Compassionate City Went Crazy w/Guns

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini told stock analysts on a conference call Monday that the “very capable” leaders of Humana’s Medicare-driven government business will remain in place following Aetna’s planned $37 billion purchase of Humana. [WDRB]

The Rev. Cynthia Campbell of Louisville’s Highland Presbyterian Church says she looks forward to performing its first same-sex marriage now that Kentucky’s ban on gay marriage has been lifted. [C-J/AKN]

Louisville’s Mayor will be celebrating a big milestone at the LG and E Cane Run plant. The conversion from coal fired to natural gas is complete. [WHAS11]

Don’t underestimate the power of a miniature horse. Though small — about 2½ feet tall — miniature horses demonstrated their strength, athleticism and finesse Friday at the Mid-America Miniature Horse Club Mini Julep Cup by jumping, pulling carriages and posing. [H-L]

Another weekend, another bunch of shootings, you know the drill, Possibility City, Compassionate City, blah blah empty words blah. [WLKY]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Seriously, eight people shot and three of them dead in a single weekend. Meanwhile, Greg Fischer plays pat-a-cake with historic preservation, promotes events that only the elite can attend, only addresses something that matters when called out by the media. [WAVE3]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival energy usage will be offset entirely with green power for the first time this year. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Community Ventures Corp. broke ground last week on its planned business incubator called Chef Space in the Russell neighborhood — but what hasn’t been reported yet is that the incubator is just the start. [Business First]

New Albany City Councilman Dan Coffey believes keeping the city’s police vehicle fleet updated will save taxpayers maintenance expenses required to keep older cruisers in service. [News & Tribune]

Major Reality Check For Greg Fischer

You thought everything was going swell for Greg Fischer?

His lack of transparency has gotten so bad that Gill Holland is speaking up:

As much as our city government and the Omni developers most likely want the critical letters to the editor to stop, the reality is that the groundswell of citizen dismay is growing. An increasing number of Louisvillians are realizing there are several significant issues with the Omni situation.

-SNIP-

There are two main problems with this deal. One is financial. The clause of the contract where the city contractually promises NOT to incentivize any other significant (more than 400 rooms) hotel group within a mile of downtown for almost 10 years is of utmost concern. In my mind, the city will grow significantly in the next decade, and we will need another major hotel. But nope, that can’t happen, not if it is within a mile. What if a developer wants to build a 400-room hotel overlooking the upcoming Waterfront Park West? Nope. This clause is a competition killer, and government should encourage competition, not stifle it.

The second problem is a general lack of transparency and community involvement in this deal.

-SNIP-

As concerned citizens and various constituencies write their letters to the editor and do their design charrettes, it doesn’t seem like the city has any true interest in hearing what citizens are saying, because the “deal is done.”

Instead of bucking up and saying things could have been done better, city government seems to be entrenching.

Click here to read the entire letter.

There’s a lot more where that came from.

Compassionate City Shoots Even More

A MetroSafe dispatcher has confirmed that multiple victims were shot near 25th Street and Broadway in west Louisville. [WDRB]

Aetna’s acquisition of Humana appears to be part of a merger frenzy as the five biggest U.S. health insurers look to get bigger. But any acquisition or merger of this proportion must overcome potential hurdles. [C-J/AKN]

The opportunity of ownership is a wish come true for one of Louisville’s newest small business owners looking to turn his new restaurant into the Russell neighborhood’s latest treasure. [WHAS11]

The Humane Society of the United States is objecting to a proposed expansion of bear hunting in Kentucky. The group says the state’s black bear population is still small and needs time to expand. [H-L]

Louisville Fire and Rescue continued their search for three people missing after a pontoon boat capsized on the Ohio River Saturday night. [WLKY]

So let me be clear about a few things: I do not want to order a wedding cake from a bakery owned by a guy who thinks I’m going to hell. I have no desire to purchase bouquets from a florist who pickets Pride parades. I wouldn’t serve pizza at a wedding if the owner paid me and offered to serenade my guests with an a cappella version of “Born This Way.” And finally, the suggestion that I would be insane enough to want to force a homophobic clergyperson to preside over my most sacred day is beyond insulting. [HuffPo]

Louisville is home to more than 12,000 Humana employees, but the company’s sale could affect thousands more. [WAVE3]

