Oldham Co. Should Embrace The Booze

There are only a few places in all of Oldham County where people can buy packaged alcohol like wine or a case of beer. But with more petitions going out this week, there’s a possibility that may soon change. [WDRB]

Downtown leaders tried to calm some jittery nerves Friday by predicting their hard work should minimize any loss of business from the impending two-year closure of the Kentucky International Convention Center. [C-J/AKN]

Watching Donna Hargens mangle this bus incident was almost as terrifying as hearing about a child being dragged. [WHAS11]

A Lawrence County school bus full of students on their way to school started on fire Friday, authorities said. [H-L]

Kentucky recently became one of the first states to let pharmacists dispense without prescription a drug that can reverse a heroin overdose. [WLKY]

Lorca Henley of Bowling Green, Ohio, said her family’s dinners on different nights this week included taco salads, tuna casserole with mashed potatoes, spaghetti with meat sauce and hamburgers they fried on the stove because they were out of propane. [HuffPo]

The mother of the girl dragged by a Jefferson County Public Schools bus said Sunday night that her daughter had been discharged from Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WAVE3]

This is not bourbon and the story will likely cause you to pop a vein. [NPR]

Apryll Buege spent much of her youth in the foster care system. She said she got in some trouble, made some mistakes, but soon realized she needed to pull her life together. [WFPL]

Duke Energy Corp. pleaded guilty Thursday to criminal pollution charges and agreed to $102 million in federal penalties stemming from a February 2014 spill of coal ash waste. [The Hill]

A record crowd turned out to see American Pharoah capture the second jewel of the Triple Crown at Saturday’s Preakness Stakes. [Business First]

Former Democratic congressman Baron Hill plans to join Indiana’s U.S. Senate race to replace retiring Republican Dan Coats. [News & Tribune]

Only Thing Worse Than Fischer Transparency Is JCPS Transparency

Despite concerns about increased class sizes and a lack of details on how it would be implemented, the Jefferson County Board of Education approved a plan to merge two of its alternative schools and make structural changes at three other alternative sites on Monday night. [WDRB]

On a train from London to Hull, Matthew Barzun decided to check the web to see what famous people were from the Yorkshire city he was about the visit. The former Louisville Internet entrepreneur knows his way around mathematics and theory, so he was excited to discover that John Venn was from Hull. [C-J/AKN]

JCPS is considering pulling hundreds of thousands of dollars in funding for schools all tied to junk food. [WHAS11]

Rand Paul likes to say that the Republican Party should follow the advice of painter Robert Henri, who said people should “paint like a man coming over a hill singing.” [H-L]

Don’t hold your breath about the level of actual transparency, according to JCPS insiders. Jefferson County Public Schools announced the launch of a “citizen transparency” website Monday night. [WLKY]

The Justice Department urged a federal appeals court Monday to reverse a hold a judge placed on President Barack Obama’s immigration executive action. [HuffPo]

Graduation dates for Jefferson County Public High School students have been released. [WAVE3]

In many municipalities around the country, the days of sorting your recyclables for curbside pickup are long gone, replaced by a system called “single-stream” recycling. But what happens after all those bits of plastic, paper, glass and metal trash get put in the bin? [NPR]

The number of jobs within Louisville area residents’ typical commute distances decreased 11 percent from 2000 to 2012, according to a report released this month by the Brookings Institution. [WFPL]

Hundreds of middle and high school students from across the state traveled to Eastern Kentucky University on Saturday to exhibit their science experiments at the Kentucky Science and Engineering Fair. [Richmond Register]

Kyle and Dustin Staggers already own two restaurants on Bardstown Road — Rumplings and Roux — and they’re working on a third Highlands restaurant called “America. The Diner” at 814 Cherokee Road. [[Business First]]

Mike Pence set aside his longtime opposition to programs that give needles to drug users amid pleas from health officials and conservative legislators to respond to the spreading HIV outbreak in Scott County. [News & Tribune]

Compassionate Cities Don’t Have So Many Murders

Internal reviews conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education at three of Jefferson County’s lowest performing schools show progress is being made towards improving achievement, but that some changes must still be made. [Toni Konz]

Does anyone really buy into this Fischer transparency schtick anymore? n the wake of criticisms that public officials were deleting electronic messages, Mayor Greg Fischer Monday said that every person serving on a board or commission will be issued an email address to conduct all official government business. [C-J/AKN]

Two of Louisville’s largest employers are urging Kentucky lawmakers to reject Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s push for the state to allow a local option sales tax. [WHAS11]

A move to raise the minimum wage in Kentucky’s largest city has resulted in a lawsuit. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Another day, another couple of senseless murders in Possibility City. [WLKY]

