investigating a shooting near America’s Best Value Inn on Kemmons Drive near the Watterson-Newburg Road interchange. [WHAS11]

When John Saylor moved from Wilmore to Lexington recently, he purchased his home based in part on two large and leafy selling points — towering mature trees in the backyard, one a bur oak 40 inches in diameter. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The Harrison County Boys and Girls Club is helping a 76-year-old employee move into a safer home on Wednesday. [WLKY]

After Robert Lewis Dear was arrested for opening fire inside a Colorado Planned Parenthood clinic on Friday, he reportedly made a remark about “no more baby parts,” according to a law enforcement official. The revelation prompted a heated debate about what motivated Dear to allegedly target a reproductive health provider that has been under near-constant assault from Republicans in recent months. [HuffPo]

The gays are taking over everything. At least that’s how the wingnuts see it. [WAVE3]

If you’re a low-income woman, you’re more likely to get screened for breast cancer if you live in a state that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act than in a state that didn’t. [NPR]

The Louisville Zoo has sold 63 percent more beers this year than in 2014, the first year in which the city-owned attraction sold the alcoholic beverages. [WFPL]

When Robert Dear broke into the Colorado Spring Planned Parenthood on Friday afternoon, he didn’t make it past a locked door leading to the clinic’s center. Practitioners and patients on the other side had access to bulletproof vests. And as Dear moved through the parts of the facility he could enter, police watched him through the clinic’s live surveillance cameras. [ThinkProgress]

A new list is out that ranks the best public high schools in the U.S., and Kentucky’s entry is found in Louisville. [Business First]

Two employees of the Clark County Commissioners’ office have filed a civil tort against Integrity HR, Inc., which is the human resources company hired by the Clark County Commissioners. Office employees Elizabeth Murphy and Marjorie Jenkins are accusing Integrity and its Clark County agent Christina Reising of trying to fire Jenkins without following procedure and perhaps without cause, and of threatening to change Murphy’s job description if she did not help them in a “false management effort to fire Jenkins,” according to the claim filed Nov. 6. [News & Tribune]

All Kinds Of Compassionate Things Happening

It was almost a year ago when Jefferson County Public Schools officials presented an annual report to the school board about the district’s effort to recruit and hire more minority teachers. [WDRB]

Charter, with the assistance of people like Riggs Lewis, are *this close* to fleecing taxpayers by manipulating your legislative representation. [C-J/AKN]

Family members remember DeShawndre Davis as a charming man who loved to make people laugh. His father said he was at the wrong place at the wrong time when he was shot and killed on Dixie Highway last Sunday. [WHAS11]

Andy Beshear emphasizes that he is his own man, but family ties have been an enormous boon to the Democratic nominee for attorney general. [John Cheves]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! WATCH YOUR DATA! While surrounded by gunshot-wound survivors, community members and relatives, Andrea Davis expressed anger over a shooting during the funeral visitation for his son Deshawndre Davis. [WLKY]

Amid the heroin epidemic, there is little disagreement over the effectiveness of naloxone, the medication that can revive opioid addicts from an overdose. It has come to be seen as an essential tool to combat the skyrocketing number of overdoses. [HuffPo]

Wasn’t that fun, Compassionate City? A vehicle struck several juveniles, sending at least nine to the hospital, early Sunday morning in the Park Hill neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Remember the firefighter mess here in Possumbilly City? New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said on Friday the city had agreed to pay $75 million to settle a longstanding dispute with its firefighters over back wages, ending a quarrel in which he was threatened with house arrest. [Reuters]

Louisville Metro Department of Public Health is expanding the city’s syringe exchange program to a second location. [WFPL]

Kentucky, once a near Democratic monopoly, is seeing more voters register Republican and now has a Republican-majority congressional district for the first time since 1999. [Richmond Register]

These have been heady times for those in the domestic whiskey business. Especially for Louisville’s Brown-Forman, the home of Jack Daniel’s, Woodford Reserve, Old Forrester, and so many other notable brown water brands. [Business First]

The residents of Sellersburg chose the same person to be their clerk-treasurer for five straight elections. On Nov. 3, they won’t have that chance. Sellersburg residents will have to choose who will replace the late Dave Kinder. [News & Tribune]

JCPS Administrative Dumpster Fire Part 850

Oldham County voters will soon decide if alcohol will be sold throughout the county. [WDRB]

When will taxpayers have to stop paying Bonnie Hackbarth’s lying ass? [C-J/AKN]

Criticizing teachers probably isn’t the smartest thing for this principal to do. [More C-J/AKN]

Yet another reason Donna Hargens and her shady pal, Bonnie Hackbarth, have got to go. [WHAS11]

In the ever expanding universe of Kentucky bourbon, it can be hard to keep up with new distilleries and new things to sample. But it is so much fun trying. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Police are still investigating after a body was found inside a box. [WLKY]

A worsening political dispute on the front lines of the fight against the Islamic State group threatens one of the few silver linings for U.S. policy in the Middle East. [HuffPo]

A silent killer may be responsible for taking the lives of a Louisville couple. Deputy Coroner Cindy Thoene said Donald Hayes, 64, Barbara Hayes, 57, and their two dogs were discovered dead inside their home in the 9400 block of Dawson Hill Road around 3:15 p.m. on Oct.12. [WAVE3]

University of Louisville is investigating claims that a former staffer hired escorts to have sex with basketball players and recruits. [NPR]

People living with sickle cell disease may have a new treatment option that can cure them of the blood disorder. [WFPL]

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers? [ProPublica]

A new report from global commercial real estate firm Cushman & Wakefield and its Louisville affiliate, Commercial Kentucky Inc., shows a continual decline in office vacancy while projecting a somewhat rosy outlook for the local economy. [Business First]

The Clarksville Town Council shied away from granting start-up funds to the Homeless Coalition of Southern Indiana at Monday’s meeting. [News & Tribune]