When Will The Adults Be In Charge Of JCPS?

Help Kenn Parks. He deserves it. His son deserves it. [Give Back]

A JCPS official says EMS examined six students at Byck Elementary School on Cedar Street for frostbite after reports that they were suffering from exposure to the cold due to a lengthy wait at a bus stop. [WDRB]

Yep, a Senate foe who opposed expanded alcohol sales was arrested for DUI. [C-J/AKN]

A Louisville man is behind bars Thursday after police said he stole an ambulance and later crashed it in the Germantown-Schnitzelburg area. [WHAS11]

In his first speech on the Senate floor as majority leader, U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell expressed optimism for the future of the country and the congress despite a “moment of great anxiety as a nation.” [H-L]

An editor at an Elizabethtown newspaper issued a retraction and apology after he said Hardin County Sheriff John Ward was misquoted in Thursday’s paper. [WLKY]

Once again many in the media have fallen for GOP strategists’ attempts to make a candidate seem moderate — “soften” and “softening” seem to be the words of choice for CNN and others — while he’s not changed his hardcore right-wing position at all. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul pledged his support to new Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts, even as other lawmakers said politicians like Paul could complicate McConnell’s work. [WAVE3]

Micah Clark of the American Family Association explained to The Indianapolis Star that the bill would allow small businesses to refuse services to same-sex couples and also that it would allow adoption agencies to refuse to place children with same-sex couples. [Think Progress]

As the University of Louisville grapples with the terms of a controversial $6 million gift proposal from Papa John’s International CEO John Schnatter and billionaire Charles Koch, university-watchers might want to take a look at what Koch got for his money from his most recent taker, Arizona State University. [WFPL]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and Waze (http://www.waze.com), the real-time, “crowd-sourced” navigation app powered by the world’s largest communities of drivers, have entered into a partnership through the new Waze Connected Citizens program, the company’s largest municipal effort to date. [Press Release]

State law doesn’t say city and county governments cannot set their own minimum wage limits, but it doesn’t say they can, either. [Business First]

The New Albany City Council approved a third consecutive balanced budget in 2014. But several meetings included no voting items or only a nonbinding resolution for consideration, and Councilman John Gonder said he felt like there was more that could have been done by the city’s legislative body last year. [News & Tribune]

Hopefully Not Another Downtown Disappointment

Everyone hopes it comes to fruition but we’re already hearing from doubtful powerbrokers. An Omni hotel set for downtown will climb higher into the city skyline than initially planned, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Tuesday in outlining terms of a deal finalized last month. [WDRB]

That’s right — Greg Fischer loves keeping the worst of the worst on staff. When asked if Steve Rowland would continue to be a key member of his administration following his Friday arrest, Mayor Greg Fischer said “I certainly hope so.” [C-J/AKN]

One of the Louisville Zoo’s beloved polar bears is celebrating a birthday. [WHAS11]

Muhammad Ali is home after being hospitalized with a severe urinary tract infection. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The bitter cold has local homeless shelters gearing up for an influx of visitors. Crews are out this week trying to help who they can as even colder weather moves into the area. [WLKY]

Democrats and Social Security advocates are accusing House Republicans of launching a sneak attack on disability insurance on the very first day of the new Congress. [HuffPo]

After a video captured a raid inside of Louisville business the owner met with the Alcohol Beverage Control Board for a hearing about what they claim happened that night. [WAVE3]

Winter is not typically the busy season for Kuttawa (kuh-TAH-wah), a little vacation town on the north bank of Lake Barkley in far western Kentucky. But after the tragic plane crash on January 2 that left four dead and one miraculous survivor, Kuttawa exploded into high season, with as many reporters in town as vacationers renting pontoon boats on Fourth of July weekend. [Jim Higdon/The Daily Beast]

If you notice your memory isn’t what it used to be, you may be one of thousands of Kentuckians in the early stages of cognitive decline that could lead to Alzheimer’s. [WFPL]

Six Americans die from alcohol poisoning daily on average, and mortality rates are highest among middle-aged men, federal health authorities reported on Tuesday. [NY Times]

West Buechel Mayor Rick Richards announced at a special council meeting Tuesday that State Auditor Adam Edelen will examine the city’s books. [Business First]

Floyd County will end 2014 with a balance of $40,000, but it took some financial wheeling and dealing to get all accounts into the black. [News & Tribune]

2 Anti-Transparency Folks Sitting In Jail Tonight

NOTE: If you’re going to swipe our images/documents that we went through the trouble to obtain and pay for, give proper credit.