Kentucky’s voters have seen this script before: insurgent Kentucky Republican takes down established candidates openly or presumably preferred by U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, Kentucky’s ultimate establishment Republican. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Aetna’s plan to purchase Humana becomes official, what was Louisville’s largest standalone publicly traded company by revenue will cease to exist as the city has known it. [WFPL]

Weight screenings in high school were not enough to get overweight and obese kids on track toward a healthier weight, a recent U.S. study found. [Reuters]

The merger deal between Louisville-based Humana Inc. and Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna Inc. finally has been announced. Though we now know details of the agreement, we have to wait to see what the fallout will be for Louisville. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. But about two months into the division’s operations, the Jeffersonville City Council is discussing ways to reorganize it because some members are dissatisfied with the qualifications of its manager. [News & Tribune]

The Minimum Wage Meltdown Isn’t Over

Community leaders began searching for information Wednesday night regarding who was responsible in the hit and run death of Deniesha Pugh. [WDRB]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Agencies, hospitals and schools across Kentuckiana that serve children with special needs were notified by the WHAS Crusade for Children this week that their grant requests will be funded from the money collected during the 62nd annual WHAS Crusade for Children. [WHAS11]

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate heard arguments Wednesday in an instant-racing lawsuit on a motion by the Family Foundation to have an in-court demonstration of the electronic games based on past horse races. [H-L]

Bourbon lovers can get their hands on a rare bottle of Pappy Van Winkle without having to wait for hours as Liquor Barn celebrates the grand opening of two new locations. [WLKY]

U.S. employers added a solid 223,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate fell to 5.3 percent, a seven-year low. The numbers reflect a job market moving close to full health and raise expectations that the Federal Reserve will start raising interest rates as early as September. [HuffPo]

Thousands of workers will receive a 50-cent increase in their hourly pay Wednesday as Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance goes into effect, even as a lawsuit against the city continues. [WAVE3]

Senator Mitch McConnell is standing by his call to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol Rotunda. [More WDRB]

The first phase of Louisville’s minimum wage increase went into effect Wednesday. [WFPL]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

The city’s greenspace maintenance and landscaping division is up and running after nearly a year of talks to fund it. [News & Tribune]

How’d The Gays Ruin Your Life???

An attorney whose job in Jefferson County Public Schools’ central office was eliminated has been hired as a teacher at Central High School and will earn $84,000 – double the salary of a starting educator — despite not yet having teaching credentials. [WDRB]

Since becoming Chief of Police in 2012, serving the community where I first began as a young patrol officer in Western Louisville in 1980, I have strived to create a police force that is engaged and involved in the city; one that reflects the very people we serve. [C-J/AKN]

The thing no one wants to talk about: the highly-paid lobbyist behind all of this. [WHAS11]

With his campaign deep in debt, Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin is trying to make new friends among Kentucky’s well-heeled donor class. At a private reception in Lexington Monday night, Bevin joined Republican presidential candidate and Florida U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, the Philadelphia 76ers’ Nerlens Noel and some of the state’s top political donors at an event organized by Lexington power couple Kelly Knight and Joe Craft. [H-L]

The gays totally ruined your life again this week. [WLKY]

If you want to silence a black person’s pain, ask for forgiveness. We’re accustomed to our screams being hushed in the wake of tragedy. We’re accustomed to our grief being shoved aside in the rush to find mercy for those who have trespassed against us. [HuffPo]

About 30 same-sex couples have completed the paperwork for a marriage license through the Jefferson County Clerk’s Office in the three business days since the United States Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage bans a violation of equal protections guaranteed through the Constitution’s 14th Amendment. [WAVE3]

The U.S. sued to block Electrolux AB’s $3.3 billion proposed takeover of General Electric Co.’s appliance business. [Bloomberg]

Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, a high-profile group riddled in the past year by tensions over President James Ramsey’s management style and sharing of information. [WFPL]

Data from Kentucky’s 446 public water systems shows they consistently produce excellent quality water and are nearly always in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water requirements, according to the Kentucky annual Drinking Water Report. The report summarizes the compliance data and status of public water system compliance monitoring results. [Energy & Environment Cabinet]

The parent company of The Courier-Journal and WHAS-TV split on Monday to form two new publicly traded companies: TEGNA Inc. and Gannett Co. Inc. [Business First]

Harrison County Council became the second county to sign a resolution in support of a regional development initiative Monday night, exactly two weeks after Clark County Council denied the same resolution to join formal discussions. [News & Tribune]