It’s Time For Some More Bridge Hype

A new Phoenix Hill Distillery has been shut down for illegal production, according to the local Alcoholic Beverage Control. [WDRB]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

The city is asking residents to help Louisville’s homeless veterans take better care of their feet as more former military service members living on the street come forward. [C-J/AKN]

An elementary student is recovering after a car hit them crossing the street near his school. Possibility City! [WHAS11]

A needle exchange program, designed to combat the spread of blood-borne diseases, will begin taking used needles and distributing clean ones Friday at the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! GLENN DOESN’T REALIZE HOW DUMB THIS IS! But you should for real go to Worldfest this weekend. [WLKY]

In July, Café Art, a U.K.-based arts initiative, gave 100 Fujifilm disposable cameras to homeless people in London with just one instruction: take photographs that capture “My London.” [HuffPo]

It’s expected to open by January and the anticipation is building. Decades in the making, the Downtown Crossing is just about complete. [WAVE3]

With the school year just beginning in many districts, parents at two schools are already expressing outrage that transgender students are being allowed to use the bathrooms that match their identities. [ThinkProgress]

Louisville Metro Council members are taking umbrage at excessively tall grass on vacant lots in the city. [WFPL]

Kim Davis and the anti-gay hate group representing her. Don’t be fooled — the organization representing the woman refusing to give out marriage licenses in Kentucky is no ordinary law firm. They have a history of anti-gay hate and bigotry. [Click the Clicky]

Two Louisville-based development companies, including one that recently helped secure a deal to bring a second Costco Wholesale Corp. store to Louisville, are buying land in Jeffersonville and appear set on adding heavy retail to a corridor between a Meijer store and the River Ridge Commerce Center. [Business First]

Floyd County Council President Matt Oakley sent a letter to New Albany City Council President Pat McLaughlin on June 9 requesting a meeting concerning the agreement governing the joint animal shelter. [News & Tribune]

The Swift Plant Is Still Beyond Disgusting

Officials with the Kentucky State Fair say attendance numbers for this year increased from 2014. [WDRB]

The West End Wal-Mart Supercenter is inching forward by filing a new landscaping plan, but a company spokesman said the retailer is waiting for settlement of a lawsuit against its proposed suburban-style design. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a gaping hole in Jeffersonville and we’re apparently not talking about that city’s mayor. [WHAS11]

About two weeks ago, as the golfers were finishing their rounds at Bardstown Country Club, Jack Conway stood in a clubhouse dining room and saw the end of summer approaching and with it, an end to some of the issues that threatened to derail his Democratic campaign for governor. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Louisville is preparing to welcome the region’s largest international festival for the 13th year. [WLKY]

If you’re a working-age person without a job, a disability or a kid, then soon you’re not going to have access to food stamps, either. In another sign of eroding sympathy for the jobless amid a tepid economic recovery, states are restricting benefits for the unencumbered unemployed. [HuffPo]

It’s always inspirational when a child has a dream and is able to turn that dream into a reality. That’s what Rachel Ritchie from Vine Grove, KY is doing. [WAVE3]

No one will be surprised to learn that the campaign to build a national movement against gentrification is being waged out of an office in Brooklyn, New York. [The Atlantic]

The former director of Louisville’s Air Pollution Control District says she believes Metro government should be regulating diesel pollution from a lot owned by pork producer JBS Swift. Lauren Anderson said this week she thinks there’s a valid legal argument to be made for the regulation, but her former agency disagrees. [WFPL]

Tolls sure are going to be awesome for Louisville. The Chicago Skyway is a key conduit for drivers in the Chicago area looking for a weekend getaway. But on this Labor Day weekend, trips to Lake Michigan might be a lot messier than usual. [ThinkProgress]

Appears BF has turned into a publication about whatever whim Jonathan Blue and his relatives decide to play with in a given week. [Business First]

Indiana University Southeast was recognized as one of the country’s safest campuses on a national website. [News & Tribune]

Possibility City’s Back To Shooting Everyone

The future of a Louisville YMCA branch is in jeopardy as traffic at the Berrytown location continues to be low despite numerous efforts to boost attendance. [WDRB]

The more attention news directors give this troubled kid, the worse he gets. It’s almost worse than the way Louisville media folks try to eat each other alive out in fits of jealousy and bitterness. [C-J/AKN]

Two men accused in a Louisville bar attack say they were offered money to carry out the crime. [WHAS11]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

Police are investigating two shootings and are not yet saying if the two incidents are related. [WLKY]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

A new festival is set to highlight a multitude of talented artists from Louisville and across Kentucky. The Golden Culture Art and Music Festival is making history as it brings attention to an often over-looked local music subculture: hip-hop. [WAVE3]

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

By the time Tom Jurich, vice president and director of athletics for the University of Louisville, addressed the media at a news conference this morning, word had spread that U of L planned a $55 million expansion of Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium. [Business First]

In the small Parke County town of Rockville, population 2,591, police officers are donning new body cameras before they head out on patrol. [News & Tribune]

David James In The Hot Seat Again

This should be a ton of fun.

From Phillip Bailey:

An attorney is accusing Metro Councilman David James of violating the city’s code of ethics for showing fellow council members unreleased information on Democratic aide Elizabeth Hoffman’s arrest and incarceration.

Attorney Shannon Fauver filed the complaint, obtained by The Courier-Journal, with the Metro Ethics Commission last Tuesday. It alleges James abused his position to obtain a video and audio tapes of Hoffman’s January arrest and incarceration at Metro Corrections to influence other members.

Ruh ro?

Russell’s A Start And A Big Step Forward

The number of people being shot in Louisville is on the rise, according to Louisville Metro Police. [WDRB]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

Everybody is freaking out about what James Procell, of UofL’s music lie-berry, discovered. [WHAS11]

Sometimes the best ideas really do come while enjoying a glass of bourbon. [H-L]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Thousands of zombies took over the Highlands on Saturday night, but it’s what some of the undead left behind that has neighbors upset. [WLKY]

Louisville is the 4th-most segregated city in America (or the metro area is), apparently, and no one wants to talk about it. When are we going to talk about it? Or are we always just going to hold feel-good events and talk about puppies and rainbows on the teevee instead of trying to improve life for people living in the West End? [HuffPo]

We often hear the stories of homicide victims, but the stories of people who actually survive violent attacks often are left untold. [WAVE3]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

In about a month, Metropolitan Sewer District officials will wrap up a short-term program aimed at buying out homeowners whose houses flood frequently. [WFPL]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Revitalizing Russell — once a bustling economic center in West Louisville — has been a hot topic for some community leaders for years. But the buzz seems to be increasing lately as several projects have committed substantial investment to the neighborhood. [Business First]

Jeffersonville Parks Authority President Ed Zastawny says he wants the public to know the city only had an issue maintaining the 10th Street medians once the Jeffersonville Redevelopment Commission stopped taking care of them early last year. [News & Tribune]