Some things are too good to set aside until Monday morning.

Like this:

Two high-ranking Louisville Metro Government officials were arrested Friday night.

Elizabeth Hoffman, Majority Caucus Director, and Steve Rowland, Chief Financial Officer, were both arrested for public intoxication and disorderly conduct.

Of course, Fischer offered up the typical excuse he uses when one of his people ends up getting arrested on alcohol-related charges. How many does this make, now?

Rowland has been at the center of keeping information from reaching the public eye. He was the star shit denier during the Metro Council’s lengthy whistleblower investigation.

And Hoffman, at the behest of Jim King, has consistently run interference for Fischer’s myriad nightmares. She spent weeks and weeks threatening and attempting to silence Democratic members of the Ad Hoc committee.

Wondering why things have been so screwed up?

There you go. Fischer’s guy and King’s lady. Both sitting in jail.

UPDATE

There’s more from WAVE:

According to Louisville Metro police, Rowland and Hoffman were approached by management at El Nopal on Zorn Avenue and asked to leave due to heavy intoxication and provocative intimate behavior.

Witnesses then reported seeing the two go inside of a white SUV. Officers approached the vehicle in the parking lot and determined Rowland or Hoffman were both too intoxicated to drive.

How sweet.

Bets on how long it takes Greg Fischer to give Rowland a raise and a commendation upon his return to work?

UPDATE

Metro Council’s Democratic Caucus released the following statement this morning:

“Members of the Democratic Caucus are aware of this situation. The public expects proper conduct at all times from Metro Government employees and what happened is unfortunate. The Caucus will review this situation to determine if any action is necessary according to Caucus Rules.”

That’s fun.

UPDATE

What most media outlets aren’t reporting is… well, everything in Steve Rowland’s citation.

Take a look:


CLICK TO ENLARGE

Here’s the best part:

Charge 1: ALCOHOL INTOX IN A PUBLIC PLACE (1ST AND 2ND OFFENSE)
Charge 2: DISORDERLY CONDUCT, 2ND DEGREE

Officers were dispatched to listed location on two subjects who were asked to leave location due to heavy intoxication and provocative intimate behavior. Caller stated they saw subjects get into a white SUV and believed they were having sexual relations. Officers made contact with listed subjects. Above subject was in vehicle in a state of disrobe in public view. Above subject smelled strongly of Alcoholic beverage, glassy eyes, and unsteady. Subject and friend were manifestly under the influence and no condition to drive and no where to go to ensure their safety. Subjects were already told to leave the premise by management of the El Nopal. Subject was a danger to himself, and caused public alarm. Co-Defendant: Elizabeth Hoffman.

You can probably figure out what that means on your own.

And the “white SUV”? Could that be a government-owned vehicle?

Possibility City is manifestly under the influence of a hot mess and dearth of leadership.

UPDATE

Yep, it was a city vehicle.

Turns out it was a patron who called the cops – not the restaurant. Fascinating.

Here’s A Good Morning You-Know-What Sandwich

An LG&E natural gas pipeline that ruptured in Oldham County in September caused $1.3 million in property damage and other costs, according to the utility’s report to federal safety regulators. [WDRB]

Attorney General Jack Conway appointed another special prosecutor to handle the ongoing dispute over whether Louisville Metro Councilman David James is serving in two incompatible public positions. [C-J/AKN]

Another day, another fun shooting in Possibility City. Louisville Metro Police are working a fatal shooting on 2100 block of Ratcliffe Avenue just west Dixie Highway. [WHAS11]

Sales of spirits are accelerating into the festive season, according to Brown-Forman. The Louisville-based parent of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Woodford Reserve reported that sales for the second quarter were up 5 percent to nearly $1.14 billion. For the first half of the financial year net sales are up 4 percent, the company said. [H-L]

We’re blown away that wingnuts aren’t screaming satanism or whatever. Good Morning Dragons is a yoga program at South Oldham Middle School that has kids bending and twisting into yoga poses before the first bell. [WLKY]