To Washington insiders he is Dr Evil: the hidden orchestrator of industry campaigns against the Humane Society, Mothers against Drunk Driving, and other seemingly uncontroversial groups. Now Richard Berman, a one-time lobbyist turned industry strategist, has zeroed in on another target: Barack Obama’s new power plant rules. [HuffPo]

What began as a call for help along Interstate 71 ended with police discovering a car crash with a man shot dead inside Wednesday. The shooting forced southbound I-71 closed near the Gene Snyder Freeway for hours impacting travel for hundreds of people. [WAVE3]

Brown-Forman is among 16 organizations across the United States recognized for climate action. [EPA]

The recent revelation that breathalyzer tests are video recorded at the Louisville jail may lead to an influx of filings to re-opened drunk driving cases in the near future. [WFPL]

Wanna dig through Churchill Downs’ quarterly and full year earnings results? [External PDF Link]

The Kentucky Derby Festival unveiled its 2015 Pegasus Pins at an event at Hard Rock Café and it doesn’t suck. [Business First]

Slick, icy roads didn’t stop New Albany residents from packing the Carnegie Center for Art & History to discuss a hot-button issue Saturday. [News & Tribune]

Fischer Continues Fight To Raise Your Taxes

Kentucky is trying to do more to protect victims of dating violence. [WDRB]

With mayoral and city council primaries less than three months away, Jeffersonville Mayor Mike Moore will deliver his annual State of the City address Tuesday at a Jeffersonville Rotary Club luncheon. [C-J/AKN]

While George Junior went to Frankfort to beg for the right to raise your taxes, Rome continued to burn. [WHAS11]

A proposal to shore up the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System with the state’s largest-ever bond issue won approval Tuesday by the House Appropriations and Revenue Committee. [H-L]

Greg Fischer will officially illuminate the Big Four Bridge in a celebration planned for Wednesday evening. [WLKY]

The U.S. government is creating a new agency to monitor cybersecurity threats, pooling and analyzing information on a spectrum of risks, a senior Obama administration official said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Surely no one actually drinks this Angel’s Envy stuff. [WAVE3]

The Supreme Court is reviewing lethal injection for the first time in seven years. [ProPublica]

Here’s your NO DUH moment of the year. Records shed little light on vetting of new University of Louisville executive from scandal-plagued school. [WFPL]

House Democrats plan to hear their own version of a bill to combat the rise in heroin usage in Kentucky but the bill’s primary sponsor says he’s highly confident any differences can be worked out with the Republican Senate which has already passed its own measure. [Ronnie Ellis]

This might be a case of ending up with more than you bargained for. Last year, Anheuser-Busch LLC, a Louisville-based distributor owned by multinational beverage giant Anheuser-Busch InBev, purchased Budweiser of Owensboro, a previously unaffiliated distributorship. [Business First]

Though Groundhog Day was Monday, some New Albany officials feel like they’ve been through this scenario before. [News & Tribune]

Frankfort Democrats May Just Be The Worst

By a unanimous vote, Councilman David Tandy (D-4) was elected President of the Louisville Metro Council for the remainder of 2015 during the Council’s regular meeting on Thursday night. Maybe he’ll visit Cordish again and sign a non-disclosure agreement, refusing to reveal what he discovers to the public. Or maybe he’ll use his council staff as a babysitter again. So many opportunities. [Press Release]

Students, staff and alumni at Fern Creek Traditional High School are seeking to rename the school Fern Creek High School. [WDRB]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday delivered a blow to Metropolitan Sewer District management, providing an opinion that there’s no legal reason why the agency’s board could not agree to a contract provision requested by one of its unions. [C-J/AKN]

The Kentucky Attorney General’s office has joined in the criminal investigation into the troubled Southeast Bullitt Fire Department. [WHAS11]

Food prices across Kentucky continue to rise, increasing 1. 7 percent in the last quarter of 2014. According the Kentucky Farm Bureau Marketbasket Survey, the cost of 40 basic grocery items averaged $129.14 in the last quarter. It’s the seventh consecutive quarter of rising prices and represents an all-time high. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! A doctor who practiced in Louisville and southern Indiana was charged Wednesday by a federal grand jury with prescribing pain medications that resulted in the deaths of five patients, health care fraud and unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances. [WLKY]

A bill that would redefine a full-time work week under the Affordable Care Act as 40 hours instead of 30 actually amounts to a break for corporations, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) argued in a hearing Thursday. [HuffPo]

The era of prohibiting alcohol sales on Sundays in Indiana might be over soon. [WAVE3]

