Murder Is Just Way Normal Here, Right?

A Louisville murder victim was recently involved in another high profile case. [WDRB]

Hundreds of new MSD customers have been getting wastewater and drainage services without being billed for them, agency officials said Monday, creating an issue with the Louisville Water Co. that handles billing for both. [C-J/AKN]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO The coroner has identified a man who was shot and killed in the 300 block of East Oak Street on Sunday, March 27. [WHAS11]

Attorney General Andy Beshear has hired another veteran of his father’s administration to replace Tim Longmeyer, the former deputy attorney general who resigned and is now facing federal bribery charges. [Press Release & H-L]

Health officials say the number of cases of whooping cough in northern Kentucky has reached record levels recently. [WLKY]

Young women of color face particularly tough barriers to success in school, work and life. Now one foundation is working with them to break them down. [HuffPo]

Another day, another fun murder in Compassionate City. A man was shot and killed Monday afternoon in the Hallmark neighborhood. [WAVE3]

Turns out, one of the people at the center of the latest political scandal in Kentucky is knee-deep in something really exciting. Spoiler alert: it’s probably not entirely safe for work. [Page One]

Brenda and Robert Erickson filtered into City Hall last Thursday evening, a few minutes before the Louisville Metro Council began its regular meeting. [WFPL]

On November 19, 2014, the door clanged shut behind David Sesson and Bernard Simmons. Sesson put his hands through the food slot to have his handcuffs removed. Both men were in “disciplinary segregation,” a bureaucratic term for solitary confinement, at Menard Correctional Center in southern Illinois. But unlike many in solitary, Sesson and Simmons wouldn’t have a moment alone. [The Marshall Project]

Greater Louisville Inc. announced the promotion of several employees Monday. [Business First]

Animal control officers will have to wait at least two more weeks before they’re able to enforce new Jeffersonville laws on animal welfare. [News & Tribune]