Muhammad Ali on Saturday posted a selfie on his Instagram to cheer on Louisville against Kentucky in college football. “#Louisville Game Day! Go Cards!” the caption read. [HuffPo]

This is why Clark County can’t have nice things. She makes decisions that affect thousands of students, but several months ago she made a decision that landed her in jail. Despite admitting to felony theft, Teresa Perkins took her seat on the Greater Clark County School Board Tuesday night and she says she’s not resigning. [WAVE3]

Did UPS discriminate against a pregnant worker by letting her go? Women’s reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups. [NPR]

James McGaugh is the recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for psychology, the University of Louisville announced Tuesday evening. [WFPL]

A growing number of cable companies are implementing data caps (sorry — “data thresholds”), which put limits on how much data a subscriber could use before facing penalties ranging from warning messages to throttled speeds to overage fees. A new report from the federal Government Accountability Office says that lack of competition in the broadband market could result in these caps being implemented with no one benefiting other than cable companies’ bottom lines. [Consumerist]

Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) recently began cranking out its new aluminum body F-150 trucks. Since then, there’s been plenty of speculation about whether the new body would be carried over to other vehicles, including the F-Series Super Duty Trucks made in Louisville. [Business First]

Another fun scandal is brewing at the University of Louisville. The VP of Human Resources was canned and escorted away by cops. [The ‘Ville Voice]

The legal bills of a Jeffersonville resident who sued MAC Construction and Excavating Inc. and the city of Jeffersonville over a neighboring asphalt plant have been paid by a laborers’ union. [News & Tribune]

Yarmuth To Push Council On Minimum Wage

Louisville police have started a new search for a company to outfit officers with body cameras, slowing down an effort already behind the department’s self-imposed schedule. [WDRB]

To get a feel for just how bitter the contract dispute is between the Metropolitan Sewer District and one of its two unions, Laborers International Union of North America Local 576, just read a letter a union organizer tells me me LIUNA delivered to the board. [C-J/AKN]

Indiana alcohol sales will be legal for an extra hour on Sunday morning with the end of daylight saving time. [WHAS11]

“We’ve had people come from all over America to help us ditch Mitch,” said Bill Londrigan, president of Kentucky’s AFL-CIO. Asking for a show of hands from those who had traveled from out of state, Londrigan encouraged those whose hands shot up to say where they were from, and shouts of Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey rang out from the crowd. [H-L]

Two LMPD officers are on administrative duties after a man police say fired at those officers was killed. [WLKY]

During Obama’s first five years as president, the Justice Department and the U.S. military brought seven criminal prosecutions for national security leaks — more than twice as many as all previous presidents put together. [Yahoo]

The candidates for Floyd County Sheriff are criticizing each other for lacking the experience necessary for the job. [WAVE3]

His Democratic opponent argues Republican U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell supports tax breaks that encourage businesses to ship jobs overseas. But that message won’t get much support at Campbellsville Apparel, a textile company which supplies materials for federal government contracts and which employs a lot of folks who once worked at Fruit of the Loom — a company which moved jobs from Kentucky to Mexico. [Ronnie Ellis]

With her back turned, Jo Ann Smith couldn’t see if the approaching bus was the one she was waiting for. Her bus would come from the west, but standing at the corner of Fifth Street and Broadway, she positioned herself to the east because on Monday the blustery wind was full of leaves. She didn’t want a face full of fall foliage. [WFPL]

On Thursday afternoon, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) will testify before the Louisville Metro Council’s Labor and Economic Development Committee. Yarmuth will discuss the proposed ordinance to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour in Louisville. [Press Release]

The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis has named a new leader for its Louisville branch. [Business First]

The poverty rate in Southern Indiana increased by nearly 60 percent from 2000 to 2010 after decreasing by 12 percent in the 1990s, according to a study by an Indiana University Southeast research team. [News & Tribune]

Nothing To See, Move Along, Name A Baby Hippo

Two years after the death of Bryan Lewis, his family says it will not give up on the search for his killer. [WDRB]

