Closing Bars At 2:00 A.M. Is Just Silly

Sometimes what’s not your fault becomes your problem. “If they’re going to make these decisions, then they need to be held responsible for them, and not us,” said Wes Stafford, a Hillview resident. “They’re going to cover their tail by passing it off to us. We don’t like that.” [WDRB]

Mayor Greg Fischer is asking community leaders to take a tour of Heaven Hill’s distillery in western Louisville next month to educate them about the organic waste material that will be used at a proposed methane plant. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville Metro Police investigating a person’s death after a shooting in Old Louisville Sunday evening. [WHAS11]

When visitors descend on Lexington in late October for the Breeders’ Cup, they will be here primarily for the finest Thoroughbreds in the world. But they should stick around after the races to see what else the commonwealth has to offer. And there’s plenty. [H-L]

There will be no layoffs at Neighborhood Place Centers across Louisville. The Community Services Program provides assistance to low-income families. At a special meeting of the Metro Council, council members learned that the proposal to lay off employees has been rescinded. [WLKY]

Louisville can definitely handle a public market like this. For nearly four decades, the Union Square Greenmarket has served as a grand bazaar in Lower Manhattan, where produce, baked goods, flowers and foodstuffs are hauled in from the countryside (or some Brooklyn bakery) four days a week. And almost anyone can afford to shop there. [HuffPo]

A party is creating an uproar on social media for what’s being called a lack of respect for the dead. Pictures of the party’s setup near or in a cemetery have been shared dozens of times on Facebook. People who have worked to keep up the abandoned Eastern Cemetery on Baxter Avenue say it’s the latest insult to the people buried there. [WAVE3]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Some bar owners in Louisville say the city’s burgeoning bourbon and food scene could take a hit if the Metro Council changes closing times from 4 a.m. to 2 a.m. But leave it to Tom Owen to do something dumb. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

Generation Tux, the startup online tuxedo rental company, could end up bringing more than the 80 jobs originally planned to Louisville, the company’s chief technology officer, Matt Howland, said in an interview with Louisville Business First Thursday. [Business First]

The Indiana Supreme Court upheld a Floyd County court’s decision to sentence a Southern Indiana man to the death penalty Thursday following his conviction for brutally murdering his mother’s friend in April 2012. [News & Tribune]

Everything’s All Puppies & Rainbows

The head of the Federal Railroad Administration is urging railroads to be more forthcoming about the health of bridges that carry trains. [WDRB]

We forgot about this story during the TERLIT TWEETIN hullabaloo. Calling the decision “naïve” and “clumsy,” Metro Council members ripped a previously undisclosed plan by Mayor Greg Fischer’s office to reorganize how the city operates Neighborhood Place locations — a plan the city formed without input from other center partners, including state government and Jefferson County Public Schools. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky’s Independent candidate for governor is gaining name recognition for his performance during the Bluegrass Debate. [WHAS11]

Every fall, bourbon lovers make a pilgrimage to Kentucky for two things: the Kentucky Bourbon Festival, which runs through Sunday in Bardstown, and the fall bourbon releases. [H-L]

The owners of the troubled Economy Inn motel on Bardstown Road which has been the subject of numerous complaints about crime and drugs, is notified about the possible suspension of the hotel’s permit. [WLKY]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) are calling for a ban on the ability of employers to check the credit history of their employees, saying that the practice is a form of discrimination unfairly targets people who have suffered as a result of the 2008 financial crisis. [HuffPo]

Oldham County won’t be holding a special election September 29 to decide whether to allow sales of packaged alcohol. [WAVE3]

You can’t have a government that has spent decades waging various forms of war against predominantly Muslim countries – bombing 7 of them in the last six years alone – and then act surprised when a Muslim 14-year-old triggers vindictive fear and persecution because he makes a clock for school. That’s no more surprising than watching carrots sprout after you plant carrot seeds in fertile ground and then carefully water them. It’s natural and inevitable, not surprising or at all difficult to understand. [The Intercept]

The number of Kentuckians receiving tax credits through the federal health care law to reduce the cost of insurance is among the lowest in the country. And a state official says that shows Kentucky’s health insurance exchange is working the way it’s supposed to. [WFPL]

American household incomes lost ground last year and the poverty rate ticked up, a sign the U.S. economic expansion had yet to lead to gains for many Americans five years after the 2007-2009 recession. [Reuters]

Some Louisville workers haven’t seen their pay grow fast enough to keep up with the national inflation rate during the last five years, an analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show. [Business First]

It looks like it will be another month before the Floyd County Council decides whether or not to cut $28,000 from Floyd County Circuit Court probation and another $34,707 from Floyd Superior Court probation. [News & Tribune]

It’s Time For Some More Bridge Hype

A new Phoenix Hill Distillery has been shut down for illegal production, according to the local Alcoholic Beverage Control. [WDRB]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

