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We Should Support LMPD On This One

November 25th, 2009 by jake · 9 Comments

Really, we should be supporting LMPD. The use of GPS devices to track known criminals is a good thing.




Sure, it’d be bad if police were watching Joe Blow on every street. But that’s not the case.

Sometimes you just have to applaud police when they get something right. And this is something they’re getting right.

Tags: Crime · LMPD · TV · Video · WHAS

9 responses so far ↓

  • 1 jtt // Nov 26, 2009 at 10:03 am

    If Professor Milligan would do a little research, he would learn there is a SCOTUS case pretty much on point – U.S. v. Knotts – slightly different technology but same idea. Court basically said you have no expectation of privacy in your location. There have been quite a few cell phone tracking cases, also – where they tracked a subject by their use of a cell phone.

  • 2 bill // Nov 26, 2009 at 12:09 pm

    Tracking in cell phone that broadcast it position at all times is much different than placing a tracking device.

  • 3 Mark H (Not Hebert) // Nov 26, 2009 at 1:17 pm

    The question really depends on the thought that by being a criminal, do you give up some of your rights?

    If a judge can give the authorities to right to violate someones right to privacy by granting a wiretap, I would think allowing them to know your physical location would be even less intrusive to privacy than a wiretap.

    As far as I know, there is no prohibition from knowing one’s location. There is however, restrictions on knowing what they are saying or doing at a location.

    For example, you do not have the right to make the police leave a location in front of your house or disallow them to follow you, but there is a prohibition from allowing them to come into your home to observe what you are doing inside or listen to your conversations.

    Even those rights can be taken away from you by a judge if they find just cause.

    Bill I share your big brother concerns, but if the authorities wanted to place a surveillance tail on a criminal 24-hours a day, they are allowed. The GPS just allows them to do the same thing cheaper and more efficiently.

  • 4 jtt // Nov 26, 2009 at 2:18 pm

    Bill, the Knott case IS a tracking device case. As Mark noted, it is just an easier way to surveil, it doesn’t implicate any greater privacy issues.

  • 5 Steve Magruder (I, not D or R) // Nov 26, 2009 at 5:15 pm

    A criminal isn’t a criminal until they have been convicted. Until that point, they have the same rights everyone else has.

  • 6 jake // Nov 26, 2009 at 7:19 pm

    And non-convicts can be put under surveillance.

  • 7 Surveilance // Nov 28, 2009 at 2:05 pm

    Actually, if someone is concerned about using their cell phone and being tracked you could always turn it off and put it in a metal box or something metallic. It would be rendered useless at that point until you open the box and then its fair game for what location you are at.

    Not that most people would ever need to do that but it seem that Big Brother feels a need to snoop on everyone because a few miscreants are causing the mass majority of the problems.

    Just like the use of the Clipper chip in the telecommunications facilities brought about during the reign of the Clinton administration.

    There seems to be quite a bit of background in this in communications magazines and policy magazines. Plus everyone needs a good scanner to keep up with what is really going on.

  • 8 Surveilance // Nov 28, 2009 at 2:07 pm

    Actually, if one has the money, there are even countermeasures that one can take if you think that you are being setup or bugged as well. Just because police and others say that you’re doing something wrong doesn’t always make it so. Look at all the people put in the joint for allegedly committing a crime they had no part in. Overzealous and discriminatory prosecutors are often a problem because its more about getting a conviction than actually promoting true justice.

    Just my opinion but it never hurts to have some technology to keep an eye on what the other side is doing.

  • 9 Surveilance // Nov 28, 2009 at 2:14 pm

    I apologize, I was step or two behind on the Clipper chip as it was deactivated in the late 90s. However, being that Government can pretty much tap anything and anyone they want to at this time, it would not be surprise that they would still do it.

    Look at what the Bush administration was wanting to do with tracking people and tracking phones and all communications all in the name of our safety. Yet those people had the most corrupt total administration in most of the US history. Talk about a double standard and seems to be a thing with local and state governments too. So do you want these people to have too much power over your individual lives.

    Thats the real thorny question. People want true criminals punished. But you also have to look at what issues of personal privacy you are giving up. Seems that Government forgot about some of the Constitution of this Commonwealth and the US Constitution.

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