A deputy sheriff who was suspended for 15 days for reporting that Jefferson District Court Judge Gina Kay Calvert had talked about her campaign on the record in open court has sued Sheriff John Aubrey, saying he violated the state whistleblower act. The good old boy system is alive and well in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Former WHAS 11 reporter Chuck Olmstead was on the air for 30 years, but his life was cut short after a brain aneurysm. [WHAS11]

A beer giant’s application for a distribution license in a western Kentucky city has stirred complaints that the venture would upset the state’s long-held system for distribution of alcohol. [H-L]

A thing about a hippo at the zoo is apparently the biggest news in town. [WLKY]

President Barack Obama seems to have changed his tune on gay marriage, telling The New Yorker’s Jeffrey Toobin he believes same-sex couples in all 50 states should be allowed to marry under the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution. [HuffPo]

The application period to register students in Jefferson County middle and high schools for the 2015-2016 school year is now open. [WAVE3]

When the Bush administration revealed in 2005 that it was secretly interpreting a treaty ban on “cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment” as not applying to C.I.A. and military prisons overseas, Barack Obama, then a newly elected Democratic senator from Illinois, joined in a bipartisan protest. [NY Times]

The shock of the recession still lingers in public schools across Kentucky. [WFPL]

Jeff Leen, the Washington Post’s assistant managing editor for investigations, begins his renewed attack on the late Gary Webb’s Contra-cocaine reporting with a falsehood. [Click the Clicky]

Of course the airport is suing a neighborhood. Of course it is. Because that’s how things work in Louisville. [Business First]

Clark County Republican Party Chairman Jamey Noel said Tuesday in an email to the News and Tribune that political events were held in 2013 at a building owned by the ambulance company he runs, and promised to have the party pay for the times it was used. [News & Tribune]

With economic recession further receding, Louisville Water Co. has resumed a performance-based bonus system for top employees – one that rewards its executives, managers and supervisors if they meet team goals. [More C-J/AKN]

The Tolling Situation: Still Puppies & Rainbows

What? The new tolling operator has never actually operated a tolling system? Surely not! That’s surely not the case for Possibility City, is it? [WDRB]

The board of Louisville Water Company set parameters for CEO Jim Brammell Tuesday about his recent DUI and speeding arrest and established requirements for him to meet in coming weeks. Really? No mention of his past careless traffic-related incidents? No mention of the ongoing dramas inside LWC involving Brammell? Wow. Fischer’s office has received complaints but he’s once again sweeping something under the rug. [C-J/AKN]

Hundreds of people showed up to help a Trinity High School student battle leukemia. [WHAS11]

Of course she was arrested. You expected something different in Jessamine County? Just days after being convicted of careless driving, a Central Kentucky bicyclist was arrested. [WKYT]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO RUINS THIS STORY! Police continue to investigate the motive behind a shooting that took the life of 16-month-old Ne’Riah Miller last month. [WLKY]

Despite five years of economic recovery, poverty is still stubbornly high in America. More than 45 million people, or 14.5 percent of all Americans, lived below the poverty line last year, the Census Bureau reported. [HuffPo]

A resident long attentive to Jeffersonville politics is suing the city’s redevelopment commission over what he claims is a violation of state law in selling a 10-acre property at 10th and Spring streets. [WAVE3]

If you want to know why Mitch McConnell has begun to pull away from Alison Grimes in all of the recent polling, look no further than Grimes’ TV ad from earlier this week. Oh snap. It gets worse: McConnell’s campaign has decided what this campaign is about. And Grimes’ team has let him do it. McConnell’s team deserves a lot of credit, but it doesn’t even appear Grimes has even tried to make McConnell OWN Washington’s dysfunction. [NBC News]

Louisville Metro Housing Authority is one of 11 recipients nationally of a grant to pursue green building certification for an entire neighborhood. [WFPL]

Remember Robert Felner’s man, John Deasy? Look at the ridiculous mess he’s still up to in Los Angeles. [LA Times]

The public will see a brand develop, a public outreach effort start and an advertising campaign, all to inform them about tolls, according to a presentation at the Ohio River Bridges Project Joint Board meeting Monday. [Business First]

David White said he would push to unify city-county government, expand the downtown business district to the riverfront and develop public-private partnerships if elected as mayor of New Albany. [News & Tribune]