The city is asking residents to help Louisville’s homeless veterans take better care of their feet as more former military service members living on the street come forward. [C-J/AKN]

An elementary student is recovering after a car hit them crossing the street near his school. Possibility City! [WHAS11]

A needle exchange program, designed to combat the spread of blood-borne diseases, will begin taking used needles and distributing clean ones Friday at the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! GLENN DOESN’T REALIZE HOW DUMB THIS IS! But you should for real go to Worldfest this weekend. [WLKY]

In July, Café Art, a U.K.-based arts initiative, gave 100 Fujifilm disposable cameras to homeless people in London with just one instruction: take photographs that capture “My London.” [HuffPo]

It’s expected to open by January and the anticipation is building. Decades in the making, the Downtown Crossing is just about complete. [WAVE3]

With the school year just beginning in many districts, parents at two schools are already expressing outrage that transgender students are being allowed to use the bathrooms that match their identities. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville Metro Council members are taking umbrage at excessively tall grass on vacant lots in the city. [WFPL]

Kim Davis and the anti-gay hate group representing her. Don’t be fooled — the organization representing the woman refusing to give out marriage licenses in Kentucky is no ordinary law firm. They have a history of anti-gay hate and bigotry. [Click the Clicky]

Two Louisville-based development companies, including one that recently helped secure a deal to bring a second Costco Wholesale Corp. store to Louisville, are buying land in Jeffersonville and appear set on adding heavy retail to a corridor between a Meijer store and the River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Floyd County Council President Matt Oakley sent a letter to New Albany City Council President Pat McLaughlin on June 9 requesting a meeting concerning the agreement governing the joint animal shelter. [News & Tribune]

Can We Just All Focus On The West End? Just For Once? Please?

Oldham County voters may soon decide whether to expand alcohol sales. The Oldham County Chamber of Commerce says it now has enough signatures to ask for a special election. [WDRB]

Members of Greater Louisville Inc., the metro chamber of commerce, have scheduled a series of meetings with Jefferson County legislators in early September to discuss business-related issues as well as legislation expected to come up during the 2016 General Assembly convening in January. [C-J/AKN]

On a stage set to celebrate the Commonwealth’s deep agricultural roots, Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) 52nd annual Country Ham Breakfast & Auction concluded Thursday morning, Aug. 27, with a show-stealing $400,000 bid for the Kentucky State Fair’s Grand Champion Ham. [WHAS11]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Arrests were made Thursday morning at the annual ham breakfast at the Kentucky State Fair. [WLKY]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

The goal to bring 43 new homes to the Russell neighborhood started a decade ago, and Thursday, Mayor Greg Fischer announced a plan to make good on that promise. [WAVE3]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

Jim Wathen has been selling military merchandise at the Kentucky State Fair for nearly a decade. By noon on a recent weekday, he had already restocked a rack of Confederate flags. He said the 3-by-3-inch Confederate flag, his top seller, is a piece of military history. [WFPL]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

A study released Wednesday shows that congested roads are costing the typical Louisville metro area driver more than 40 hours in delays annually and almost $1,050 in lost time and burned fuel. [Business First]

Former New Albany Police Department Officer Laura Schook is proceeding with a federal case against the city as well as an appeal of the decision to fire her in May, and she’s doing so without an attorney. [News & Tribune]

The Compassionate Murders Continue

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. LMPD homicide detectives are investigating after a man was shot and killed in Louisville’s Shawnee neighborhood early Tuesday. [WDRB]

In about six months Kentucky courts must offer emergency civil legal protections for a member of a dating couple in an abusive or violent relationship, but court officials across the state first must figure out how to make the new law work in their courts. [C-J/AKN]

Oldham County only needs about 1,200 signatures to expand packaged alcohol sales to groceries, convenience stores and liquor stores. [WHAS11]

Just in case you were wondering why nothing ever happens when legislators are unethical mountains of awful? John Schaaf, who has been legal counsel for the Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission since 2004, will become its news executive director Aug. 1. [H-L]

Jeffersonville is breaking ground on a new, less expensive way to stop sewage overflow from being released into the Ohio River. [WLKY]

Tens of thousands of people are deported each year for minor drug offenses, even if they served their time long ago, because of draconian U.S. drug laws, according to a report released Tuesday by the international advocacy group Human Rights Watch. [HuffPo]

A Louisville man was taken into custody for allegedly shooting a father and his son. [WAVE3]

Nobody disputes the fact that Deng Manyoun attacked a Louisville police officer with a flag pole on Saturday afternoon. What is up for debate — among police and the public in Kentucky — is whether the officer’s split-second decision to respond by firing two bullets into the 35-year-old was justified. [WaPo]