Johnny Bell, D-Glasgow, the new state House majority whip, informed his predecessor’s staff Wednesday that they would be replaced – including Yolanda Costner, one of the women suing the legislature over allegations of sexual harassment by former Rep. John Arnold. [Ronnie Ellis]

A majority of Kentuckians think that the state’s domestic violence laws should include unmarried couples who haven’t live together and those who don’t share a child, according to a poll released Thursday. [WFPL]

Prompted by an investigation by ProPublica and NPR, Sen. Charles Grassley asks a Missouri nonprofit hospital to explain why it seizes the wages of thousands of its patients. [ProPublica]

Mayor Greg Fischer announced Tuesday that Louisville’s Office of Sustainability has launched a “green” infrastructure incentive program for businesses. [Business First]

Mayor Jeff Gahan has requested Time Warner Cable pursue strategies for Gigabit connections on a trial basis for some areas of New Albany. The city has been exploring a permanent Gigabit connection to provide high-speed Internet options for customers in New Albany. In a press release issued Friday, the city announced the trial areas will include downtown, the Purdue Research Park and Indiana University Southeast. [News & Tribune]

Reducing Violence In Possibility City Is Great

Reducing violent deaths in Louisville is the goal of a new campaign, which is focusing on what everyone can do to support the effort. [WDRB]

New Louisville hotels are among the short-term threats to growing Southern Indiana tourism, according to a new marketing report that also lists strengths, weaknesses and possible opportunities in Clark and Floyd Counties. [C-J/AKN]

A Metro Council employee, charged with public intoxication and disorderly conduct will have to wait a few weeks before getting her day in court. [WHAS11]

One of the state’s biggest bigots opposes medical marijuana. Because, like all other things he’s afraid of, he doesn’t understand it. The leader of the state’s largest religious organization voiced opposition Tuesday to a proposal in the state legislature that would make it legal for people to use marijuana in Kentucky for medical purposes. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The board overseeing Kentucky’s role in the Ohio River Bridges Project met Tuesday. [WLKY]

Whaaaat??? Thought Greg Fischer said Louisville was the best beer city in the world? [HuffPo]

Mayor Greg Fischer said he was evaluating the “steps forward” after his chief financial officer was accused of drunk and intimate behavior with a subordinate’s wife. [WAVE3]

The US solar boom is taking off at breathtaking speed—even though solar is still a tiny slice of the American energy pie, it has by far the fastest growth of any energy source, and it’s adding jobs apace. [Mother Jones]

In the wake of a massive tire fire in November that burned for a day and left residents in southwestern Louisville under a shelter-in-place, the company responsible is beginning a series of steps to assess the environmental damage. [WFPL]

Plenty of cities tear them down, but Seattle Mayor Ed Murray (D) wants his city to build three new tent encampments for the homeless. [Think Progress]

Mid City Mall will be receiving an updated exterior with new metal awnings, a metal roof and a brick facade. [Business First]

A familiar disagreement between some members of the New Albany City Council and the Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County has a new twist. [News & Tribune]

Individual Dry Precincts In A City Like This: Crazy

The Louisville community paid homage to a fallen leader Monday morning: Jim King, former president of Louisville Metro Council. [WDRB]

It’s dumb as hell that there are dry precincts in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Of course Kentucky made the list of ten states with the most people on food stamps. [WHAS11]

Charter schools would be an option for parents seeking the best educational fit for their children, most proponents believe. But those who oppose charters believe the schools will suck money from an already financially strapped public school system. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Monday is the national holiday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Louisville is focusing on giving back to the community on this 12th annual MLK Day of Service. [WLKY]

The rich keep getting richer, and by next year, just a handful of the upper-class will have accumulated more than half of the world’s wealth. A new report released on Monday by Oxfam warns that this deepening global inequality is unlike anything seen in recent years. [HuffPo]

What? A couple more people got shot in Possibility City? Surely not! [WAVE3]

President Barack Obama will deliver his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday at 9 p.m. EST. Although it is bound to contain some surprises, the White House has spent two weeks rolling out many of the themes he plans to highlight. [Reuters]

The purpose of the gathering on Thursday was to present the results of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affair’s environmental assessment for Louisville’s new Robley Rex VA Medical Center. [WFPL]

The trade in bees used for honey or to pollinate crops could have a devastating impact on wild bees and other insects, say scientists. [BBC]

Kentucky awarded nine high-tech companies $2.7 million at the end of last year. The companies, four of which are based in Louisville, were funded through Kentucky’s matching funds programs for small-business innovation research and technology transfer, known as SBIR and STTR. [Business First]

Charlestown native and Army veteran LaDon Thornhill is the first to enter this year’s Charlestown mayoral election. [News & Tribune]