In the coming weeks Louisville residents and visitors will have a new option to get around the city. [WFPL]

As the iconic American gun maker Colt Defense struggled to stay in business after losing a key contract to supply M4 rifles to the U.S. Army, the company was paying a range of political allies, including the National Rife Association, the consulting firm set up by retired Army General Stanley McChrystal, and other trade groups and lobbying outfits. [The Intercept]

After a successful event in Louisville in April, the VEX Robotics World Championship will return to the city for the next four years. [Business First]

The New Albany Human Rights Commission declined Friday to make a statement opposing comments made earlier this month by City Councilman Dan Coffey that some have labeled as demeaning toward gays and transgender individuals. [News & Tribune]

Departing Eugene School District Superintendent Sheldon Berman has a new job more than 3,100 miles from Eugene. Berman will serve for one year as the Andover Public Schools interim superintendent in Andover, Mass., during the coming school year. Those “negative, untrue reports” he’s talking about? You already know they were backed up by government documents, telephone records and first-hand accounts. These shysters are why kids can’t have nice things. [Register-Guard]

Compassionate City Loves Killing People

Two weeks after he took a personal leave of absence, principal at the Academy @ Shawnee Houston Barber has resigned from Jefferson County Public Schools. [WDRB]

Louisville Metro Council members want to reallocate up to $5 million from Mayor Greg Fischer’s budget to supplement the city’s “embarrassing” road maintenance. [C-J/AKN]

Really? Killing the guy because he was swinging a flag pole? Way to go, Louisville, you love killing people. How compassionate. [WHAS11]

Bill Mott has conditioned some of the all-time greats in the sport of Thoroughbred racing. Yet last Sunday, he was just another fan on the Belmont Park backstretch, grinning ear to ear while asking fellow trainer Bob Baffert if he could get close to the gleaming bay colt, American Pharoah. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! The loved ones of a man found dead in a west Louisville alley made an emotional plea Friday that someone come forward with information that might lead police to his killer. [WLKY]

The Iowa Supreme Court has affirmed the right to be drunk on your front porch. [HuffPo]

A local company hired to do cleanup related to the massive fire at GE Appliance Park is suing the conglomerate, claiming GE is refusing to pay its bill. [WAVE3]

When it comes to the National Security Agency’s recently disclosed use of automated speech recognition technology to search, index and transcribe voice communications, people in the United States may well be asking: But are they transcribing my phone calls? The answer is maybe. [The Intercept]

This seems like it’s worth paying attention to again. Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad on Wednesday asked the Metro Council to approve a near $170-million budget that includes funding for body cameras and more officers. [WFPL]

The state veterinarian has banned the sale of birds at flea markets and swap meets to protect Kentucky’s poultry industry amid an avian flu outbreak. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No. There is no such thing as too much bourbon fun. [Business First]

Though the New Albany Police Merit Commission has twice voted to fire former officer Laura Schook, the city administration and police department again declined Friday to release disciplinary-related documents in her personnel file. [News & Tribune]

Oldham Co. Should Embrace The Booze

There are only a few places in all of Oldham County where people can buy packaged alcohol like wine or a case of beer. But with more petitions going out this week, there’s a possibility that may soon change. [WDRB]

Downtown leaders tried to calm some jittery nerves Friday by predicting their hard work should minimize any loss of business from the impending two-year closure of the Kentucky International Convention Center. [C-J/AKN]

Watching Donna Hargens mangle this bus incident was almost as terrifying as hearing about a child being dragged. [WHAS11]

A Lawrence County school bus full of students on their way to school started on fire Friday, authorities said. [H-L]

Kentucky recently became one of the first states to let pharmacists dispense without prescription a drug that can reverse a heroin overdose. [WLKY]

Lorca Henley of Bowling Green, Ohio, said her family’s dinners on different nights this week included taco salads, tuna casserole with mashed potatoes, spaghetti with meat sauce and hamburgers they fried on the stove because they were out of propane. [HuffPo]

The mother of the girl dragged by a Jefferson County Public Schools bus said Sunday night that her daughter had been discharged from Kosair Children’s Hospital. [WAVE3]

This is not bourbon and the story will likely cause you to pop a vein. [NPR]

Apryll Buege spent much of her youth in the foster care system. She said she got in some trouble, made some mistakes, but soon realized she needed to pull her life together. [WFPL]

Duke Energy Corp. pleaded guilty Thursday to criminal pollution charges and agreed to $102 million in federal penalties stemming from a February 2014 spill of coal ash waste. [The Hill]

A record crowd turned out to see American Pharoah capture the second jewel of the Triple Crown at Saturday’s Preakness Stakes. [Business First]

Former Democratic congressman Baron Hill plans to join Indiana’s U.S. Senate race to replace retiring Republican Dan Coats. [News & Tribune]